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Full text of "Bulletin of the North Carolina College for Women"

EF 



Volume XXI 



Number 3 



BULLETIN 



OF THE 



NORTH CAROLINA 
COLLEGE for WOMEN 




THE CATALOGUE 

1931-1932 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
i93 2 -!933 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE COLLEGE 
AT GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



THE 

NORTH CAROLINA 
COLLEGE FOR WOMEN 



THE 

FORTIETH 

SESSION 



THE CATALOGUE 
1931-1932 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 
i93 2 -!933 



Entered as second-class mail matter at the Post Office at 
GREENSBORO, NORTH CAROLINA 



1931 


1932 


1933 


JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 








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. . . . 


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AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 












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1 


2| 3 


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SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 






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OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 










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...[.. 




NOVEMBER 


MAY 


NOVEMBER 


MAY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


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II 2 


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61 7 






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DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 






II 2| 3 


4 


5 








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13 


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19 


20 


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31 






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29 


30 






25 


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27 


23 


23 


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25 


26 


27 


28 

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30 . . 






COLLEGE CALENDAR 



1932 
June 12 
September 13 
September 14 

September 15 

September 16 
September 17 
October 5 
November 24 
December 20 

1933 
January 4 
January 21-27 
January 30-31 

February 1 
April 1 
April 10 
May 27 - June 2 
June 3, 4, 5 



Monday. Registration, First Summer Session. 

Tuesday. 9 :00 a.m. Freshman "Week Begins. 

Wednesday. Examinations for Removal of Con- 
ditions and for Advanced Standing. 

Thursday. Registration of Freshmen, Commer- 
cial, and Transfer Students. 

Friday. Registration of Former Students. 

Saturday. Work of First Semester Begins. 

Wednesday. Founder's Day. 

Thursday. Holiday. Thanksgiving Day. 

Tuesday. Christmas Holidays Begin at 5 :00 p.m. 



Wednesday. Work Resumed at 8 :15 a.m. 

Saturday through Friday. Examinations. 

Monday and Tuesday. Registration for Second 
Semester. 

Wednesday. Work of Second Semester Begins. 

Saturday. Spring Vacation Begins at 12 :05 p.m. 

Monday. Work Resumed at 8 :15 a.m. 

Saturday through Friday. Examinations. 

Saturday, Sunday, Monday. Commencement. 






TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Part I — Officers page 

The Board of Directors 5 

Officers of Administration 6 

The Faculty 7 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 20 

Part II — Information 

The College 22 

Buildings and Grounds 25 

Directions to New Students 29 

Requirements for Admission 30 

Admission to Advanced Standing 36 

Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 37 

Registration 40 

Academic Regulations 41 

Expenses 45 

Loan Funds and Fellowships 49 

Government and Student Welfare 52 

Organizations 57 

Publications 63 

Part III — Courses of Instruction 64 

Part IV — Organization 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 124 

The School of Education 126 

The School of Music 130 

The School of Home Economics 135 

The Commercial Department 137 

The Graduate Division 139 

The Extension Division 141 

The Summer Session Division 145 

The Library 156 

PartY— The Record, 1931-32 

Commencement Exercises and Degrees Conferred, 1931 . . . 158 



PART I — OFFICERS 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

THE FACULTY 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 



THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

0. Max Gardner, Governor, President ex officio of the Board of 
Directors. 

A. T. Allen, Superintendent op Public Instruction, Vice-Pres- 
ident ex officio of the Board of Directors. 

*A. J. Conner, Secretary. 

E. J. Forney, Treasurer. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD 

*J. D. Murphy, Chairman Mrs. J. A. Brown 

J. L. Nelson A. T. Allen 

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD 

A. T. Allen Wake County 

*A. J. Conner Northampton County 

(Term expires March 1, 1932) 

Mrs. W. T. Bost Wake County 

(Term expires March 1, 1932) 

J. L. Nelson Caldwell County 

(Term expires March 1, 1932) 

George R. Ward Duplin County 

(Term expires March 1, 1932) 

Miss Easdale Shaw Richmond County 

(Term expires March 1, 1934) 

Junius D. Grimes Beaufort County 

(Term expires March 1, 1934) 

Thurmond Chatham Forsyth County 

(Term expires March 1, 1934) 

*J. D. Murphy Buncombe County 

(Term expires March 1, 1936) 

Mrs. J. A. Brown Columbus County 

(Term expires March 1, 1936) 

A. E. Woltz Gaston County 

(Term expires March 1, 1936) 

* Deceased. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



Julius I. Foust, LL.D., President. 

Walter Clinton Jackson, LL.D., Vice-President and Chairman of 
the Faculty of Social Science. 

E. J. Forney, Treasurer, 

Anna M. Gove, M.D., Physician. 

Laura H. Coit, Secretary of the College. 

Mary Taylor Moore, Registrar. 

Charles H. Stone, A.M., B.L.S., Librarian. 

Chase Going Woodhouse, A.M., Vocational Director and Head of 
Appointment Bureau. 

Claude E. Teague, A.B., Business Manager and Director of Exten- 
sion Division. 

THE CABINET 

Jultus I. Foust, LL.D., President. 

Walter Clinton Jackson, LL.D., Vice-President and Chairman of 
the Faculty of Social Science. 

William C. Smith, L.H.D., Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. 

John H. Cook, Ph.D., Dean of the School of Education and Direc- 
tor of the Summer Session. 

Blanche E. Shaffer, A.M., Dean of the School of Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Winfield S. Barney, Ph.D., Chairman of the Faculty of Lan- 
guages and Literature. 

John Paul Givler, A.M., Chairman of the Faculty of Mathematics 
and Science. 

Wade R. Brown, Mus.D., Dean of the School of Music. 

Mary M. Petty, B.S., Cabinet Member from the Faculty at Large. 

Chase Going Woodhouse, A.M., Cabinet Member from the Faculty 
at Large. 

Laura H. Coit, Secretary. 



THE FACULTY 



Arranged {with the exception of the President) in each division in 
order of appointment. 

Julius I. Foust, Ph.B., Lli.D., President. 

University of North Carolina, Ph.B., 1890; LL.D., 1910. 

Viola Boddie, Professor of Latin. 
Peabody College. 

E. J. Forney, Professor of Stenography, and Treasurer. 

Anna M. Gove, M.D., Professor of Hygiene, and Physician, 
Woman's Medical College of the New York Infirmary, M.D., 1892. 

Mary M. Petty, B.S., Professor of Chemistry. 

Wellesley College, B.S., 1885; Bryn Mawr College, 1895-96. 

Laura H. Coit, Secretary. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1896. 

William C. Smith, Ph.B., L.H.D., Professor of English Language 
and TAterature and Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences. 
University of North Carolina, Ph.B., 1896; L.H.D., 1920. 

Walter Clinton Jackson, B.S., LL.D., Professor of History and 
Vice-President of the College. 

Mercer University, B.S., 1900; LL.D., 1926; University of Chicago. 

Mary Taylor Moore, Registrar. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1903. 

Wade R. Brown, Mus.D., Professor of Music and Dean of the 
School of Music. 
Diploma, New England Conservatory of Music, 1890; Wake Forest College, 
Mus.D., 1922. 

John H. Cook, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education, Dean of the 
School of Education, and Director of the Summer Session. 

Ohio Northern University, B.S., 1908 ; Miami, B. A., 1912 ; Columbia Uni- 
versity, M.A., 1917; Ph.D., 1925. 

Caroline P. B. Schoch, Ph.B., M.A., Professor of German. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1907; University of Marburg, 1907-1908; 
University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1919. 



8 The North Carolina College for Women 

Blanche Elaine Shaffer, B.S., M.A., Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics, and Dean of the School of Home Economics. 
Columbia University, B.S., 1912; M.A., 1918. 

Winfield S. Barney, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 
Dartmouth College, B.A., 1905; Hobart College, M.A., 1911; Syracuse 
University, Ph.D., 1916. 

John Paul Givler, Ph.B., M.A., Professor of Biology. 

Hamline University, B.A., 1906; M.A., 1912. 

Cora Strong, B.A., M.A., Professor of Mathematics. 

Cornell University, B.A., 1903; University of Michigan, M.A., 1931. 

Martha Elizabeth Winfield, B.S., M.A., Professor of English. 

Columbia University, B.S., 1915; M.A., 1923. 

Etta R. Spier, B.S., M.A., Professor of Education. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1895; Columbia Uni- 
versity, B.S., 1917; M.A., 1921. 

Harriet Wiseman Elliott, B.A., M.A., Professor of Political 

Science. 

Hanover College, B.A., 1910; Columbia University, M.A., 1913. 

Alonzo C. Hall, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 

Elon College, B.A., 1910; Columbia University, M.A., 1913. 

James Albert Highsmith, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1910; M.A., 1915; George Peabody 
College for Teachers, Ph.D., 1923. 

*A. P. Kephart, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Educational Practice. 
Coe College, B.A., 1904; M.A., 1912; University of Pennsylvania, Ph.D., 
1918. 

Mary Channing Coleman, B.S., Professor of Physical Education. 

Columbia University, B.S., 1917; Wellesley. 

William Raymond Taylor, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1915; Harvard University, M.A., 
1916. 

William Woodrow Martin, Ph.B., M.A., Professor of Psychology. 

University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1904; M.A., 1922. 
Alex Matthews Arnett, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Mercer University, B.A., 1908; Columbia University, M.A., 1913; Ph.D., 
1922. 



On leave of absence. 



The Faculty 9 

Clarence D. Johns, B.A., M.A., Professor of History. 

Bandolph-Macon College, B.A., 1908; Chicago University, M.A., 1911. 

Glenn R. Johnson, B.A., M.A., Professor of Sociology. 

Eeed College, B.A., 1915; Columbia University, M.A., 1916. 

Benjamin B. Kendrick, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of History. 

Mercer University, B.S., 1905; M.A., 1911; Columbia University, Ph.D., 
1914. 

Leonard B. Hurley, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 
Duke University, B.A., 1913; M.A., 1916. 

Albert S. Keister, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Economics. 

Otterbein College, B.A., 1910; Columbia University, M.A., 1911; Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Ph.D., 1927. 

George A. Underwood, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

University of Missouri, B.A., 1905; M.A., 1906; Harvard University, 
Ph.D., 1914; Sorbonne, University of Paris, 1911-12. 

*Lloyd E. Blauch, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Education. 

Goshen College, B.A., 1916; University of Chicago, M.A., 1917; Ph.D., 
1923. 

Earl H. Hall, B.S., M.S., Professor of Botany. 
University of Chicago, B.S., 1919; M.S., 1920. 

Ruth Fitzgerald, B.S., M.A., Professor of Education. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1905; Columbia Uni- 
versity, B.S., 1925; M.A., 1926. 

George M. Thompson, M.Mus., Professor of Music. 

Beaver College (Pa.), B.Mus., 1915; M.Mus., 1920; Pittsburgh Musical 
Institute and Chicago College of Music; Pupil of Clarence Eddy of 
Chicago and Joseph Bonnet of Paris. 

Henry H. Fuchs, B.A., B.Mus., Professor of Music Theory. 

College of City of New York, B.A., 1906; Columbia University, B.Mus., 
1910. 

J. Arthur Dunn, B.A., M.A., Professor of English. 
University of Missouri, B.A., 1908; M.A., 1909. 

Malcolm K. Hooke, B.A., D. de l'Univ., Professor of Romance 
Languages. 
University of Chattanooga, B.A., 1918; Sorbonne, Diplome d 'etudes de 
Civilisation franchise, 1921; Docteur de l'Universite de Paris, 1926. 



On leave of absence. 



10 The North Carolina College for Women 

Charles H. Stone, M.A., B.L.S., Librarian. 

University of Georgia, B.S., 1912; M.A., 1913; University of Illinois, 
B.L.S., 1916. 

Helen Barton, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics. 

Goucher College, B.A., 1913; Johns Hopkins University, M.A., 1922; Ph.D., 
1926. 

Chase Going Woodhouse, B.A., M.A., Vocational Director. 

McGill University, B.A., 1912; M.A., 1913; University of Berlin, 1913-14. 

Calvin N. Warfield, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Physics. 
Johns Hopkins University B.E., 1923; M.A., 1925; Ph.D., 1926. 

Elizabeth McIver Weatherspoon, Associate Professor of Edu- 
cation. 
The North Carolina College for Women. 

Elva Eudora Barrow, B.A., M.S., Associate Professor of Chem- 



Eandolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A., 1911; University of Chicago, 
M.S., 1923. 

Mollie Anne Peterson, Ph.B., M.A., Associate Professor of Home 
Economics. 
University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1914; Columbia University, M.A., 1921. 

Oliver Perry Clutts, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of Educa- 
tion. 
Ohio University, B.S., 1913; Columbia University, M.A., 1917. 

Magnhilde Gullander, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of History. 
University of Wisconsin, B.A., 1916; University of Pennsylvania, M.A., 
1925. 

Inez Coldwell, B.A., Associate Professor of Biology. 
Southwestern College, B.A., 1915. 

Jessie C. Laird, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 

Mount Holyoke College, B.A., 1906; University of Michigan M.A., 1909; 
University of Marburg, Alliance Franeaise, Paris, University of Poitiers; 
Officer d'Academie. 

Meta Helena Miller, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. 
Goucher College, B.A., 1917; Johns Hopkins University, M.A., 1919; 
Ph.D., 1922. 



The Faculty 11 

Ruth M. Collings, B.A., M.D., Associate Professor of Hygiene, and 
Associate Physician. 
Pomona College, B.A., 1919; University of Pennsylvania, M.D., 1923. 

Mildred Rutherford Gould, B.S., M.A., Associate Professor of 
English. 
Columbia University, B.S., 1907; M.A., 1921. 

Rene Hardre, Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

C.E.N. Angers, 1908; University of Caen; C.A.P. Eennes, 1911; Pro- 
fessorat des Ecoles Normales, Paris, 1919; University of London; Uni- 
versity of Edinburgh; Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur; Officer 
d 'Academie. 

Florence Louise Schaeffer, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of 
Chemistry. 
Barnard College, B.A., 1920; Mount Holyoke College, M.A., 1922; Tale 
University. 

Archie D. Shaftesbury, B.A., Associate Professor of Zoology. 
Southwestern College (Kan.), B.A., 1920. 

Alleine Richard Minor, B.S., Associate Professor of Piano. 

Meredith College; The North Carolina College for Women; New England 
Conservatory; Columbia University, B.S., 1930. 

Herbert Kimmel, B.A., Ph.M., Associate Professor of Education. 
Indiana University, B.A., 1908; University of Chicago, Ph.M., 1909. 

Augustine LaRochelle, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of 
Spanish. 
University of Vermont, B.A., 1916; Columbia University, M.A., 1921; 
Diploma, Centro de Estudios Historicos, Madrid. 

Abigail E. Rowley, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 
Denison University, B.A., 1915; Columbia University, M.A., 1921. 

George P. Wilson, B.A., M.A., Associate Professor of English. 

University of North Carolina, B.A., 1913; Columbia University, M.A., 
1919; University of Wisconsin. 

*Norman Baird Foster, B.A., M.S., Associate Professor of Physics. 
Cedarville College, B.A., 1920; North Carolina State College, M.S., 1923. 

Helen Ingraham, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of Biology. 
Knox College, B.S., 1918; University of Chicago, M.S., 1921. 

Mary Lois Ferrell, Associate Professor of Piano. 

Northwestern University; Student of Ernest Hutcheson and Emil Sauer. 



* On leave of absence. 



12 The North Carolina College for Women 

Faith Fairfield Gordon, B.S., M.D., Associate in Vocational De- 
partment. 

Boston University, B.S., 1920; M.D., 1923. 

Victoria Carlsson, M.A., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Hygiene. 
Columbia University, B.Sc, 1922; M.Sc, M.A., 1923; Ph.D., 1929. 

Claude Edward Teague, B.A., Director of Extension Division and 
Business Manager. 
University of North Carolina, B.A., 1912. 

Vera Largent, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of History. 
Knox College, B.A., 1915; University of Chicago, M.A., 1923. 

Grace Van Dyke More, B.Mus., M.S., Assistant Professor of Public 
School Music. 

University of Illinois, B.Mus., 1922; University of Denver; University of 
Wisconsin; University of Illinois, M.S., 1931. 

Bernice Evelyn Draper, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of 
History. 
Lawrence College, B.A., 1919; University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1922. 

Mildred Pearl Harris, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Hygiene. 
University of Michigan, B.A., 1921; M.A., 1924. 

Ada Davis, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Sociology. 
Oberlin College, B.A., 1916; University of Chicago, M.A., 1925. 

Marie B. Denneen, B.A., M.A.; Assistant Professor of Education. 
University of Minnesota, B.A., 1912; M.A., 1922. 

James W. Painter, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 
Emory and Henry College, B.A., 1920; Universitv of Tennessee, M.A., 
1923. 

Viva M. Playfoot, B.S., M.A., Assistant Professor of Home Eco- 
nomics. 
Columbia University, B.S., 1925; M.A., 1931. 

Jane Summerell, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1910; 1922; Columbia 
University, M.A., 1924. 

Nettie Sue Tillett, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of English. 
Duke University, B.A., 1913; Columbia University, M.A., 1924. 

Alice Katherine Abbott, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of 
Romance Languages. 

Smith College, B.A., 1921; University of Illinois, M.A., 1927; Centro de 
Estudios Historicos, Madrid. 



The Faculty 13 

J. A. Smith, B.Ed., M.S., Assistant Professor of Education. 

Illinois State Normal University, B.Ed., 1916; University of Illinois, 
M.S., 1926. 

Maude Williams, B.A., M.S., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

University of Illinois, B.A., 1924; M.S., 1926. 

Lila Belle Love, M.S., Assistant Professor of Biology. 
University of Nebraska, M.S., 1921. 

Emily Holmes Watkins, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Math- 
ematics. 

Kandolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A., 1916; Columbia University, M.A., 
1926. 

Key L. Barkley, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Psychology. 
Berea College, B.A., 1926; University of North Carolina, M.A., 1927; 
Ph.D., 1930. 

Charles Crittenden, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

University of Michigan, B.A., 1926; M.A., 1927. 

Helen Prances Cutting, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of 
Spanish. 
Adelphi College, B.A., 1921; Columbia University, M.A., 1930. 

John A. Kelley, B.A., M.A., Assistant Professor of Romance Lan- 
guages. 
Lawrence College, B.A., 1926; University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1927. 

Anna Reger, B.A., B.S., Assistant Professor of Library Science. 
West Virginia Wesleyan, B.A., 1916; Columbia University, B.S., 1931. 

Albert Frederick Thiel, M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 
Biology. 

University of Minnesota, B.A., 1916; University of Nebraska, M.A., 1917; 
University of Chicago, Ph.D., 1931. 

John A. Tiedeman, M.S., Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Union College, B.S., 1926 ; M.S., 1928 ; University of Virginia, Ph.D., 1931. 

Betty Aiken Land, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1927; Columbia University, 
M.A., 1930. 

Patty Spruill, B.S., Instructor in Commercial Department. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1912; B.A., 1926. 

Mary Fitzgerald, B.A., Instructor in Education. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1908 ; B.A., 1930. 



14 The North Carolina College for Women 

Sue Kyle Southwick, Instructor in Music. 

Diploma, New England Conservatory of Music, 1918. 

Anne Shamburger, Instructor in Hygiene. 

Guilford College, Johns Hopkins University, School of Hygiene and Public 
Health. 

Agnes Marie Clegg, B.A., M.A., Instructor in English. 

Guilford College, B.A., 1918; University of Forth Carolina, M.A., 1921. 

Catherine T. Dennis, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Home Economics. 
William and Mary College, B.S., 1921 ; Teachers College, M.A., 1927. 

Miriam MacFadyen, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1900; Columbia Uni- 
versity, B.S., 1926; M.A., 1930. 

Agnes N. Coxe, B.L., B.S., M.A., Instructor in Home Economics. 
Flora MacDonald College, B.L., 1919; The North Carolina College for 
Women, B.S., 1927; Columbia University, M.A., 1930. 

Anna M. Kreimeier, Ph.B., Instructor in Education. 
University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1923. 

Minna Margaret Lauter, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
University of Wisconsin, B.S., 1926. 

Hope Tisdale, B.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 

Barnard College, B.A., 1925; Diploma, Central School of Hygiene and 
Physical Education, 1927. 

Myra H. Butler, Ph.B., Instructor in Institutional Management. 
Brown University, Ph.B., 1899; University of Nebraska; Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Elizabeth Craig, B.P., Instructor in Commercial Department. 
The North Carolina CoUege for Women, B.P., 1913. 

Aldace Fitzwater, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
Columbia University, B.S., 1928. 

Ella Battle McDearman, B.A., Instructor in Chemistry. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926. 

Dorothy Lee Clement, B.S., Instructor in Music. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1923. 

Emily Haskell Davis, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Home Economics. 

Ohio State University, B.A., 1928; Columbia University, M.A., 1929. 



The Faculty 15 

Flora White Edwards, B.S., Instructor in Home Economics. 
Guilford College, B.S., 1911; Peabody College, B.S., 1916. 

Gertrude Friederich, B.S., Instructor in Music. 

University of Michigan, Diploma in Violin, 1926; B.S., 1929. 

Nora Thompson Gerberich, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education. 

University of Pennsylvania, B.A., 1919; Columbia University, M.A., 1929; 
Diploma, McGill University; University of Paris. 

Harriett Mehaffie, Ph.B., Instructor in Education. 
University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1926. 

Katherine Taylor, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Romance Languages. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1928; Radcliffe CoUege, 
M.A., 1929. 

Christine White, Instructor in Physical Education. 
Boston School of Physical Education. 

Carlotta Barnes, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Music. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.S., 1926; Columbia University, 
M.A., 1930. 

Florence M. Chitester, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Psychology. 
University of Pittsburgh, B.A., 1927; M.A., 1928. 

Dorothy Davis, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Physical Education. 
Western College, B.A., 1928 ; University of Wisconsin, M.A., 1930. 

Minnie Middleton Hussey, B.A., Instructor in Library Science. 
Meredith College, B.A.. 1911; The North Carolina College for Women, 
B.A., 1930. 

Catharine Lieneman, B.A., M.S., Instructor in Biology. 

Nebraska University, B.A., 1925; Washington University, M.S., 1927. 

Kuth Sims Norton, B.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
Columbia University, B.S., 1923. 

Lou S. Shine, B.A., M.A., Instructor in English. 
University of North Carolina, B.A., 1921; M.A., 1926. 

Edythe D. Schneider, B.M., Instructor in Music. 
Bush Conservatory, B.M., 1930. 

Madeleine Blakey Street, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Home Eco- 
nomics. 
College of William and Mary, B.S., 1922 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1931. 



16 The North Carolina College for Women 

Vivian Farlowe, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Biology. 

Western Maryland College, B.A., 1925; University of Virginia, M.A., 1928. 

Isadore Blacklock, B.S., Instructor in Charge of Nursery School. 
Buffalo State Teachers College, B.S., 1926; Merrill Palmer School. 

June Louise Cooley, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Western State College of Colorado, B.A., 1928; George Peabody College, 
M.A., 1931. 

Ruth Gunter, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1914 and 1925; Columbia 
University, M.A., 1930. 

Helen Krug, B.S., M.A., Instructor in Education. 

Eastern State Teachers College (S. Dak.), B.S., 1927; Columbia Univer- 
sity, M.A., 1931. 

Eunice Ann Lloyd, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education. 
Wellesley College, B.A., 1925 ; Columbia University, M.A., 1931. 

Ethel L. Martus, B.A., M.S., Instructor in Physical Education. 
Brown University, B.A., 1929; Wellesley College, M.S., 1931. 

Prances Stubbs, B.A., B.S., Instructor in Library Science. 

Georgia State College for Women, B.A., 1925; Columbia University, B.S., 
1931. 

Ruth Wyatt Teachey, B.A., Instructor in Education. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1922. 

Margaret Wilson, B.A., M.A., Instructor in Education. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1921; Columbia University, 
M.A., 1927. 

Mary Welsh Parker, B.A., Assistant in Chemistry. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

Mary Delia Rankin, B.A., Assistant in Biology. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

THE LIBRARY 

Charles H. Stone, M.A., B.L.S., Librarian. 

University of Georgia. B.S., 1912; M.A., 1913; University of Illinois, 
B.L.S., 1916. 

E. Elizabeth Sampson, B.S., Head Cataloguer. 

Simmons College, B.S., 1918. 



The Faculty 17 

Sue Vernon Williams, B.A., M.A., Reference Librarian. 

Eandolph-Macon Woman's College, B.A., 1919; M.A., 1922; Carnegie 
Library School (Atlanta), Certificate, 1922. 

Kathryn W. Price, B.A., Head of Circulation Department, 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926; The North Carolina 
College for Women, B.A. in Library Science, 1931. 

Virginia Trumper, In Charge of Periodicals. 

Denison University; Louisville Public Library Training Class. 

Minnie Middleton Hussey, B.A., Librarian Training School. 

Meredith College, B.A., 1911; The North Carolina College for Women, 
B.A., 1930. 

Mary Ruth Angle, Circulation Department. 
Converse College. 

Katharyne Eaves Freeman, B.A., Circulation Department. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1929. 

Marjorie Hood, B.A., Assistant Cataloguer. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926. 

Gladys D. Sutton, Secretary to the Librarian. 

OFFICE OF REGISTRAR 

Mary Taylor Moore, Registrar. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1903. 

Mary Alice Tennent, B.A., Assistant Registrar. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1920. 

Edith Harwood, B.L., Chief Clerk. 
Berea College, B.L., 1920. 

Mildred P. Newton, B.A., Secretary to the Registrar. 
Goucher College, B.A., 1924. 

DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT LIFE 

Minnie L. Jamison, Student Counselor in Charge of Freshmen. 
The North Carolina College for Women. 

Lillian Killingsworth, B.A., Student Counselor in Charge of 
Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 
Erskine College, B.A., 1914; Columbia University. 



18 The North Carolina College for "Women 

Flora Marie Meredith, B.A., Student Counselor. 
Duke University, B.A., 1923. 

Katherine Sherrill, B.A., Student Counselor. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1926. 

Ernestine Welton, B.A., Student Counselor. 
The North Carolina College for "Women, B.A., 1928. 

Elizabeth Steinhardt, B.A., Student Counselor. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1929. 

Frances Summerell, B.A., Student Counselor. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1916 and 1929. 

VOCATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

Chase Going Woodhouse, B.A., M.A., Vocational Director. 

McGill University, B.A., 1912; M.A., 1913; University of Berlin, 1913-14. 

Faith Fairfield Gordon, B.S., M.D., Associate in Vocational 
Department. 
Boston University, B.S., 1920; M.D., 1923. 

Frona Brooks Hughes, B.A., Appointment Secretary. 
Smith College, B.A., 1922; University of Illinois, 1923-24. 

Hallie Anthony, Clerk. 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Hope Coolidge, B.S., M.S., Dietitian. 

Salem College, B.A., 1914; Diploma, Battle Creek; Columbia University, 
B.S., 1917; M.S., 1921. 

Estelle Boyd, Supervisor of Dormitories. 
Pratt Institute. 

Clora McNeill, Secretary to the President. 
The North Carolina College for Women. 

Edna A. Forney, B.A., Assistant Treasurer. 

Diploma, The North Carolina College for Women, 1908; B.A., 1929. 

Clara Booth Byrd, B.A., Alumnae Secretary. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1913 and 1928. 

Jessie McLean, R.N., Nurse. 
Elizabeth Henninger, Nurse. 



The Faculty 19 

Bessie Doub, Assistant Dietitian. 

Eva J. Cox, B.L., Secretary to the Dean of the School of Education. 

Kathleen Pettit Hawkins, Manager of the Post Office. 

Helen Pickard, Secretary to the Business Manager. 

Lillian Mebane, Clerk. 

Ruth Grigg, Clerk. 

Annie H. Hughes, Secretary to the Physician. 

Cora Jane Staton, R.N., Nurse. 

Betty B. Brown, B.A., Manager of Book Store. 
The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

Grace Ellington Graves, Clerk. 

Sara Henry, B.A., Clerk. 

The North Carolina College for Women, B.A., 1931. 

J. M. Sink, Superintendent of Grounds and Buildings. 



20 The North Carolina College for Women 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 

Faculty Council. The Council, presided over by the President 
or the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, is the 
legislative body of the Institution. It is composed of the Deans, 
Professors, Chief Administrative Officers, and Associate Pro- 
fessors. The Council meets regularly on the third Monday of 
each month. 

Academic Board. President Foust, Chairman ex officio; Dr. Ken- 
drick, Dr. Barton, Miss Ruth Fitzgerald, Miss Jane Summerell, 
Mrs. Woodhouse, Executive Secretary ; Dr. Jackson, Member ex 
officio. 

Board of Admissions. Dr. Highsmith, Chairman; Miss Coit, Dr. 
Barney, Mr. Johns, Miss Mary Taylor Moore, Executive Sec- 
retary. 

Committee on Advanced Standing. Miss Strong, Chairman ; Miss 
Rowley, Mr. Johns, Miss Mary Taylor Moore, Executive Sec- 
retary. 

Advisers for Freshmen and Sophomores for A.B. Course. Alice 
Abbott, A. M. Arnett, Elva Barrow, Victoria Carlsson, Marie 
Clegg, 0. P. Clutts, Ada Davis, Bernice Draper, Harriet Elliott, 
Mildred Gould, Magnhilde Gullander, E. H. Hall, Rene Hardre, 
Mildred Harris, M. K. Hooke, Helen Ingraham, C. D. Johns, 
Glenn R. Johnson, A. S. Keister, B. B. Kendrick, Jessie Laird, 
Vera Largent, Augustine LaRochelle, Lila Belle Love, Ella 
McDearman, W. W. Martin, Meta Helena Miller, James Painter, 
Abigail Rowley, Florence Schaeffer, Caroline Schoch, Archie 
Shaftesbury, Anne Shamburger, J. A. Smith, Etta Spier, Jane 
Summerell, Katherine Taylor, W. R. Taylor, Nettie S. Tillett, 
G. A. Underwood, Calvin Warfield, Emily H. Watkins, Maude 
Williams, George P. Wilson. 

For B.S. in Physical Education Course. Mary Channing Cole- 
man. 

For B.S. in Music Course. Wade R. Brown, Dorothy Clement, 
Mary Lois Ferrell, H. H. Fuchs, Alleine Minor, Grace Van 
Dyke More, George Thompson. 

For B.S. in Home Economics Course. Agnes Coxe, Emily Davis, 
Flora White Edwards, Mollie Anne Peterson. 

Calendar of College Events. Dr. Barton, Chairman ; Dr. Under- 
wood. 

Chapel Exercises and Lectures. Mr. A. C. Hall, Chairman ; Mrs. 
Woodhouse, Miss Denneen, Mr. Hurley. 



Standing Committees of the Faculty 21 

College Dramatics. Dr. Arnett, Chairman; Miss Winfield, Miss 
Killingsworth, Dr. Collings, Mr. Fuchs. 

Concert Committee. Dr. Brown, Chairman ; Mr. Fuchs, Mr. Hur- 
ley. 

Freshman Week (Sub-Committee of the Academic Board). Dr. 
Jackson, Chairman; Mrs. Woodhouse, Miss Ruth Fitzgerald, 
Dr. Warfield, Dr. Barkley. 

Library. Dr. Arnett, Chairman; Miss Boddie, Mr. Stone, Mr. 
Martin. 

Petitions. Miss Winfield, Chairman; Dr. Hooke, Mr. Kimmel, 
Miss Tennent, Executive Secretary. 

Schedule. Miss Mary Taylor Moore, Chairman; Dr. Highsmith, 
Miss Laird, Mr. J. A. Smith. 

Weil Fellowship. Dr. Underwood, Chairman; Miss Boddie, Dr. 
Jackson. 

Conferences and Conventions. Mr. Teague, Chairman; Miss 
Shaffer, Miss Jamison, Mr. Johnson, Miss Elliott, Miss Byrd. 

Mendenhall Scholarship. Miss Strong, Chairman; Miss Petty, 
Dr. Warfield. 

Social. Miss Petty, Chairman; Miss Killingsworth, Miss Jamison, 
Mr. Shaftesbury. 

Auditorium. Mr. Shaftesbury, Chairman; Dr. Hooke, Mr. Clutts. 

Campus. Mr. E. H. Hall, Chairman; Mrs. Woodhouse, Mrs. 
Weatherspoon, Miss Peterson. 

Arrival of Students. Mr. A. C, Hall, Chairman ; Mr. Clutts, Mr. 
Fuchs, Mr. J. A. Smith, Mr. Painter. 

Departure of Students. Mr. Taylor, Chairman; Mr. E. H. Hall, 
Mr. Kimmel, Mr. Wilson. 

Legislative Board (Advisory). Miss Jamison, Dr. Barton, Miss 
Sherrill. 

Debaters' Club (Advisory) . Dr. Keister, Mrs. Davis. 



PART II — INFORMATION 



THE COLLEGE 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

DIRECTIONS TO NEW STUDENTS 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

REGISTRATION 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

EXPENSES 

LOAN FUNDS AND FELLOWSHIPS 

GOVERNMENT AND STUDENT WELFARE 

ORGANIZATIONS 

PUBLICATIONS 



THE COLLEGE 

HISTORY, ORGANIZATION, AND PURPOSE 

The North Carolina College for Women was the first institution 
established by the State of North Carolina for the higher educa- 
tion of women. It came into being as a direct result of the crusade 
made by Dr. Charles Duncan Mclver in behalf of the education of 
women as a means of educating the whole people. The idea, though 
somewhat revolutionary, gained credence and strength when other 
pioneers in public school education — notably, Aycock, Alderman, 
and Joyner — came to Dr. Mclver 's assistance. More than to any 
other one person, however, the College owes its existence to Dr. 
Mclver. He it was who formulated the ideals which the College now 
embodies, and who so laid its foundations and outlined its future 
growth that the institution must ever remain a monument to his 
foresight, his courage, and his statesmanship. He became its first 
president and served until his death in 1906. 

The legislation establishing the North Carolina College for 
Women was enacted in 1891 ; and on October 5, 1892, the College 
opened its doors with 223 students and 15 members of the faculty. 
In this its fortieth year it has an enrollment of 1,710 and a faculty 
of 177 members. The first graduating class, that of 1893, num- 
bered 10 ; the class of 1931 numbered 281. 



The College 23 

In order to secure the location of the new institution in Greens- 
boro, a group of public-spirited men donated a ten-acre site; and 
the City of Greensboro voted bonds to the sum of $30,000 for the 
erection of the first buildings. The General Assembly granted 
$10,000 for support and maintenance the first year. The original 
acreage has been increased by the purchase of about 134 acres 
exclusive of a dairy farm of 255 acres. The appropriation has 
likewise been increased with the growth of the College. 

Originally, the chief purpose of the College was to provide 
instruction for women who expected to enter the public school sys- 
tem of the State ; and at no time in its history have the authori- 
ties lost sight of this purpose. More than two-thirds of all the 
enrolled students and nine-tenths of all the graduates render ser- 
vice in either the public or private schools of North Carolina. The 
curriculum has, however, been so broadened in recent years that 
it now affords a sound basis for liberal culture and for further 
scholarly research. Furthermore, the School of Education is better 
equipped than ever to take care of the professional needs of the 
school system. It not only offers training in primary and gram- 
mar-grade work, but it is the only school of education in the State 
which includes a complete high school where students planning 
to teach in high schools may receive actual practice in their chosen 
subjects. To this high school the General Education Board of 
New York City recently made a grant of $90,000. Teacher training 
is also offered by the Home Economics department of the College, 
which has been unqualifiedly designated for such work by the Fed- 
eral Board of Education. 

For students who may not wish to teach, but who must look to 
their own efforts for a livelihood, instruction is offered in the com- 
mercial branches, in drawing, in industrial art, in home economics, 
and in other subjects, the mastery of which will enable them to 
become self-supporting. The College realizes, however, that not 
all who seek higher education do so with the desire to become 
teachers or to earn a livelihood. For that considerable body of 
women who seek the broad culture to be derived from a familiarity 
with the world's best thought and achievement, liberal courses in 
the arts, sciences and in music are offered. The College thus endeav- 
ors to meet the cultural needs of the women of North Carolina and 
at the same time to offer such education as will promote the effi- 
ciency of the average woman's work, whatever her position and field. 

Students who agree to teach in the schools of North Carolina 
for two years are granted free tuition, and thus are able to reduce 
the net cost for laundry, board, and fees to $304.00 for the year. 
Students who do not wish to meet the conditions prescribed for 
free tuition, or who live outside the State, must pay tuition 
charges. Students who register in the music courses are also re- 
quired to pay tuition. 



24 The North Carolina College for Women 

The Institution includes the following divisions: The College 
of Liberal Arts, composed of (1) the faculty of languages, (2) the 
faculty of mathematics and science, (3) the faculty of the social 
sciences, (4) the department of health; and the School of Edu- 
cation, the School of Music, and the School of Home Economics. 
The College confers six degrees: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Science in Music, Bachelor of Science in Home Economics, Bache- 
lor of Science in Physical Education, Bachelor of Science in Com- 
merce, and Master of Arts. 

The North Carolina College for Women is a member of the 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern 
States, of the American Council on Education, of the Association 
of North Carolina Colleges, and of the American Association of 
Colleges; and its graduates have been granted full membership in 
the American Association of University Women. 

The management of the College is vested in a Board of Direc- 
tors, consisting of one member from each Congressional district, the 
first Board having been elected by the General Assembly of 1891. 
The State Superintendent of Public Instruction and the Governor 
of the State are, ex officio, additional members of the Board; and 
the Superintendent of Public Instruction acts as Vice-President 
and the Governor as President of the Board. 

In 1931, the General Assembly of North Carolina passed an Act 
to consolidate the University of North Carolina, the North Carolina 
State College of Agriculture and Engineering, and the North Caro- 
lina College for Women into the UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAR- 
OLINA. By the provisions of the Act, the North Carolina College 
for Women will, after July 1, 1932, be known as the Woman's Col- 
lege of the University of North Carolina. At that time, also, the 
Board of Trustees elected by the 1931 General Assembly will 
assume the management of the new University, and a Commission 
appointed by the Governor to work out plans for the consolidation 
of the component parts of the University will submit its report. 
Pending the bringing about of the unification provided for in the 
Act, the College has this year continued under its own plan of 
operation. 

The North Carolina College for Women is a part of the public 
school system. As a State institution, it desires to be of the greatest 
possible service to the entire people of North Carolina; and it 
would not, if it could, limit its patronage to a particular class or 
section. Every county has its proportionate number of appoint- 
ments, and the advantages of the institution are, to the extent of 
its capacity, open on similar terms to all. 

LOCATION 

The North Carolina College for Women is situated at Greens- 
boro, one of the largest and most progressive cities in the State. 



Buildings and Grounds 25 

Greensboro offers educational and cultural advantages superior to 
those found in many cities of twice its size. There are many 
churches, several private schools and colleges, adequate hospital 
facilities, and various other social and civic agencies. The pres- 
ence of many liberalizing and educational forces gives to the city 
an intellectual and cultural tone essential to the full development 
of young minds. The industrial life is diversified and prosperous, 
and the city's growth has been steady and sound. Since it is near 
the geographical center of the State, Greensboro is also the most 
accessible of all North Carolina cities. Railroads, bus lines, and 
State highways make travel easy and rapid. It is quite reasonable 
to state that in few cities of the South can a liberal and professional 
education be obtained at such small cost as in Greensboro, or in 
more satisfactory surroundings than those of the North Carolina 
College for Women. 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Since its establishment the College has made steady progress in 
material equipment, so that today the property comprises more 
than one hundred acres of improved and wooded land, forty-four 
buildings, ample room for recreational activities, and several miles 
of paved and improved walks. The monetary valuation of the 
entire College plant is more than $6,000,000. 

The Administration Building (1892) houses the chief adminis- 
trative offices. The President, the Secretary, the Treasurer, the 
Registrar, the Business Manager, and the Student Counselors have 
their offices there; and on the second and third floors are lecture 
rooms and instructors' offices. 

Little Guilford Hall (1895) is now the headquarters for the 
Vocational Director of the College and her staff ; and for the Insti- 
tute of Women's Professional Relations, a privately-endowed re- 
search organization sponsored by the American Association of Uni- 
versity Women and by the College. 

Students' Building (1901) contains an assembly hall with a 
seating capacity of eight hundred ; literary society halls and rooms ; 
offices of the Young Women's Christian Association; offices for 
student publications ; the book store ; the post office ; and store rooms 
for various student organizations. 

The Dining Rooms (1904), three large halls with a capacity of 
eighteen hundred, are connected through a large central serving 
room with the kitchens and cold storage plant. 

Spencer Building (1904) is a dormitory with accommodations 
for 345. 



26 The North Carolina College for Women 

The Library (1905) has a capacity of 100,000 volumes and 300 
readers. Room is provided for further expansion. Library hours 
extend from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. each week day. Every facility is 
provided the inquiring and diligent student, whether she wishes to 
read casually or to engage in research. 

Mclver Building (1908), named in honor of the founder of 
the College and its first President, contains one hundred and 
twenty-six lecture rooms, laboratories, and offices. 

The Infirmary (1912) contains fifty beds for students; offices 
for consultation, examination, and dispensary treatment; and a 
residence for nurses. 

Woman's Building (1912), dedicated by the General Assembly 
to the Women of the Confederacy, has dormitory accommodations 
for 66. 

Kirkland Hall (1914), named for Miss Sue May Kirkland, the 
first Lady Principal of the College, has accommodations for 66 
dormitory students. 

Anna Howard Shaw Building (1920), a dormitory, accommo- 
dates 104 students. 

Robert T. Gray Building (1921), named for Mr. Gray, a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors of the College from 1900 to 1912, is 
a dormitory with accommodations for 122. 

The Home Management House (1921), for students in the 
School of Home Economics, is equipped to give practical training 
in housekeeping, home-making, and the care of the house. 

Bailey Building (1922), a dormitory, named for Mr. T. B. 
Bailey, a member of the Board of Directors of the College from 
1902 to 1916, accommodates 122. 

Cotten Building (1922), a dormitory named for Mrs. Sally 
Cotten, of Greenville, accommodates 122. 

Hinshaw Building (1922), a dormitory named for Colonel G. 
W. Hinshaw, a member of the Board of Directors of the College 
from 1910 to 1918, accommodates 122 students. 

The Outdoor Gymnasium (1922), designed originally as an 
emergency arrangement, has a floor 50x90, with adequate athletic 
apparatus, including a marked-off basketball court. 

The Physical Education Building (1923), in addition to a main 
gymnasium and two smaller gymnasia, contains various rooms for 
lecture and remedial purposes, offices for instructors, examination 
and rest rooms, a swimming pool, a storage room, and dressing and 
shower booths. 

East Dormitory (1923) has accommodations for 122. 

West Dormitory (1923) has accommodations for 122. 

The Music Building (1924) contains an auditorium, sixteen 
class rooms, nine offices, and fifty practice rooms. 

Aycock Auditorium (1926) seats nearly 3,000 persons. The 
building contains, besides the large auditorium for College assem- 



Buildings and Grounds 27 

blies and entertainments, four reception rooms, an assembly room 
for artists, and cloak rooms. 

Curry Building (1926) houses the Training School and the 
School of Education. There are numerous rooms for College classes 
and for the grades; a large demonstration room; an auditorium 
seating about five hundred; and many offices. It is one of the 
largest and most handsomely appointed buildings on the campus, 
affording superb facilities not only for the college classes, but for 
practice teaching in the grades and high school. 

Mary Foust Hall (1927), a dormitory named by the alumnae in 
memory of the daughter of President Foust, accommodates 148. 

Guilford Hall (1927) is a duplicate of Mary Foust Hall. 

Home Economics Building (1927) houses the School of Home 
Economics. There is a kitchen and storeroom for training in insti- 
tutional management; a cafeteria; a nursery school; space for an 
animal room, and an art laboratory ; class rooms ; laboratories ; and 
a lecture room seating about three hundred. In all there are 
seventeen teaching and general units, and nine offices. 

Besides the buildings named above, the College owns a number 
of service and residence buildings. 

OUTDOOR THEATRE 

The open-air theatre in Peabody Park has a seating capacity of 
three thousand. The utilization of natural advantages, such as 
native trees and running water, and a picturesque hillside, give it 
dignity and beauty. 

PHYSICS LABORATORIES 

The general laboratory is a large, well-furnished room provided 
with all necessary equipment for courses in General Physics. A 
smaller laboratory room is equipped for advanced, specialized 
courses. In connection are a dark room, a large lecture amphi- 
theatre, a preparation room, apparatus rooms, a mechanician's shop, 
and offices. The laboratories and lecture table are equipped with 
pipe lines for gas, compressed air, and "vacuum," and are wired 
for distribution from a switchboard, of direct current from storage 
batteries and dynamo, and of alternating current. 

CHEMISTRY LABORATORIES 

The large general laboratory is furnished with all necessary 
individual and special equipment for courses in General Chemistry. 
An advanced laboratory for analytical work is equally well equipped 
for special courses. In connection is a stock-room, providing space 
for glassware and chemical supplies, a balance room with several 
fine balances for analytical work, lecture rooms, and offices. 



28 The North Carolina College for Women 

BIOLOGY LABORATORIES 

The laboratories of the Department of Biology include one large 
well-equipped room for the general or beginning course; two for 
Botany; two for Zoology; and one each for Physiology and Bac- 
teriology. Two preparation rooms for the general Biology and 
Physiology courses, a dark room, and four stock-rooms are part of 
the physical equipment of the department. Special apparatus 
includes microtomes, sterilizers, electrical refrigerators, paraffin 
baths, basal metabolism equipment, an incinerator, and an incu- 
bator room with electric heat and automatic control. The Depart- 
ment has nearly two hundred compound microscopes, also binocu- 
lars and immersion lenses. Museum material and special equip- 
ment for advanced courses are also provided. 

HOME ECONOMICS LABORATORY 

The Home Economics Department has well-equipped labora- 
tories for Cookery, Clothing, Applied Art, and Household Manage- 
ment. The Cookery laboratory is fitted with specially designed 
desks, which have porcelain enamel tops arranged in the block sys- 
tem. The second food laboratory has the unit-system equipment. 
A dining room, pantry, and home kitchen are fully fitted up for 
meal preparation and serving. The Applied Art laboratory is well 
lighted, has individual drawing tables, and adequate storage space. 
A lantern is available for the Art courses. The Clothing labora- 
tories have special sewing tables, sewing machines of different 
types, dress forms, and all necessary small equipment. A brick 
practice house, in attractive Colonial style, is adequately and 
artistically furnished so that practice in all phases of household 
management can be given under right conditions. 

PLAY PRODUCTION LABORATORY 

A large room in the basement of Aycock Auditorium is used by 
students in play production for designing, constructing, and paint- 
ing scenery, for sewing stage curtains and draperies, for experi- 
menting in stage lighting and theatrical make-up, and for rehears- 
ing plays. The ceiling is a network of blocks, pulleys, and lines 
for hoisting scenery and for setting the room as a stage for 
rehearsals. A four-burner gas stove serves as a melting pot for 
glues, paints, and other substances used in water-color mixing. 
There is a big tailor's sewing machine, capable of taking the 
heaviest fabrics. A paint frame for scenic drops covers one entire 
end of the room. An adequate set of carpenter's tools, a work- 
bench, and similar equipment, serve in the construction of scenery 
frames. Modern stage electrical equipment of every type is used 
in the lighting experiments. The laboratory is a combination 
scenic studio and experimental workshop. 



Buildings and Grounds 29 

PSYCHOLOGY LABORATORIES 

The psychology laboratories include a large room suitable for 
sections in elementary and advanced laboratory courses, a special 
room for mental testing or clinical examinations, a combined appa- 
ratus room and shop, and appropriate adjoining lecture rooms. 
These laboratories are equipped with suitable furniture and appa- 
ratus to use in the laboratory courses. There is also equipment 
for use in the study of special problems and for class demonstra- 
tions. The testing room is equipped with materials needed in the 
common mental testing procedures. The equipment for testing 
children is especially adequate. 

HISTORICAL MUSEUM 

The Department of History is collecting material for a Histori- 
cal Museum, or Hall of History. Through the co-operation of 
Col. F. A. Olds, of the Hall of History, Raleigh, N. C, a good begin- 
ning has been made in this work. Colonel Olds presented to the 
Museum several hundred valuable and interesting articles. Since 
that time the students of the College and others have contributed 
liberally to the collection, so that there are now more than five 
hundred relics. Glass cases are provided, and articles are carefully 
protected. 

The collection contains valuable Indian relics, an especially 
valuable collection of Colonial currency, Confederate money, 
objects illustrating the manners and customs of the people, rare 
pictures and books, pamphlets, old newspapers, war and other 
relics. It is the intention to make a specialty of articles illustrat- 
ing the life and work of the women of North Carolina. 



DIRECTIONS TO NEW STUDENTS 

1. The attention of the student is directed to the College cal- 
endar. 

2. When making application for admission, the applicant 
should not fail to give her county. 

3. Special attention is called to the article on Requirements for 
Admission. 

4. The expenses, with dates of advance payments, are given 
elsewhere under the head "Expenses." Consult the index. 

5. The rooms in the dormitories have been comfortably fitted 
up. Each student is expected to bring for her own use the follow- 
ing articles: One pillow and two pairs of pillowcases, two pairs 



30 The North Carolina College for Women 

of sheets, two pairs of blankets, two counterpanes, six towels, one 
drinking cup, and a teaspoon. Only single beds are used. 

Each student must be provided with overshoes and an umbrella, 
plainly marked with her full name; and a coat, or raincoat, for 
protection during stormy weather. 

6. Every applicant for admission to the College who has not 
already been successfully vaccinated for smallpox within two years 
should be vaccinated at least two weeks before leaving home. She 
should send her certificate of vaccination by mail to Dr. Gove or 
bring it to the infirmary when she enters college. 

7. Every student is required to purchase a gymnasium outfit. 
These outfits may not be provided at home, but must be purchased 
under the direction of the Instructor in Physical Education. 

8. If, after examining this catalogue carefully, the applicant 
desires further information, she should address Dr. Julius I. Foust, 
Greensboro, N. C. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants for admission to the College should be sixteen years 
old and in good health. 

Students may be admitted by certificate or by examination. 

Applicants to be admitted by certificate must be graduates of 
standard high schools. 

Applicants to be admitted by examination must have completed 
the equivalent of a four-year high school course and must pass the 
Uniform College Entrance Examinations arranged by the North 
Carolina College Conference. 

All applicants must furnish complete high school records on 
blanks supplied by the College and and must be recommended by 
the high school. 

It must be clearly understood that admission to the College does 
not necessarily mean admission to candidacy for a degree. 

In order to be admitted as a candidate for a degree the appli- 
cant must meet the specific requirements laid down for that degree. 
Where there are deficiencies, they must be made good before the 
student may register for her Sophomore year. 

The deficiencies allowed may be in Foreign Language, Mathe- 
matics, or History. A student wishing to enter with a deficiency 
of one unit in Plane Geometry or History may be admitted with 
the understanding that the deficiency must be made up in one year. 

A student offering only two units of a Foreign Language and 
wishing to enter Group II of the A.B. course may do so by taking 
three years of a Foreign Language in College instead of two. 









Requirements for Admission 31 

Blank forms for certificates will be furnished on application to 
the Secretary. 

SUBJECTS ACCEPTED FOR ENTRANCE 

The subjects in which credit for admission to the College may be offered 
and the maximum amount of credit acceptable in each subject are given in the 
following table : 

UNITS 

English 4 

History and other Social Sciences 4 

. Mathematics 4 

Greek 3 

*Latin 4 

*Freneh 3 

*German 3 

*Spanish 2 

Biology 1 or .5 

Botany 1 or .5 

Chemistry 1 or .5 

Physics 1 or .5 

Physiology .5 

Zoology 1 or .5 

General Science 1 or .5 

Physiography 1 or .5 

Drawing 1 or .5 

Civics 1 or .5 

Bible 2 

Music 2 

Expression .5 

VOCATIONAL SUBJECTS 

Not more than three elective units will be accepted from this list of 
vocational subjects: 

UNITS 

Commercial Geography .5 

General Agriculture 2 

Bookkeeping 1 

Commercial Arithmetic 1 

Stenography 1 

Manual Training 2 

Home Economics 2 



* Credit will not be given for less than two years of a foreign language. 



32 The North Carolina College for Women 



PRESCRIBED REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for admission to candidacy for the different degrees 
are as follows: 

A. THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 

The Degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

There are three courses of study leading to this degree. 
The following tables indicate the requirements for entrance to these 
courses: 

FOR ENTRANCE TO GROUP I 

UNITS 

English 3 

Mathematics 2% 

Latin 3 

French, Spanish, or German 2 

History 2 

♦Elective : 2% 

15 
FOR ENTRANCE TO GROUP II 

UNITS 

English 3 

Mathematics 2% 

Latin, French, or German 2 J or 3 

or, two units each in two languages (Latin, 

French, German, Spanish). 

History 2 

♦Elective 5% or 4% 

15 
FOR ENTRANCE TO GROUP III 

UNITS 

English 3 

Mathematics 2% 

Latin, French, Spanish, or German 2 

Science 1 

History 2 

♦Elective 4% 

15 
The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. 

UNITS 

English 3 

Mathematics 2y 2 

Latin, French, Spanish, or German 2 

Science 1 

History 2 

*Elective ±y 2 

15 



| Students offering only two units of a foreign language for entrance to this group 
will be required to take three years of a foreign language in college instead of two. 

* The elective units in each case must be chosen from the list of "Subjects Accepted 
for Entrance." 



Prescribed Requirements 33 

B. THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Music. 

UNITS 

English 3 

Mathematics 2% 

Language '• 3 

History 2 

Music 2 

♦Elective 2% 

15 
C. THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics. 

UNITS 

English 3 

Mathematics 2% 

Latin, French, Spanish, or German 2 

Science 1 

History 2 

♦Elective 4 

15 



* The elective units in each case must be chosen from the list of "Subjects Accepted 
for Entrance." 



SPECIFICATIONS OF THE REQUIREMENTS 
FOR ADMISSION 

MATHEMATICS: 2% units. 

Algebra: l 1 /^ units. Factors, common divisors and multiples, fractions, 
simple equations with applications to problems, involution and evolution, radi- 
cals and equations containing radicals, quadratic equations, ratio and pro- 
portion. 

Geometry: 1 unit. Plane Geometry five books. 

Solid Geometry: y 2 unit. Elective credit. 

Trigonometry : y 2 unit. Elective credit. 

HISTORY: 2 units. The requirements^in History may be met by offer- 
ing two of the following courses. The examinations will be based on the 
material included in the books suggested, or their equivalent. 

1. American History: Muzzey; Forman; West; Stephenson; Beard; Fite; 
Fish. 

2. English History: Andrews; Walker; Cheyney; or Coman & Kendall. 

3. Ancient History: West; Botsford; Webster; Westermann; Robinson; 
or McKinley, Howland and Dann. 

4. Medieval and Modern History: Robinson; Bourne; West. 

5. Modern History: Robinson and Beard; Hayes and Moon; Webster; 
West. 

Two elective units may be offered from the history group. 



34 The North Carolina College for Women 

ENGLISH: 3 units. The completion of the standard four year high 
school course in English. 

LATIN : 2, 3, or 4 units. To satisfy the requirement of two units in Latin, 
the student must have had competent instruction in the subject, involving the 
Eoman pronunciation, careful attention to quantity and accent, systematic 
drill in grammar, with daily exercises in prose composition, and the reading 
of some elementary reader, together with four books of Caesar's Gallic Wars, 
or their equivalent. Bennett's Latin Composition, through chapter 27, will 
serve to indicate the amount of composition "required. 

Students who wish credit for three units of Latin must present, in addition 
to the foregoing, six of Cicero's orations — the four against Catiline, the 
Manilian Law, and Arehias. Bennett's Latin Composition should be com- 
pleted. In reading and in composition, equivalents satisfactory to the head 
of the Latin Department will be accepted. 

Entrance credit amounting to an additional unit will be given for the first 
six books of the Mneid and so much prosody as relates to accent, versifica- 
tion in general, and dactylic hexameter. 

FRENCH : 2 or 3 units. 

I. One unit. This amount includes: (1) careful drill in pronunciation; 
(2) rudiments of grammar, with particular attention to simple idiomatic con- 
structions, conjugation of the regular and the more common irregular verbs, 
and the simpler pronominal forms; (3) constant practice in the translation 
from English into French; (4) writing French from dictation; (5) the read- 
ing of from 100 to 175 pages of graduated texts, with frequent practice in 
reproducing in French easy variations of the text read. 

II. Two units. In addition to the work of the first unit, this demands 
(1) a continued and thorough study of grammar, including the subjunctive and 
infinitive uses, more detailed work in pronominal construction and word order, 
with constant application to the construction of sentences; (2) the reading of 
from 300 to 400 pages of easy modern prose, in the form of stories, plays, 
or historical or biographical sketches; (3) continued practice in translating 
into French variations of the texts read; (4) frequent summaries, sometimes 
oral and sometimes written, of portions of the text already read. 

III. Three units. This work comprises, in addition to I and II, the read- 
ing of from 400 to 600 pages of standard French of increasing difficulty, a 
portion of which should be in dramatic form; the study of a grammar of 
modern completeness; more advanced work in translation into French, and 
free composition; frequent practice in giving French paraphrases, abstracts, 
or reproductions, either oral or written. 

GERMAN: 2 or 3 unts. 

I. One unit. This includes: (1) careful drill in pronunciation; (2) mastery 
of the following points in grammar; the declension of the definite and indefi- 
nite articles, the demonstrative and possessive adjective, the noun, the adjec- 
tives, the personal pronoun, the relative pronoun, and the interrogative pro- 
noun; the principal parts of about fifty strong verbs; the conjugation of 
verbs in the present, imperfect, perfect, pluperfect, and future of the indica- 
tive, and three forms of the imperative; the simple tenses of the modals; the 
irregular weak verbs; the reflexive verb; verb with separable and inseparable 
prefixes; the most common prepositions governing the dative, those governing 
the accusative, and both the dative and the accusative; word order, normal, 
inverted, and transposed; (3) the reading of from 75 to 100 pages of simple 
German; (4) training in answering questions in German on the reading mate- 
rial and ability to reproduce in German easy portions of the stories read; 
(5) about six short poems or songs should be memorized. 

II. Two units. In addition to the foregoing, the following requirements 
are made: (1) mastery of the following chapters of grammar: Comparison 



Specifications of the Requirements for Admission 35 

of adjectives, pronominal adverbs, the demonstrative pronoun, the use of 
modals in perfect tenses, the passive voice, the subjunctive of indirect dis- 
course and unreal condition, verbs requiring the dative and prepositions 
governing the genitive ease; (2) the composition should consist of free repro- 
duction of some of the narrative read; (3) the vocabulary should be extended 
by the use of synonyms and antonyms; (4) ability to translate sections too 
difficult to reproduce in German or to explain in simple German; (5) the read- 
ing of from 150 to 200 pages of modern prose of the difficulty of Leander 's 
' ' Traumereien, ' ' "Deutsche Heimat, " and "Immense"; (6) about six 
poems should be memorized. 

III. Three units. In addition to I and II the work should consist of: (1) 
constant review of the grammar; (2) reading of from 300 to 350 pages of 
modern prose of the difficulty of Wildenbruch 's "Das edle Blut, " Riehl's 
"Das Spielmann's Kind," and Eichendorff 's "Der Taugenichts"; (3) the 
study of the easier lyrics and ballads; (4) Schiller's "Tell" should be reserved 
for the last half of the third year; (5) questions on the reading assignments; 
(6) brief summaries of portions of the texts; (7) extension of the vocabulary 
by means of synonyms, antonyms, and related words. 

SPANISH: 2 units. 

One unit. This amount includes: (1) careful drill in pronunciation; (2) 
foundation principles of grammar, with particular attention to simple idiomatic 
constructions, conjugation of the regular and the more important irregular 
verbs, and pronominal constructions; (3) constant practice in the translation 
of English into Spanish; (4) translation of simple Spanish when spoken; 
(5) writing Spanish from dictation; (6) the reading of from 100 to 125 
pages of graduated text, with practice in reproducing in Spanish easy varia- 
tions of the text read. 

BIOLOGY, BOTANY, OE ZOOLOGY: 1 or V 2 unit. One unit represents 
a year's work with laboratory included. Laboratory notebooks should be kept. 

PHYSIOLOGY: % unit. 

PHYSICS: 1 or y 2 unit. 

CHEMISTRY: 1 or % unit. 

AGRICULTURE: 1 or % unit. 

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY: 1 or % unit. 

GENERAL SCIENCE: 1 or V 2 unit, 

HOME ECONOMICS: 1 or 2 units. To obtain one unit's credit the 
candidate must have had a course the equivalent of two laboratory periods of 
two hours each (three forty-minute periods) and two recitation periods of 
forty minutes each for thirty-two weeks. As now given in the high schools 
the work here called for is usually apportioned to two years. 

Two units' entrance credit for home economics will be given for both the 
A.B. and the B.S. degees if the following conditions are met: 

1. That home economics shall be given in the high school in ninety-minute 
periods for five days a week for two years or its equivalent. Forty-five min- 
ute periods are not considered equivalent. 

2. The subject matter covered shall be that outlined in the state course of 
study for two years' work. 

MUSIC: 1 or 2 units. One unit of music may be offered as an elective 
for entrance to any college course. To satisfy the requirements of one unit 
credit in any course except that of B.S. in Music a student must offer one of 
the following: 



36 The North Carolina College for Women 

a. Rudiments of Music, and Harmony: Not less than thirty-two weeks' 
work, of five forty-minute recitations each week. 

Suggested Texts: Music Notation and Terminology — K. "W. Gehrkens, 
(A. S. Barnes and Co.) and Harmony for the Ear, Eye and Keyboard, Arthur 
Heacox. (O. Ditson Co.) 

b. Harmony and History of Music: Not less than thirty-two weeks' work, 
of rive forty-minute recitations each week. It is suggested that three recita- 
tions each week can be devoted to the study of notation and harmony, as sug- 
gested for Course I, and the remaining two days to be used in a careful study 
of history of music, including, if possible, some experience in intelligent listen- 
ing to representative composition of the period or composer under considera- 
tion. A well-kept notebook for the work in music history is strongly urged. 

Suggested Texts: For Harmony — the same as for Course I, History — 
History of Music — Cecil Forsyth. (Art Publication Society.) 

c. Elementary Theory: Together with a usable knowledge of piano, or 
violin. This elementary theory must include, as a minimum, a knowledge of 
the rudiments of music, scales (major and minor), intervals and staff notation, 
and musical terms and expression marks in common use. In the practical music 
presented for this unit of credit, the student must offer one of the following: 

Piano: The ability to play effectively the Sonatinas of Clementi and 
Kuhlau, or compositions of like grade, and the ability to play well standard 
church hymns. 

Violin: The ability to play well scales and compositions covering the first 
three positions. 

In Piano: Combined with the foregoing Theory and Ear Training require- 
ments, there should be a practical knowledge of the various kinds of touch; 
the ability to play all major and minor scales in similar and contrary motion 
in sixteenth notes (at metronome speed of quarter note — 84) ; the major and 
minor arpeggios slowly and clearly; the ability to play with due regard to 
tempo, phrasing and expression the studies of Czerny, op. 209; Book I; Little 
Preludes, by Bach; Haydn, Sonata in G; Dussek, Rondo in G; Grieg, Album 
Leaf in A, op. 28, or standard compositions of like grade. The candidate must 
be able to play at sight hymn tunes, chorals, and compositions of the grade of 
Clementi 's and Kuhlau 's Sonatinas. 

Students may offer equivalents for studies and pieces mentioned subject 
to the approval of the head of the School of Music. 

In Organ: To major in the organ department the candidate must have 
completed the work of the Freshman year in piano. The organ course covers 
three years. 

In Violin: Candidates to major in the violin course must possess a knowl- 
edge of general musical theory as outlined above and an ability to play cor- 
rectly selections from Kayser, Thirty-six Studies, Book 1, or other works of 
same standards and difficulty. 

In Public School Music: To major in the Public School Music Department 
the candidate must have an acceptable singing voice, and must have completed 
the work of the Freshman year in the School of Music. 



ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Students entering with advanced standing must fulfill the re- 
quirements for admission to the Freshman Class. 

Applicants for admission from other colleges should send to the 
Registrar: (1) an official statement of entrance and college records, 
(2) a catalogue of the institution from which they transfer, marked 



Admission to Advanced Standing 37 

to indicate the courses taken, and (3) a letter of honorable dis- 
missal. The official transcript of the applicant's entrance and col- 
lege record of work to the end of the first semester of the year prior 
to her transfer should be sent to the Registrar before May 1. This 
certificate should include a statement of the subjects being pursued 
during the second semester, together with the number of hours of 
credit to be secured in each. The letter of honorable dismissal and 
the final record of the second semester should be sent to the Regis- 
trar before July 1. 

In estimating the credit to be allowed, the standing of the college 
previously attended and the quality as well as the quantity of the 
student's work will receive consideration. Should the student's 
work during her first year at this college prove unsatisfactory, the 
amount of credit allowed may be reduced. 

Laboratory notebooks must be presented for credit for science 
not done at a standard college. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

COURSES LEADING TO DEGREES 

The College offers several groups of study leading to the fol- 
lowing degrees : Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Master 
of Arts. All students must take one of these regular degree courses 
unless given special permission to take an irregular course. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Candidates for the A.B. degree must meet the requirements of 
one of the following groups of studies. The group selected must 
correspond to the subjects offered for entrance. 

The following is the minimum requirement for all candidates 
for the A.B. degree — 122 semester hours credit, which must include : 

*English 14 semester hours 

One Foreign Language 12 semester hours 

History 6 semester hours 

Natural Science 6 semester hours 

Major Subject, from 21 to 33 semester hours 

Related Minor 12 semester hours 

Physical Education 2 semester hours 

In addition to the 120 semester hours of academic work required, 
each candidate for graduation must have credit for six semesters' 
work in Physical Education, for which two semester hours' credit 
is given. 



* Twelve hours for B.S. in H.E. and B.S. in Music. 



38 



The North Carolina College for Women 



COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 

FRESHMAN" YEAR 



SEM. 
GROUP I HRS. 

English 8 

Mathematics, 
Chemistry, 
Physics or 

Biology 6 

Latin 6 

French, 
German, or 

Spanish 6 

Health 4 



30 



SEM. 
GROUP II HRS. 

English 8 

Mathematics, 
Chemistry, 
Physics or 

Biology 6 

Latin, 
French, 
German, or 

Spanish 6 

History 6 

Health 4 

30 



GROUP III 



SEM. 
HRS. 



English 8 

Mathematics or 

Physics 6 

Latin, 
French, 
German, or 

Spanish 6 

Biology, or 

Chemistry 6 

Health 4 



30 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



SEM. 
GROUP I HRS. 

English 6 

Latin 6 

French, 
German or 

Spanish 6 

A subject in Divi- 
sion II or III .... 6 
Elective 6 



30 



SEM. 
GROUP II HRS- 

English 6 

Latin, 
French, 
German or 

Spanish 6 

History, 
Economics, 
Sociology,** or a 
Second Language . . 6 
A subject in Divi- 
sion III*** 6 

Elective 6 

30 



SEM. 
GROUP III HRS. 

English 6 

Latin, 

French, 

German or 

Spanish 6 

Two subjectstt in Di- 
vision III and 
IV** 12 

A subject in Divi- 
sion II or IV** . . 6 



30 



Sophomore Electives: tForeign Language, History, Biology, Chemistry, 
Physics, Mathematics, Education, English, Home Economics, Public School 
Music, Economics, Psychology, 21-22. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Candidates for the A.B. degree must complete 60 semester 
hours of work in their Junior and Senior years, as follows : 

Every candidate for an A.B. degree must choose a major sub- 
ject for concentrated study from a department in Divisions I, II, 
or III. (See "Major and Elective Divisions" following.) This 
major subject shall comprise not less than 21 nor more than 33 



1 1 One of these must be in Chemistry if not already chosen in Freshman year. 
** Approval of the head of the department must be obtained. 

t Language chosen in the Freshman year must be continued in the Sophomore year. 
*** Except Psychology 21-22. 



Requirements for the Bachelor's Degree 39 

semester hours. It lies within the discretion of the head of the 
department to prescribe part of the major work in allied depart- 
ments. A minor subject of 6 semester hours each year shall be 
continued through the Junior and Senior years. Additional elec- 
tive studies sufficient to meet the requirements of 30 semester hours 
a year may then be added. 

MAJOR AND ELECTIVE DIVISIONS FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS 

Division I : Language and Literature 
Department of English. 
Department of Latin. 

Department of Eomance Languages and Literature. 
Department of German. 

Division II: History, Education, and Social Sciences 

Department of History. 

Department of Education. 

Department of Economics and Sociology. 

Division III: Mathematics and Natural Sciences 

Department of Mathematics. 
Department of Biology. 
Department of Chemistry. 
Department of Physics. 
Department of Psychology. 

Division IV : Home Economics 

Home Economics 2 and 11; Art 1, 22, 23, 29, 30, and 35, not to exceed 
twelve semester hours. The electives chosen are subject to the approval of the 
Deans of the College of Liberal Arts and the School of Home Economics. 

Additional Junior and Senior Electives 

Music 1-2, 11-12, 13-14, 27-28, not to exceed twelve semester hours. The 
electives chosen are subject to the approval of the Deans of the College of 
Liberal Arts and the School of Music. 



TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

Candidates for the A.B. degree who wish also to secure certificates to teach 
in the schools of North Carolina must fulfill certain requirements: 

An applicant for a High School Certificate must choose as her major and 
minor the subjects which she plans to teach. She must also take 15 semester 
hours of Education. More than 15 hours will not be credited toward a degree. 
The remaining elective hours (12 semester hours or less) must be chosen from 
the courses offered in the College of Liberal Arts. 

An applicant for a Primary Certificate is allowed a maximum of 18 semes- 
ter hours of Education. She must take 23 semester hours of work in other 
departments as prescribed by the State Department of Education. The 
remaining 19 semester hours must be chosen from Junior-Senior courses offered 
in the College of Liberal Arts. 

An applicant for a Grammar Grade Certificate is allowed a maximum of 
19 semester hours of Education. She must take 23 semester hours of work 
in other departments as prescribed by the State Department of Education. 



40 The North Carolina College for Women 

The remaining 18 semester hours must be chosen from Junior-Senior courses 
offered in the College of Liberal Arts. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Candidates for this degree must satisfactorily complete the requirements 
of the Freshman and Sophomore years of the A.B. course before enrolling in 
courses in Library Science. 

COURSES LEADING- TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

1. Bachelor of Science in Music 
See School of Music. 

2. Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 
See School of Home Economics. 

3. Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 
See Department of Health. 

4. Bachelor of Science in Commerce 

See School of Education (pages 128-129) for Commercial Teachers, and De- 
partment of the Social Sciences — Commerce and Secretarial Training 
(page 98) — for Secretarial Course. 



MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE 

See the Graduate Division. 



REGISTRATION 

FRESHMAN WEEK 



In order to aid new students to become adjusted to college life 
as quickly as possible, the College has established Freshman "Week. 
The program of this week includes mental and physical measure- 
ments, pre-registration counseling, special lectures on student tra- 
ditions, library tours, and social gatherings, in addition to the reg- 
istration for courses. This program begins with a meeting of all 
new students in Aycock Auditorium at 9 :00 a.m. on Tuesday, 
September 13. All new students except Commercial students are 
required to be present at this and all other appointments compris- 
ing the program of Freshman Week. 

Freshman, Commercial, and Transfer students will register on 
September 15. 

All former students will register September 16. 

A fee of $2.00 per day (maximum $5.00) will be charged for 
late registration. 



Academic Regulations 41 

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 

Not later than May 1 of the Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior 
years, each student shall hand to the Registrar a copy of her pro- 
gram of study for the coming year. This program must have the 
official endorsement of the student's Adviser or of the head of the 
department represented by the major study, and in the case of 
Sophomores and Juniors, of the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences. 

The student herself is responsible for fulfilling all requirements 
for the degree for which she is registered. 

Every candidate for a Bachelor's degree must conform to the 
residence requirements of this college. 

A student electing Language as a general Sophomore or Junior 
elective will be required to continue the language a second year, 
except that credit will be given for one year of Italian. 

CHANGE OF COURSE 

Changes in course should not be made after registration except 
in unusual cases. For one week following registration students 
may make necessary changes by presenting to the Registrar a 
change of course card signed by her Adviser. 

Students are not permitted to begin a course later than one week 
after registration. 

No student is officially dropped from a course until she has pre- 
sented to the Registrar a "change of course" card signed by her 
Adviser. 

A fee of $1.00 will be charged for a change in schedule after the 
regular day of registration. 

CREDITS 

No student may receive credit for any course for which she 
has not officially registered and presented to the instructor a card 
of admission from the Registrar. Students are not allowed to 
attend classes as auditors. 

Credit obtained by examination on new work during any term 
is counted as regular work in determining the amount of work car- 
ried by any student. 

No credit will be given for correspondence or extension work 
taken while a student is in residence at this College. 

No student may register for more than 16 hours of work in any 
semester, except under the following regulations : 

Permission to carry more than 16 hours must be obtained by 
request from the Petitions Committee, and is based upon the stu- 
dent 's record for the preceding semester. 



42 The North Carolina College for Women 

An average of C is required for 17 hours, and an average of B 
for 18 hours. 

All permissions for extra work are subject to the approval of 
the Resident Physician. 

No student may carry less than 12 hours of work. 

Students desiring to apply toward their degrees work taken at 
the summer sessions of other colleges should confer with the Regis- 
trar of this College for permission to take such courses. Credit 
will not be promised for courses not so approved. 

SUMMER SESSION AND EXTENSION CREDITS 

Summer session students (other than those who have matricu- 
lated during the regular year of the College) who are planning to 
apply their summer-session work towards a degree, must file a 
record of their entrance credits with the Registrar of the College 
previous to matriculation. 

In general, students who wish to apply the summer-session work 
towards a degree shall fulfill the prerequisites laid down in the 
regular catalogue. 

Not more than one-fourth of the requirement for a degree may 
be done by Extension work, and not more than eight semester hours 
may be done in any one year. 

Extension students desiring to apply the credit earned toward 
a degree must conform to the entrance requirements of the College. 

All questions of credits shall be referred to the Registrar and 
the Committee on Advanced Standing. 

CLASSIFICATION 

An entrance deficiency prevents a student from being classed 
higher than a Freshman. 

A student who is carrying a required Freshman subject or who 
has not completed all required Freshman work, may not be classed 
higher than a Sophomore. 

If at the opening of the Fall semester a student is carrying at 
least sixteen hours, and lacks not more than thirty-two semester 
hours of the one hundred and twenty-two semester hours required 
for graduation, she is classed a Senior. 

If a student is carrying at least sixteen hours and lacks not 
more than sixty -four semester hours, she is classed a Junior. 

If a student is carrying at least sixteen hours and lacks not 
more than ninety-six semester hours, she is classed a Sophomore. 

A student who lacks more than ninety-six hours, is classed a 
Freshman. 



Academic Regulations 43 

EXAMINATIONS 

Every student is required to take an examination, if one is 
given, on every course for which she is registered. No examinations 
will be given except during the three regular examination periods 
of the year : September 14, and at the end of each semester. 

A fee of $1.00 will be charged for every examination not taken 
at the regular time assigned unless the applicant can present an 
excuse from the College Physician to the Registrar. All requests 
for such examinations must be made in writing to the Registrar. 

Examinations for the removal of conditions and for advanced 
standing before the opening of the Fall semester will be held Sep- 
tember 14, 1932. 

Requests for re-examinations must be made not later than the 
following times : 

September 1, for re-examinations to be taken September 14. 

November 30, for re-examinations to be taken at the end of the 
first semester. 

April 30, for re-examinations to be taken at the end of the sec- 
ond semester. 

Blanks on which to apply for Fall re-examinations are sent 
from the Registrar 's office during August. In November and April 
the student must file a regular petition for re-examinations to be 
given at the close of the first and second semesters respectively. 

An E may be removed by re-examination before the beginning 
of the corresponding semester of the next year in which the student 
is in residence. At the discretion of the instructor a condition 
received in the first half of a year course may also be removed by 
obtaining a grade of C in the last half of the course. If not 
removed, an E automatically becomes F. Students receiving a 
grade F must repeat the course to receive any credit for the course. 

The work for which an I has been given must be completed 
before the beginning of the corresponding semester of the next year 
in which the student is in residence ; otherwise the I automatically 
becomes an F. 

REPORTS 

A report of the student 's work is mailed to the parent or guard- 
ian at the end of each semester. A report is sent to each student 
at the end of the first semester. The reports are based upon the fol- 
lowing system of marking : 

A. Excellent. 

B. Good. 

C. Average. 

D. Lowest passing mark. 

E. Conditioned. 

F. Failure. 

I. Incomplete. 



44 The North Carolina College for Women 

Students must attain a grade of D to pass in any course. Grade 
E' indicates that the student is Conditioned, but will be given 
another opportunity to remove the deficiency. An F may be 
removed only by repeating the course. 

STATEMENTS OF CREDITS 

Only one full statement of work and credit recorded for each 
student registered will be furnished without charge. Additional 
copies will be made only on receipt of a fee of one dollar ($1.00) to 
cover clerical expense involved. 

ENTRANCE DEFICIENCIES 

Graduates of approved high schools who offer the required fif- 
teen units may be admitted to the College. To be admitted as a 
candidate for a degree, the student must meet the specific require- 
ments laid down for that degree and for the group which she 
chooses. If there are deficiencies, they must be made good before 
the student may register for her Sophomore year. 

ATTENDANCE 

Regular attendance upon all College duties is required of all 
students. 

All excuses to dormitory students on account of illness are 
granted by the College Physician. 

Resident students ill at their own homes should communicate 
with the Resident Physician before returning to campus, and 
should report at the Infirmary within twenty-four hours after 
their return, bringing a certificate of professional attendance signed 
by their home physician. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Not fewer than 45 of the last 60 semester hours required for 
the A.B. or B.S. degree shall be done at the North Carolina College 
for Women. Of these 45 semester hours, at least 30 shall be done 
in the regular sessions of the College from September to June. In 
general 12 of these hours shall be devoted to subjects in the depart- 
ment of the student's major interest. 

This does not apply to students who have successfully completed 
three years ' work in a standard college and whose credits have been 
accepted by this College. 

The principle of the exercise of the "professional option' ' with 
regard to the fourth year's work has been adopted. 



Academic Regulations 45 

EXCLUSION FROM COLLEGE 

During the first semester that a student is enrolled here, she 
must pass six hours of work to remain in College. Every semester 
after the first, a student must pass nine hours to remain in College 
or to be readmitted. This regulation may be waived at the discre- 
tion of the Academic Board. 

This regulation does not take account of work that a student 
proposes to do during the summer session. 

WITHDRAWALS 

Every student who withdraws from College after registration 
must fill out a card for that purpose in the Registrar 's office. Until 
this is done, a student is not considered as officially withdrawn from 
the College, and no transcript of her record or statement of her 
attendance at College will be given her. 



EXPENSES 

REGULAR COURSE 



By the Charter of the Institution, board must be furnished in 
its dormitories at actual cost. Since there is no possible profit in 
board, no risk of loss can be taken. It is, therefore, necessary that 
all bills be paid in advance. No exceptions can be made. The 
Board of Directors instructs that sight drafts be made for all bills 
not paid when due. 

Board in dormitories (9 months) $160.00 

Laundry 25.00 

$185.00 

Fuel and lights 30.00 

Room rent (9 months) 35.00 

Registration fee 15.00 

Fee for medical attention and medicine 7.00 

Library fee 5.00 

Entertainment fee 5.00 

Janitor 's service 10.00 

Students ' activities fees 7.00* 

Physical Education fee 5.00 

$119.00 

Total, exclusive of tuition 304.00 

Tuition 45.00 

Total, including tuition $349.00 

In addition to the amounts listed above, every student must 
purchase a gymnasium outfit, costing $9.00. Commercial students 
are charged $8.00 for gymnasium suit. 

* $1.50 of this amount is for subscription to "The Carolinian." 



46 The North Carolina College for Women 

The payments for the regular charges and fees will be due as 
follows, in advance : 

For students who board in the dormitories and have free tuition: 

On entrance $120.00 

November 15 70.00 

February 1 60.00 

April 1 54.00 

$304.00 

For students who board in dormitories and pay tuition: 

On entrance $135.00 

November 15 80.00 

February 1 70.00 

April 1 64.00 

$349.00 

For students who have free tuition and do not board in dormitories : 

On entrance $ 50.00 

February 1 25.00 

— $ 75.00 

For students who pay tuition and do not board in dormitories : 

On entrance $ 75.00 

February 1 45.00 

$120.00 

In addition to the above, for students taking private instruction in 
all departments of Applied Music, Instrumental or Special 
Vocal Music : 

On entrance $ 15.00 

November 15 15.00 

February 1 15.00 

April 1 15.00 

$ 60.00 

Fee for the use of Practice Piano: 

Juniors and Seniors in B.S. in Music course, $18.00 for the year. 
Freshmen and Sophomores in B.S. in Music course, $14.00 for the year. 
Other Music students, $9.00 for the year. 

Fee for Organ Practice : 

One hour per week on the three manual organ, $9.00 for the year. 
One hour per week on the two manual organ, $5.00 for the year. 
One hour per week on the two manual and pedal reed organ, $1.75 for the 
year. 

One hour per week on the pedal piano, $1.75 for the year. 

Fee for Violin and other orchestral instruments, practice room : 

Freshmen and Sophomores in B.S. in Music, $7.00 for the year. 
Juniors and Seniors in B.S. in Music, $9.00 for the year. 
Other Violin students, $4.50 for the year. 

A special fee of $45.00 for the year is charged for the two courses, Music 49 
and 50. 



Expenses 47 

Payments for new students entering February 1, 1933 : 

For students who board in the dormitories and have free tuition: 

On entrance $90.00 

March 15 75.00 

$165.00 

For students who board in the dormitories and pay tuition : 

On entrance $105.00 

March 15 85.00 

$190.00 

LABORATORY FEES 

To defray in part the cost of materials actually consumed by the 
student in her laboratory work, certain fees, ranging in amount 
from one to eight dollars, according to the course taken, will be 
charged. (These fees must be paid on the day of registration, and 
no student may be enrolled in a course until the required fee is paid. 
These fees are listed in the course descriptions appearing elsewhere 
in the catalogue. See Biology, Chemistry, Home Economics, Phys- 
ics, and Education.) 

OTHER NECESSARY EXPENSES 

The only necessary additional expenses at the College will be the 
cost of textbooks, gymnasium outfit, and, for graduates, a diploma 
fee of $5.00. 

NON-RESIDENTS 

A tuition charge of $100.00 is made of a non-resident of the 
State. 

SPECIAL BUSINESS COURSES 

To any student not boarding in the dormitories, the charges for 
a special course in Stenography will be $45.00 for tuition, and the 
regular fees, $75.00. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who register for some form of Applied Music only 
(Piano, Organ, Voice, Violin) pay $75.00. This is payable $45.00 
on entrance, $30.00 at the beginning of the spring semester. 

TEXTBOOKS 

The students are required to purchase their textbooks. For 
their convenience the College will maintain a depository where all 
necessary books may be had at list prices. It would be helpful if 
students would bring a good English dictionary and other useful 
reference books in their possession. English, Latin, French, and 
German lexicons, when needed, must be purchased by the student. 



48 The North Carolina College for Women 

In all business matters, the College prefers to deal directly with 
the students, rather than with their parents or guardians. This 
gives the students business experience and makes them realize the 
cost of their training. 

All students are supposed to matricidate for the full year, and 
must not expect any fees or dues remitted on account of their 
irregularities, or change in plans, except in case of serious illness, 
making it necessary for the resident physician to advise them to 
return home. 

All checks and money orders should be made payable to E. J. 
Forney, Treasurer. 

FREE TUITION 

The College offers no scholarships. The only students who have 
free tuition are those "who signify their intentions to teach upon 
such conditions as may be prescribed by the Board of Directors." 
Part of the dormitory space is reserved for tuition-paying students 
and part for free-tuition students. Each student applying for free 
tuition must sign the following : 

AGREEMENT 

"I seek the opportunities of the North Carolina College for Women 
because it is my desire and intention to teach or do other public service, and I 
agree, in consideration of free tuition granted me in said Institution, if I can 
secure employment and my health permits, to teach in the schools of the 
State, or do other public service for at least two years after I leave the Col- 
lege. If, within three years from the time I leave the College, I fail to do 
as herein stated, from any fault of mine, which shall be decided by the Board 
of Directors or the Executive Committee, I agree to pay the College full 
tuition with interest from the time I attended. I furthermore agree that, until 
this pledge shall have been fulfilled, I will report to the College in May of each 
year after I leave it, the amount of teaching or other public service work I 
have done." 

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS TO THE DORMITORIES 

Under a regulation conforming to the Charter of the Institu- 
tion, free tuition is offered to any young woman who will promise 
to teach or do other public service acceptable to the Board of Direc- 
tors for two years in the State. The capacity of the dormitories is 
limited, however, and the authorities cannot promise to admit to 
the dormitories every applicant who offers the proper entrance 
credits. If the applications from young women desiring to enter 
the College are received before June 1, an attempt will be made 
to give every county and every section of the State its proportionate 
representation in the student body. 

Students who receive appointments can hold them until they 
complete the course, provided their conduct and progress are satis- 
factory to the faculty. 



Loan Funds, Fellowships and Prizes 49 



LOAN FUNDS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND PRIZES 

The Students' Loan Fund was established in 1892-1893. It is 
made up of loans given by a number of individuals. Among these 
are the following: Mr. and Mrs. Josephus Daniels, who gave the 
Adelaide Worth Daniels Fund; Mrs. J. C. Buxton, General and 
Mrs. Julian S. Carr, Charles Broadway Rouss, and Mr. and Mrs. 
V. Everit Macy. This fund now amounts to about $5,291.00. 

The Alumnae Loan and Scholarship Fund. For the purpose 
of making loans to worthy students, chiefly in the higher classes, 
who could not return to College without aid, the Alumnae Asso- 
ciation has undertaken to raise a fund. This fund now amounts to 
about $23,324.00. 

The McIver Loan Fund. As a memorial to the founder and 
first President of the College, the Alumnae Association is raising 
the McIver Loan Fund. This fund is now about $9,186.00. 

Elizabeth Crow Mahler Loan Fund. This fund, now amount- 
ing to $162.00, was established by Miss Sue Mae Kirkland, the 
first Lady Principal of the College. 

Dorris Wright Memorial Fund. This fund of $1,000 was con- 
tributed by friends of C. C. "Wright, Superintendent of Education 
in Wilkes County. This is used for aiding students from Wilkes 
County. It is now $1,167.00. 

The Masonic Theatre Educational Loan Fund of New Bern. 
The Scottish Rite Masons of eastern North Carolina have contrib- 
uted a loan fund of $200.00. 

The Lily Connally Morehead Loan Fund. Mrs. Lily C. Meb- 
ane, of Spray, N. C, has given $4,000.00 as a nucleus of a loan fund 
in memory of her mother. 

Bryant Loan Fund. The Bryant Loan Fund of $7,500.00, be- 
queathed to the College by the late Victor S. Bryant, of Durham, 
N. C, is now available. Notes made from this loan fund bear 6% 
interest from the date of the loan. 

The Class of 1929 Loan Fund. The Class of 1929 established 
a loan fund of $350.00. 

Mollie K. Fetzer Loan Fund. This loan fund was established 
by T. J. Fetzer as a memorial to his sister. It now amounts to 
$359.00. 



50 The North Carolina College for Women 

The late Judge John Gray Bynum bequeathed to the College 
$1,000.00, known as the Hennie Bynum Fund, the income from the 
fund to be used to aid young women from the Presbyterian Church 
of Morganton, N. C. 

The Ida Haughton Cowan Loan Fund. Miss Ida H. Cowan, 
Class of 1902, gave a loan fund of $100.00 in memory of her mother. 
It is now $126.00. 

The Royal Arch and Knights Templar Loan Fund was 
established in the fall of 1921. It is now about $2,139.00. 

The Masonic Loan Fund was established in 1922. It is now 
about $4,865.00. 

The Wilkes County Loan Fund. A loan fund of $300 for 
the aid of students from Wilkes County was given by Miss Clora 
McNeill. It is now $320.00. 

The North Carolina Association op Jewish Women has 
established a loan fund for emergency aid to students in case of 
serious illness. It is now $237.00. 



Miss Jessie McLean has established a loan fund of $50.00 to be 
used as a loan for students needing special medical attention. It 
is now $58.00. 

The Class of 1925 has established a loan fund of $100.00. It 
is now $115.00. 

The students of the Sallie Southall Cotten Building have estab- 
lished a loan fund. 

The Musgrove Memorial Fund. Mrs. Jeannette Musgrove 
Bounds has established a loan fund of $100.00 in memory of her 
father. It is now $107.00'. 

The Mary Foust Loan Fund. This fund has been established 
by President J. I. Foust in memory of his daughter, Mary Foust 
Armstrong. This fund is $454.00. 

The United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships. 
The North Carolina Division of the United Daughters of the Con- 
federacy offers 15 scholarships to descendants of Confederate vet- 
erans. These scholarships are worth $130.00 to $180.00 each. 

The Children of the Confederacy offer two scholarships of 
$130.00 each. 



Loan Funds, Fellowships, and Prizes 51 

The Sarah and Evelyn Bailey Scholarship. Mr. and Mrs. 
T. B. Bailey, whose only children died while students at this Col- 
lege, have established a permanent scholarship to be known as 
the Sarah and Evelyn Bailey Scholarship. 

The Esther Marks Scholarship. Mrs. Marcus Jacobi has 
established a permanent scholarship as a memorial to her daughter, 
who was at one time a student of this College. 

The Mina Weil Endowment Fund. Mrs. Janet Weil Blue- 
thenthal has established an endowment of $6,000 in honor of her 
mother. 

Rebecca Christine Phoenix Memorial Loan Fund. This was 
established in 1932 by Mr. John J. Phoenix and family in memory 
of his daughter. 

The Laura H. Coit Loan Fund is being given by the students 
of the CoUege in 1932-1933. It is now $522.00'. 

The Department op Music at the College has established a 
fund from which Music Contest Scholarships are awarded. The 
fund is now $352.00. 

Henry Weil Fellowship Fund. Mrs. Henry Weil, of Golds- 
boro, N. C, has established at the College in memory of her late 
husband a fund of $16,000.00, known as the Henry Weil Fellow- 
ship Fund. 

(1) The Henry Weil Fellowship shall be awarded each year to 
a member of the graduating class, but if there is no member of the 
class who meets the conditions of award, the committee shall have 
the right to award the fellowship to a member of any class gradu- 
ating within the preceding five years. 

(2) A committee shall be appointed by the Cabinet to act with 
the President in making the award. 

The Camilla Croom Rodman Scholarships. Col. W. B. Rod- 
man, of Norfolk, Virginia, has established two scholarships in mem- 
ory of his wife. The donor reserves the right to select the bene- 
ficiaries of these scholarships, one of which is to be awarded to a 
student from Hyde County and the other to a student from the 
State at large. 

Department of Agriculture Prize. The State Board of Agri- 
culture offers annually to the students of the North Carolina Col- 
lege for Women the following prizes : 

1. To the Senior presenting the best essay on any subject of 
Home Economics, her choice of $25.00 worth of books. 

2. To the student presenting the best essay on any subject 
relating to the improvement of country life or the problems and the 



52 The North Carolina College for Women 

opportunities of the farm women, a similar prize of $25.00 worth 
of books. 

The rules and regulations governing the awarding of these 
prizes are determined by the faculty. 



GOVERNMENT AND STUDENT WELFARE 

GOVERNMENT 

The government of our College is based upon the principles to 
be found in any well organized community which has discovered 
that certain simple, but well-defined laws, are necessary in order 
to promote the well-being of the entire group. The responsibilities 
and privileges of citizenship in our college community are empha- 
sized by both the College authorities and the Student Government 
Association, which is, as nearly as is practicable, the self-governing 
body for the students, and which adopts such regulations as con- 
cern the entire student group in matters of dormitory and campus 
life. Dormitory affairs are administered by House Presidents and 
their assistants, and cases of discipline are handled by a Judicial 
Board. The Legislature, composed of House Presidents, class rep- 
resentatives, and faculty representatives, passes the regulations, 
and is instrumental in developing opinion for their support. All 
officers are chosen democratically. The student organization works 
in close co-operation with the President of the College and the 
Counselors who have charge of the residence department. It is 
understood that to the faculty and executive officers is reserved the 
handling of such things as affect academic matters, matters relating 
to the health of the College community, the control of all property, 
and special cases of discipline which are outside of student juris- 
diction. Believing that a sense of responsibility is one of the great 
educative forces of the College, the administrative officers, faculty, 
and students are attempting to establish here the finest type of 
community life, in order to promote worthy citizenship in the group, 
and so to elevate the educational standards of the institution. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF STUDENT LIFE 

The Department of Student Life is concerned with the extra 
curricular activities and social relationships of the students on the 
campus. It is definitely committed to a policy of closest co-opera- 
tion with the faculty in the promotion of high standards of scholar- 
ship and a well-rounded community life. To the end that each 
student may receive personal counsel and assistance in the handling 
of all her problems, a staff of seven Student Counselors divides this 



Government and Student Welfare 53 

responsibility. The Counselors live in the dormitories and also 
serve as heads of dining rooms. In the dormitory in which a Stu- 
dent Counselor does not live, a faculty member serves in the capac- 
ity of head. All privileges of a routine sort which relate to the 
life of a student, including all absences from the campus, recep- 
tion of visitors, and special requests of various kinds, are referred 
to a Student Counselor for decision, and, when necessary, to the 
oue who is in charge of the division. One Counselor has general 
supervision of the freshmen; another has general supervision of 
the upperclassmen. 

Such freedom as it seems reasonable to grant to the young 
women is accorded them in our social system, which we endeavor 
to regulate to meet the needs of the entire group. An earnest 
attempt is made to study individual needs, and to assist young 
women in their adjustments to the new and often difficult condi- 
tions of the college environment. To this end our social program 
and all extra-curricular activities are planned, that through various 
agencies opportunity may be given for every student to enjoy the 
privileges of a wholesome life on our campus. 

HEALTH ADMINISTRATION 

The general supervision of student health is in charge of the 
Department of Health, which includes in its medical staff two 
experienced women physicians. In an effort to maintain student 
health at the highest efficiency the department provides a complete 
medical examination for each Freshman upon entrance and for 
each Senior before graduation. Records of the results of these 
examinations are kept in the office of the Department of Health 
for future reference in the supervision of the mental and physical 
development of the student. Her physical activities and extra- 
curricular burden are guided by the results of these examinations, 
as is also the number of semester hours allowed her. In an effort 
to impress upon her the importance of such correction and to assist 
her in accomplishing it, a careful follow-up examination is given 
each student in whom any correctible defects are found. 

In addition to these examinations the student health depart- 
ment provides a daily dispensary service at which medical advice 
and treatment are given by the staff, assisted by two trained nurses. 
Any student requiring a specialist's care is promptly referred to 
one. Any dormitory student too ill to attend classes is admitted 
to the Infirmary and treated there with no additional expense 
for nursing and medical attendance beyond the regular medical 
fee which is included in the published expenses. This feature 
obviates the danger of the student's postponing medical care 
because of the expense involved, and brings to the attention of the 
medical staff many minor conditions and other more serious ones in 
their incipiency. 



54 The North Carolina College for Women 

The medical staff assists in the general campus welfare through 
its supervision of the health of faculty and employees, all of 
whom are vaccinated every five years. All who handle food are 
given standard tests for infectious diseases. The department also 
inspects the living quarters of the students, the dining rooms, and 
the kitchen to see that proper health conditions are maintained. 

The living quarters of the students are in the immediate charge 
of a trained supervisor of dormitories. 

A trained dietitian directs dining rooms, cold storage, and 
kitchen. 

Finally, through its division of Hygiene, the Health Department 
attempts to instruct the student in personal health habits, and to 
make her a better citizen by impressing upon her the value of 
community health. 

DINING ROOM AND DORMITORY SUPERVISION 

There are three dining rooms, each seating from five to six 
hundred students. It is the purpose of the Institution to provide 
plenty of wholesome food. The meals and service are planned and 
supervised by a trained dietitian and her assistants. Special care 
is exercised in regard to the milk and butter supply. Careful 
inspection is given to the dining room, kitchen, bakery, and storage 
facilities. Employees are required to have health and vaccination 
certificates. 

There are twelve dormitories, seven of which have been built 
since 1921. These are fireproof, and embody the latest and most 
approved plans in modern construction. Careful attention has been 
given to ventilation, lighting, and heating. All dormitories and 
equipment are inspected daily by the Supervisor of Dormitories. 
The rooms are for two students, and are furnished simply, but 
adequately. There is adequate bathroom space with a sufficient 
supply of hot and cold water on each floor. 

THE ACADEMIC BOARD 

The Academic Board has general supervision of the academic 
work of all students, but especially of Freshmen and Sophomores. 
Its aim is to assist the individual student in all matters pertaining 
to her college work. The Board has discretionary power to decide 
whether a student shall be sent from the College on account of 
failure to do her work or whether she shall be retained in College 
on probation and given a further opportunity to bring her work to 
passing grade. 

The Academic Board also directs the program of Freshman 
Week, which is specifically designed to help the new students be- 
come adjusted to the life of the College. 



Government and Student Welfare 55 

The Board is assisted in its work by members of the faculty who 
serve as Advisers for Freshmen and Sophomores. In order that 
every student may find sympathetic and wise assistance in planning 
her college course and in meeting the problems which may come up 
from time to time, each one is assigned to a Faculty Adviser. It is 
the function of the Adviser to know each student in his group ; to 
work with the group during Freshman "Week ; to assist the student 
in planning her college course, and in developing good methods of 
work; to give to the student her monthly grades on all subjects; 
and to be a ready counselor on any problem which the student may 
have to meet. 

EXTENSION WORK 

In addition to its bulletin service, described elsewhere in this 
catalogue, the College undertakes each year some form of work 
which is, in effect, the carrying of its resources to those beyond its 
walls. During the past session, a series of extension lectures have 
been delivered at representative points, chiefly under the auspices 
of the Alumnae Association, County Teachers' Organizations, Sun- 
day School Associations, and the Federation of Women's Clubs of 
North Carolina. 

An outline of the work of the Extension Division will be found 
elsewhere in this catalogue. Consult the index. 

VOCATIONAL DIRECTOR 

The office of the Vocational Director is prepared to assist stu- 
dents in finding information in regard to occupations in which 
they are interested, in choosing a life work, and in obtaining suit- 
able preparation for it both in connection with their undergraduate 
courses, and in planning for further work in graduate and profes- 
sional schools. The office also maintains an appointment bureau 
and endeavors to find openings for graduates of the College. Its 
services are available at all times to superintendents of schools and 
to employers in the business and professional fields who are looking 
for properly equipped young women for their organizations. 

THE INSTITUTE OF WOMEN'S PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS 

The Institute of Women's Professional Relations is a privately 
endowed research organization sponsored by the American Associa- 
tion of University Women and by the College. It works in close 
co-operation with the office of the Vocational Director, who is also 
Director of the Institute. It acts as a clearing house for informa- 
tion on occupations for women in business and in the professions, 
conducts surveys on present conditions of employment among col- 
lege women, and studies new opportunities for their advancement. 
It looks definitely forward toward the co-ordination of business and 



56 The North Carolina College for Women 

professional requirements with the work of educational institutions, 
the cultivation of greater interest in pre-professional courses, and 
the profitable entrance of college women into various fields such as 
merchandising, finance, production, and specialized professional 
services which have as yet been largely untouched by them. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

Though unsectarian in its management, the College is distinctly 
Christian. Students are urged to attend the church of that denom- 
ination which it is their custom to attend when at home. The 
churches in Greensboro are Baptist, Catholic, Christian, Congrega- 
tional, Episcopal, Friends, Lutheran, Methodist, Methodist Prot- 
estant, Moravian, Presbyterian, Primitive Baptist, Eeformed, and 
Jewish Synagogue. The several pastors of the city churches are 
cordially invited to visit the Institution, in order that they may 
become personally acquainted with the students, and strengthen 
their religious life by helpful talks and conferences. 

Chapel Exercises. — Chapel exercises are held in Aycock audi- 
torium on Tuesdays and Fridays, attendance being required. On 
Tuesdays the exercises are most often of a devotional nature and 
are in charge of members of the College faculty. The Friday con- 
vocations are given over to special music programs, to community 
singing, and to available outside speakers. 

LECTURE AND RECITAL COURSES 

There will be given every year at the College a series of lectures 
by men and women of recognized standing in the literary and scien- 
tific world, and recitals by distinguished music artists. A fee of five 
dollars, collected at the time of registration, gives admission to this 
entire series of lectures, recitals, and other entertainments. 

During the school year 1931-1932 the entertainment course in- 
cluded the following: Senator Robert M. LaFollette, Jr., Abbe 
Ernest Dimnet, Louis K. Anspacker, Elizabeth O'Neill Verner, 
Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Dr. Clyde Fisher, Edward Davison; 
Ted Shawn and his Dancers; Jose Echaniz, pianist; the Don Cos- 
sack Russian Chorus; Margarita Salvi, soprano, and Antonio Cor- 
tis, tenor ; the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra ; and Rene Chemet, 
violinist ; and others. 

SPIRIT OF DEMOCRACY 

A large measure of the success which has attended the North 
Carolina College for Women has been due to the representative 
character and spirit of the young women who have been its stu- 
dents. They have come from all of the one hundred counties of the 
State, and in their political and religious faith, their financial con- 



Government and Student Welfare 57 

dition, and professional and social life, have been thoroughly rep- 
resentative of the people of North Carolina. Among them have, 
been many graduates of other colleges, and more than a thousand 
who had taught school before entering the Institution. In fact, the 
College has had every type of respectable woman in North Caro- 
lina, from the one who enjoyed all the advantages which money and 
social position confer, to the girl whose absence from her humble 
home meant increased toil and self-denial to every member of the 
family. 

A number of the young women remain in the College at their 
own expense, without help from parents, and a majority of them 
expect to become teachers. This fact has exerted a strong influence 
in favor of industry, and the steady performance of duty. More- 
over, the fact that the College has not depended upon the revenue 
derived from any class of its students has tended to aid in its dis- 
cipline, and to imbue all the students with a spirit of democracy. 
The State is always the gainer when its teachers can be trained in 
an atmosphere of equality, which recognizes the worth of honest 
toil and faithful service, regardless of class distinctions. This com- 
ing together of all classes from all sections of the State fosters 
patriotism, self-reliance, and breadth of vision, gives the students 
a clear comprehension of the needs of their State, and inspires 
them with a laudable ambition to be of some service. The spirit of 
the College is, therefore, worthy of the State of North Carolina. 
With a seriousness of purpose nowhere surpassed, and an earnest 
yet kindly striving for the higher standards of life and thought, 
here annually gather, on equal terms, more than two thousand 
North Carolina women. Here is no hatred of wealth, and no con- 
tempt for poverty, but courteous recognition of equal rights, with 
cheerful tribute paid to moral and intellectual worth. 



ORGANIZATIONS 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

There is a unit of the National Young Women 's Christian Asso- 
ciation at the North Carolina College for Women. The aim of the 
National Association is : To unite in one body all like associations 
of the United States ; to establish, develop, and unify such associa- 
tions; to participate in the work of the World Association; to 
advance the physical, social, intellectual, moral, and spiritual inter- 
ests of young women. The local unit became a part of the National 
Association in 1911. 

The Association has its place on the campus for the purpose of 
emphasizing the Christian way of life in the midst of educational 
pursuits and college activities. Standing for the development of 



58 The North Carolina College for Women 

mind, body, and spirit, it endeavors to help girls see life in its 
wholeness, and to adopt a balanced program of living during col- 
lege days. Any student of the college who is in sympathy with the 
purpose, and who makes the personal declaration, "It is my pur- 
pose to live as a true follower of the Lord Jesus Christ," may 
become a member. 

A committee plans for weekly vesper services, which the Asso- 
ciation conducts every Sunday evening in the Music Building. The 
Service Committee and the Social and Hut Committees unite 
in furthering finer ideals of campus-citizenship, hospitality, and 
friendliness. The chairmen of World Fellowship, Industrial Inter- 
ests, and Eace Relations arrange forums and discussions on sub- 
jects of local, national, and international concern to thoughtful 
students of today. Special classes for Bible study are also ar- 
ranged under the auspices of the Association. 

A copy of the Students' Handbook, published by the Young 
Women's Christian Association and the Student Government Asso- 
ciation, and containing much valuable information for students of 
the College, is mailed to every prospective student before her 
arrival at the College in the fall. 

Through the complete range of activities and emphases of the 
Young Women's Christian Association, girls may find widened 
friendships, Christian fellowship, stimulus to honest thought and 
discussion, and practical training in leadership and service. 

ALUMNAE AND FORMER STUDENTS ASSOCIATION 

The Alumnae and Former Students Association of the North 
Carolina College for Women was organized in 1893 and incor- 
porated by act of the General Assembly of North Carolina on 
March 8, 1909. 

The objects of the Association, as set forth in section 3 of the 
act incorporating it, are : 

"To encourage, foster, and promote education in the State of 
North Carolina; to aid and assist the North Carolina College for 
Women, by donations or otherwise; to aid and assist, by loans or 
donations, or both, worthy young women of the State to obtain 
an education at the said College, and for such purpose to receive, 
hold, invest, manage, and disburse any fund or funds which may 
come into its possession." 

One of the constructive pieces of work the Association is engaged 
in doing at the present time is the raising of funds with which to 
erect on the campus a Student- Alumnae Building, to be used as a 
center for social and student activities and as headquarters for the 
Alumnae Association. 

. As the first in a contemplated series, three Alumnae Week-End 
Seminars have been held at the College on the subjects of "Our 
Times," "Child Psychology," and "Modern Literature." 



Organizations 59 

Officers for the past year were: President, Miss Annie M. 
Cherry, Roanoke Rapids; Vice-President, Mrs. Snsie West Men- 
denhall, Burlington; General Secretary, Clara B. Byrd, North 
Carolina College. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Student organizations, in some cases under supervision of mem- 
bers of the faculty but most often entirely controlled by the stu- 
dents themselves, offer exceptional advantages for wholesome 'rec- 
reation and careful training. The student who feels that she may 
have a particular aptitude for some sport, pastime, or academic 
interest will find an organization that will give her encouragement 
and counsel. By joining one or more of the college clubs she can 
not fail to get a specialized and well-rounded development obtain- 
able in no other way. The cost is small and the potentialities 
great. 

THE SOCIETIES 

The Adelphian, Cornelian, Dikean, and Alethian are the four 
social organizations. They occupy a most important place in stu- 
dent life. Managed entirely by the students (faculty members 
being extended only the invitation to honorary membership), they 
give opportunity for friendly intercourse and social improvement. 
While membership is optional, very few if any representative stu- 
dents fail to identify themselves with one or the other of the socie- 
ties. Each society owns a comfortable assembly hall, and keeps 
open house several times during the year. Informal teas, dances, 
and parties are features of many regular programs. The regular 
fortnightly meetings are secret. The Board of Directors prohibits 
any other secret organizations. 

ARCHERY CLUB 

Composed of all students interested in the sport of archery, the 
club owns adequate equipment and meets regularly under the direc- 
tion of a competent instructor. 

BOTANY CLUB 

Faculty and students interested in botany study together the 
broader aspects of 'plant life and the uses of plants. Semi-monthly 
meetings are held, at which meetings papers are read by members 
of the club or by invited guests. Members are elected on the basis 
of their interest and achievements in the study of the subject. 



60 The North Carolina College for Women 

CERCLE FRANCAIS 

It is the purpose of the Cercle Francais to develop an interest in 
the life, manners, and customs of the French people, and to acquaint 
the students with the songs, games, dramas, and home life of the 
French. Meetings of the club, for which special programs are pre- 
pared by the students and the Faculty, are held semi-monthly. 
The exercises are conducted in the French language. Students 
who have had two years of college French are eligible for mem- 
bership. 

CHEMISTRY CLUB 

The purpose of the club is to develop an interest in chemical 
history ; to keep in touch, as far as possible, with new developments 
in the science; and to promote good fellowship among the mem- 
bers. It is composed of the teaching staff, the advanced students in 
chemistry, and those of the general group showing exceptional 
ability in the science. New members are elected on recommenda- 
tion of the faculty of chemistry after mid-year examinations. 

CIRCULO ESPANOL 

The Circulo Espanol serves to acquaint the students of Spanish 
with the life, institutions, and customs of the Spanish people. The 
club meets semi-monthly, and the members present specially pre- 
pared programs of games, songs, and plays in the Spanish language. 
The club is composed of advanced students in Spanish and Faculty 
members. 

DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN 

Students of German are given an opportunity to acquaint them- 
selves with certain phases of German civilization, there being little 
or no time in class for this important privilege. Music, including 
the Yolhsong, furnishes an interesting feature of many meetings 
of the club. Programs often include illustrated lectures, short 
plays, dialogues, and conversational games. The club, which meets 
semi-monthly, is open to all students of German. 

DOLPHIN CLUB 

This is an organization for the promotion of interest in and the 
development of advanced technique in swimming and diving. A 
certain degree of skill is required for entrance, tests being held 
once a year. Kegular weekly meetings are held in the pool at 
7 :15 on Thursday afternoon. 






Organizations 61 

EDUCATION CLUB 

An organization of Faculty and students, the Education Club 
has as its major purpose the study of problems affecting education 
and the profession of teaching. Leading educators often address 
members of the club at the regular monthly meetings. Member- 
ship is limited to members of the faculty, seniors doing practice 
teaching, and to specially qualified juniors. 

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

This organization, affiliated with the national association, has as 
members seniors, juniors, and specially selected sophomores in the 
home economics department. A faculty adviser is chosen every two 
years. The purpose of the club is to arouse interest in the field of 
home economics, to develop an appreciation of home-making, and 
to cultivate the enjoyment of social contacts. The club meets semi- 
monthly, at which time programs are given by members and by 
invited guests. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB 

As the name implies, this club is concerned with the study of 
international problems. It is made up of juniors and seniors in 
the social sciences, with honorary members from the Faculty. 
Special studies in definite fields of investigation are carried on 
throughout the year, the club meeting twice a month. 

THE MADRIGAL CLUB 

See School of Music. 

THE MASQUERADERS 

An honorary dramatic organization, the Masqueraders is com- 
posed of students who have revealed excellence of acting in the 
public productions of the Play-Likers. Membership is by invita- 
tion only. 

MATHEMATICS CLUB 

The Mathematics Club is composed of students interested in the 
science of mathematics. Special programs are prepared for each 
monthly meeting. Freshmen whose work in mathematics is of supe- 
rior quality, together with other students who have chosen the 
science as an elective, are eligible for membership. 



62 The North Carolina College for Women 

ORCHESTRA 

See School of Music. 

ORCHESIS CLUB 

The club is made up of juniors and seniors who have shown an 
aptitude for rhythmics and who intend to pursue the study further. 

PHYSICS CLUB 

The membership of the Physics Club is confined to students who 
are specializing in Physics, students who have done superior work 
in Physics, and interested faculty members. Meetings are held 
semi-monthly. At the meetings papers on diversified subjects in 
Physics are presented by members or invited guests. It is the pur- 
pose of the club to encourage high scholarship and promote interest 
in the study of Physics, to stimulate its members to keep pace with 
the progress of science, and to encourage a spirit of co-operation 
and friendship among its members. 

QUILL CLUB 

The Quill Club is an honorary literary society of students who 
have done work on the various college publications or have shown 
conspicuous literary ability. Its object is to encourage good writ- 
ing among the students and to create an atmosphere favorable to 
the growth of literary interest. Faculty members are also included 
in the membership of the club. 

SCIENCE CLUB 

The membership of the Science Club is confined to members of 
the Faculty in the science, mathematics, and related departments 
of the College. Students in these departments are often invited to 
the meetings. Well-known scientists address the club from time to 
time. The meetings are held semi-monthly and are usually given 
over to one paper of some length and to reports on current scientific 
problems. 

SPEAKERS' CLUB 

Organized for the purpose of fostering interest in the two 
branches of public speaking — oratory and debating — the club ex- 
tends its membership to freshmen as well as upper classmen. 
Members are encouraged to take part in oratorical contests, in 
inter-collegiate and inter-class debates, and in discussion of public 
questions. 



Organizations 63 

YOUNG VOTERS' CLUB 

The Young Voters' Club is made up of sophomore, junior, and 
senior students who feel the need of an organization on the campus 
which will satisfy the demands for political education to promote 
the participation of women in government. This club is affiliated 
with the League of Women Voters, a national organization. 

ZOOLOGY FIELD CLUB 

The Zoology Field Club was organized to encourage study and 
research in zoology, particularly in the animal ecology of this 
region. The membership includes students and faculty members, 
and meetings are held semi-monthly. Occasional trips are made 
to places of interest within the State and to the seashore. 



PUBLICATIONS 



The Bulletin: Issued quarterly by the College. Contains 
matter of general and specific interest to the citizens of the State, 
the faculty, and the college as a whole. 

Alumnae News: Published quarterly. The official organ of 
the Alumnae and Former Students Association. Each issue con- 
tains college notes, communications from graduates and former 
students, and news matter of interest to friends of the College. 

The Carolinian: The college newspaper, issued Thursday of 
each week. 

The Coraddi: Literary magazine, issued monthly. 

Pine Needles: College annual, produced under the auspices 
of the Student Government Association. 

The Extension Division issues during the year many useful 
pamphlets and bulletins. See Extension Division. 



BUDGET SYSTEM 



By popular vote, the student body has approved the budget 
system for financing the several larger student organizations and 
the student publications. Organizations receiving financial aid 
from the budget are: the four societies; the Young Women's 
Christian Association; the Student Government Association; the 
Athletic Association; the Carolinian and the Coraddi. 



PART III — COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



First semester courses are given odd numbers, as 1, 3, 5, etc. 
Second semester courses are given even numbers, as 2, 4, 6, etc. 
A semester hour credit corresponds, unless otherwise stated, to an hour 
class period per week through one semester, or half term. 



ASTRONOMY 



10. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. 

An outline of the basic facts in astronomy and its history, with constella- 
tion study. This course is designed for those interested in the cultural side of 
science and for prospective teachers of General Science and of Geography. 
It has no prerequisite in college mathematics. Three hours, second semester. 
Not open to Freshmen. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Strong. 

For other courses in Astronomy, see Department of Mathematics. 



DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY 

Professors Givler, Hall ; Associate Professors Coldwell, Shaftes- 
bury, Ingraham ; Assistant Professors Williams, Love, Thiel, 
Crittenden; Instructors Lieneman, Farlowe; Assistant 
Rankin. 

COURSES IN BIOLOGY 

1 AND 2. GENERAL BIOLOGY. 

A study of selected types of plants and animals designed to acquaint the 
student with the structure, activities, and life relations of organisms. Bio- 
logical principles are stressed. Three laboratory and two recitation hours, for 
the year. Elective for Freshmen and other students in the Bachelor of Arts 
Course. Bequired of Freshmen in the Bachelor of Science in Physical Edu- 
cation Course. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a semester. 
Miss Coldwell, Mr. Givler, Mr. Shaftesbury, Miss Ingraham, Miss Lieneman, 
Miss Farlowe. 

3. ELEMENTARY BIOLOGY. 

An introductory study of the structures and functions of typical plants 
and animals, and the relationships existing between them. Three laboratory 
and two recitation hours, each semester. Bequired of Freshmen in the Bache- 
lor of Science course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Ingra- 
ham, Miss Farlowe. 

93. THE HISTORY OF BIOLOGY. 

This course will attempt to trace the history of Biology as a science and 
show the origin, development, and relationships of the various biological sub- 
sciences. One hour weeMy, first semester. Elective for Juniors and Seniors 
and recommended for all majors in Biology. Prerequisite, 12 semester hours 
of Biology. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Givler. 



Department of Biology 65 

92. HEEEDITY AND EUGENICS. 

This course deals with the history and meaning of the doctrine of organic 
evolution, the theories and mechanism of heredity, and their relation to the 
problem of human betterment. Lectures, reading of text and reference books 
with written reports. Three recitation hours, second semester. Junior, Senior, 
and Graduate elective. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Givler. 

101. BIOLOGICAL PEOBLEMS. 

Individual studies in Botany, Zoology, or other fields. The laboratory work 
and reading of the student will be guided by a weekly conference with the 
instructor in charge. A written report will be submitted each semester. Lab- 
oratory work and conferences as arranged. Either semester. Elective for 
Graduate Students and for approved Seniors. Credit, three or more semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00 per credit hour. 

COURSES IN BOTANY 

21. GENEEAL BOTANY. 
A survey of the life of seed plants with special emphasis on structure and 

function. Three laboratory and two recitation hours, first semester. Elective 
in the Bachelor of Arts Course. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall, Mr. Thiel. 

22. ADVANCED GENEEAL BOTANY. 
A study of the structure, life history, reproduction, and relationships of 

selected types from the one-celled forms to the vascular plants. Three labora- 
tory and two recitation hours, second semester. Elective in the Bachelor of 
Arts Course. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall, Mr. Thiel. 

24. LOCAL FLOEA. 

Methods and principles of plant classification. The identification of flower- 
ing plants. Field trips. Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour, second 
semester. Junior, Senior, and Graduate elective. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 
2. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall. 

25. HISTOLOGY AND ANATOMY OF PLANTS. 
The technique of preparing plant material for anatomical studies; methods 

of killing, imbedding, sectioning, and staining. The tissues are studied as to 
origin, differentiation, and organization. Six laboratory hours and one recitation 
hour, first semester. Prerequisites, Biology 1, 2, and 21. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. 

26. GENEEAL PLANT MOEPHOLOGY. 
Comparative morphology of Algae, Fungi, and Mosses. Six laboratory 

hours, and one recitation hour, second semester. This course alternates with 28 
and is offered in odd years. Prerequisites, Biology 1, 2, 21, or 22. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Thiel. 

27. PLANT ECOLOGY. 
An elementary study of plants in their natural habitats and in relation to 

the factors of environment such as soil, water, heat, light, and animals. Ma.ior 
emphasis will be placed upon the laws of plant distribution and the factors 
involved in plant associations. Six laboratory hours and one recitation per week, 
first semester. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, 21 or 22. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall. 



66 The North Carolina College for Women 

28. GENEEAL PLANT MOEPHOLOGY. 

Comparative morphology of Ferns, Gymnosperms and Angiosperms. Six 
laboratory hours, and one recitation hour, second semester. This course alter- 
nates with 26 and is offered in even years. Prerequisites, Biology 1, 2, 21, or 
22. Credit, three semester hours. Not offered in 1932-33. Mr. Thiel. 

COURSES IN ZOOLOGY 

41 AND 42. GENEEAL ZOOLOGY. 

A study of the structure, physiology, habits, ecology, distribution, and eco- 
nomic importance of animals, and of the general principles of animal biology, 
with dissection of types of the principal groups. Three laboratory hours and 
two recitation hours, for the year. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, or equiva- 
lent. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a semester. Mr. 
Shaftesbury. 

45. ANIMAL ECOLOGY. 

A survey of the relations of animals to the conditions in which they live. 
Three laboratory hours and two recitation hours, first semester. Open to 
Juniors and Seniors approved by the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

47. ECONOMIC OENITHOLOGY. 

Field work and lectures, first semester. Open to Juniors and Seniors ap- 
proved by instructor. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. 
Shaftesbury. 

48. OENITHOLOGY. 

Field work, together with lectures on morphology and natural history of 
birds. Each student should be provided with opera glass or low power field 
glass. Second semester. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, or equivalent. Credit, 
one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

51. COMPAEATIVE ANATOMY OF VEETEBEATES. 

A study of the comparative anatomy and evolution of the vertebrates, with 
dissection of a series of vertebrate types. Six laboratory hours and one reci- 
tation hour, first semester. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, or 3. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

54. VEETEBEATE EMBEYOLOGY. 

This course is based on the development of the frog, chick, and mammal, 
the work including observation of living material, preparation and study of 
serial sections, and dissection of the larger embryos and foetal membranes. 
Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour, second semester. Prerequisites, 
Biology 1 and 2, or 3. Credit, three semester hours. Junior, Senior, and 
Graduate elective. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Mr. Shaftesbury. 

COURSES IN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

71. MAMMALIAN ANATOMY. 

Human anatomy is studied by means of skeletons, anatomical preparations, 
models, a manikin, and demonstration of human dissections. The cat and other 
mammals are dissected. Three laboratory and two recitation hours, first 
semester. Elective in the Bachelor of Arts Course. Required of Juniors in the 
course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. 
Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, or Biology 3. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams and Miss Eankin. 



Department op Biology 67 

72. HISTOLOGY AND ORGANOLOGY. 

A study of the microscopic structure of the principal tissues and organs 
of the animal body, with practical work in histological technique. Six lab- 
oratory hours and one recitation hour, second semester. Elective in the Bach- 
elor of Arts Course, and Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. Pre- 
requisites, Biology 51, or 71, or 77. Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams and Miss Eankin. 

77. PHYSIOLOGY AND ANATOMY. 

A survey of the structure and functions of each system of the human body 
with special reference to digestion, metabolism, and excretion. Three lab- 
oratory and two recitation hours, each semester. Elective in the Bachelor of 
Arts Course. Bequired of Sophomores in the course leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics. Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, 
or Biology 3. Chemistry 1 and 2, or 3 and 4, prerequisites or parallel. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Miss Williams and Miss Eankin. 

73 AND 74. HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY. 

A detailed study of the physiology of muscles, nervous system, respiration, 
blood, circulation, digestion, metabolism, endocrine system, excretion and 
special senses, with related experiments. Three laboratory and two recitation 
hours, for the year. Elective in the Bachelor of Arts Course. Bequired of 
Seniors in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical 
Education. Prerequisites, Biology 71 or 77, and Chemistry 1 and 2, or 
3 and 4. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. 
Miss Williams and Miss Rankin. 

COURSES IN BACTERIOLOGY 

81. GENERAL BACTERIOLOGY. 

A general survey of the fundamental facts of bacteriology. Laboratory 
technique is emphasized. Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour, each 
semester. Elective in the Bachelor of Arts Course and required of Sophomores 
in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics. 
Prerequisites, Biology 1 and 2, or Biology 3. Chemistry 1 and 2, or 3 and 4, 
prerequisites or parallel. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Love and Miss Rankin. 

82. PATHOGENIC BACTERIOLOGY. 

The relation of bacteria to disease in man. Clinical and diagnostic 
methods; the characteristics, isolation and identification of pathogenic micro- 
organisms. Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour, second semester. 
Prerequisite, Biology 81. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Miss Love and Miss Rankin. 

83. t * LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS. 

This course is designed for the training of sanitary and medical laboratory 
technicians. Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour, first semester. Pre- 
requisite, Biology 81. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 
Miss Love and Miss Rankin. 



t Students preparing to become medical laboratory technicians should elect both 
Chemistry and Biology, one as their major and the other as their minor subject. 

* This College is a member of the Registry of Technicians of the American Society 
of Clinical Pathologists. 



68 The North Carolina College for Women 

84. LABORATORY DIAGNOSIS CONTINUED. 

Individual work for advanced students in bacteriology, clinical microscopy, 
and immunology. Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour, second semes- 
ter. Prerequisites, Biology 82 and 83. Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $4.00. Miss Love and Miss Rankin. 

COURSES IN GEOGRAPHY AND NATURE STUDY 

33. NATURE STUDY. 

A general course intended to aid teachers in interesting pupils of both ele- 
mentary and secondary schools in the common subjects of nature. A number 
of the laboratory periods will be used for field study. Three laboratory and 
two recitation hours, each semester. Required of candidates for all primary 
certificates. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Hall. 

35. GENERAL GEOGRAPHY. 

A study of the fundamental distribution patterns of the world. Climate 
and land forms in particular are studied with a view toward explaining the 
distribution of the peoples of the world and their material works. Three lab- 
oratory and two recitation hours, each semester. Required of all candidates 
for primary, grammar grade, and high school certificates to teach general sci- 
ence. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Crittenden. 

36. ELEMENTS OF REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY. 

A continuation of course 35. A study of the major regions of the world 
in order to understand the relation between man and his physical environment. 
Prerequisite, Biology 35. Three laboratory and two recitation hours, second 
semester. Junior and Senior elective. Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. Mr. Crittenden. 

37. INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY. 

A study of the geographical aspects of the important raw commodities, as 
food, textile fibres, timber, and minerals. The principal manufacturing indus- 
tries; and the relation between resources, manufacturing, trade, trade routes, 
and national policies and development. Three hours, each semester. Junior 
and Senior elective. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Crittenden. 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professor Petty; Associate Professors Barrow, Schaeffer; In- 
structor McDearman; Assistant Parker. 

1 AND 2. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 

Text: Smith's College Chemistry. Three laboratory and two recitation 
hours, for the year. Offered to students with no previous preparation in the 
subject. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 a semester. Miss 
Schaeffer, Miss McDearman. 

3 AND 4. GENERAL CHEMISTRY. 

Text: Brinkley's Principles of General Chemistry. Three laboratory and 
two recitation hours, for the year. Offered to students who present one unit 
in Chemistry for entrance. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 
a semester. 






Department of Cpiemistey 69 

21. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

Six laboratory hours and one recitation, for one semester. Prerequisite, 
Courses 1 and 2, or 3 and 4. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.00 a semester. Miss Petty. 

22. ELEMENTARY QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

Six laboratory hours and one recitation for one semester. Prerequisite, 
Course 21. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00 a semester. 
Miss Petty. 

23. BRIEF COUESE IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

An introduction to Organic Chemistry, including the carbohydrates. Three 
laboratory and two recitation hours, for the first semester. Prerequisite, 
Courses 1 and 2, or 3 and 4. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$4.00. Miss Barrow. 

24. BRIEF COURSE IN FOOD AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 
The chemistry of Lipins, Proteins, digestion, metabolism, and excretion, with 

some work in urine and blood analysis. Three laboratory and two recitation 
hours, for the second semester. Prerequisite, Course 23. Credit, three semester 
hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Miss Barrow. 

31 AND 32. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

This includes the study of the Aliphatic Hydrocarbons, their derivatives, 
their Carbohydrates, the Proteins, and the Aromatic Series. Six laboratory 
hours and one recitation hour, for the year. Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2, or 3 
and 4. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00 a semester. Miss 
Schaeffer. 

33 AND 34. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

The Aromatic Series, with special organic preparations relating to drugs, 
dyes, and Biological processes. Six laboratory hours and one recitation hour, 
for the year. Prerequisite, Courses 31 and 32. Credit, six semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $4.00 a semester. Miss Schaeffer. 

35 AND 36. PHYSIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 

The chemistry of the Carbohydrates, Lipins, Proteins, with studies in diges- 
tion, urine, and blood analysis, and organic tissues. Six laboratory hours and 
one recitation hour. Prerequisite, Courses 31-32, or 23-24. Credit, six semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00 a semester. Miss Barrow. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

41. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. 

Six laboratory hours and one lecture period for the first semester. Pre- 
requisite or parallel, Course 21-22. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Petty. 

42. SELECTED TOPICS IN ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 
Three lectures per weeTc with reading assignments, reports, and discussions. 

Credit, three semester hours. Miss Petty. 



70 The North Carolina College for Women 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Professors Cook, *Kephart, Spier, *Blauch, Fitzgerald; Asso- 
ciate Professors Weatherspoon, Clutts, Kimmel; Assistant 
Professors Denneen, Smith; Instructors Land, Fitzgerald, 
Macfadyen, Kreimeier, Gerberich, Mehaffie, Krug, Gunter, 
Lloyd, Teachey, Cooley, Wilson. 

13. PUBLIC EDUCATION. 

A study of the origin and development of public education in the United 
States with the definite purpose of explaining present conditions in public 
education. The course is designed as a general introductory course in educa- 
tion both for students who will pursue advanced courses in education and for 
students who will not pursue advanced courses in education, but who desire 
to understand the educational problem from the point of view of their duties 
as citizens. A syllabus and assigned readings are employed. Three hours, 
first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Blauch, Miss Spier. 

14. PUBLIC EDUCATION. 

A study of current movements and problems in public education in the 
United States and in North Carolina. It is desirable, but not necessary, that 
students who take this course shall have had Education 13. A syllabus and 
assigned readings are employed. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Blauch. 

16. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRACTICE. 

A study of current practices of the elementary school, based on the ele- 
mentary course of study. Such topics as the following will be treated : Selec- 
tion and organization of subject matter types of lessons; the recitation; the 
socialized recitation; lesson plans and teaching children to study. Observation 
in the Training School. Three hours, second semester. Limited to Sopho- 
mores expecting to teach the ensuing year. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Spier. 

31. EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENTS. 

A study of tests used in elementary grades, including giving tests in the 
training school with tabulations and interpretations of results. One hour, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, one semester hour. Miss Fitzgerald. 

41-A. READING METHODS FOR PRIMARY GRADES. 

This course deals with recent scientific investigation in the field of primary 
reading, and the methods of teaching the subject in the first, second, and third 
grades. Studies of modern reading texts, required readings, discussions and 
reports. This course includes systematic observation in the Training School. 
Two hours, first semester. Open to Seniors and approved Juniors. Pre- 
requisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Spier. 

41-B. PRIMARY CURRICULAR PROBLEMS. 

This course contains primary problems not covered in the other primary 
method courses, including methods in arithmetic, writing, and spelling. This 
course includes systematic observation in the Training School. Two hours, 
first semester. Open to Seniors and approved Juniors. Prerequisite, approval 
of the instructor. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Spier. 



* On leave of absence. 



Department of Education 71 

42. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. 

This course will include an extensive study of children's literature: the 
principles underlying the selection and organization of literary material for 
primary grades. Dramatization and story-telling and other factors including 
the activities of the children which influence oral and written speech. This 
course includes systematic observation in the Training School. Two hours, 
second semester. Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Miss Spier. 

43. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ARITHMETIC AND ENGLISH 
FOR THE INTERMEDIATE AND UPPER GRADES. 

The purposes of this course are to organize the content to be taught in 
arithmetic, reading, spelling, and language in the intermediate and upper 
grades, and to develop with the students an understanding of the aims and 
methods of teaching these subjects. There will be systematic observation in 
the Training School. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, approval of 
the instructor. Open to Seniors and approved Junors. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Fitzgerald. 

44. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY 
FOR THE INTERMEDIATE AND UPPER GRADES. 

In this course the purposes are as follows: to organize the content to be 
taught in geography and history in the intermediate and upper grades; to 
develop with the students an understanding of the aims and methods of teach- 
ing these subjects; and through the working out of individual and group 
projects to give the prospective teacher practice in planning the teaching of 
large units. There will be systematic observation in the Training School. 
Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Fitzgerald. 

45. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH. 

This course is intended for teachers of English in the secondary school. 
The first part of the course deals with methods of instruction in the language- 
composition branch of English; the second part deals with the reading-litera- 
ture branch of the curriculum. Emphasis is placed upon the study and prac- 
tice of the methods of teaching composition, grammar, and literature — the 
choice, the interpretation, the arrangement, and the presentation of materials. 
Recent scientific tests and measurements and the minimum-essentials program 
are also stressed. Systematic observation and demonstration work in the high 
school are included. Prerequisite, Education 69. Credit, three semester hours, 
either semester. Miss Kreimeier. 

46. PROBLEMS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. 

This course is planned for Seniors who have already made a study of the 
Technique of Teaching. The purpose is to examine some of the more funda- 
mental administrative problems which condition the effectiveness of the class 
room teacher. Among the topics discussed are: The scope and function of 
the high school and its relation to the elementary school and the college; the 
junior high school; vocational information; the high-school curriculum; control 
of pupils; and extra-curricula activities. A syllabus and assigned readings 
are used as the basis for the work. Three hours, second semester. Pre- 
requisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Clutts. 



72 The North Carolina College for Women 

47. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL FRENCH. 

This course aims to give practical help in the problems that arise in the 
teaching of French. Among the topics considered will be the following: the 
general aims and methods of teaching a modern language ; the organization of 
a course of study in French; the basis for judging textbooks; reference books 
for the teacher; recent scientific tests in French; the work of the Modern 
Foreign Language Study. Systematic observation of the teaching of French 
in the high school. Three hours, either semester. Prerequisite, content and 
professional courses to meet the approval of the instructor. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mrs. Gerberich. 

49. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL SCIENCE. 

The organization of the course in general science, sources of material, the 
texts, laboratory equipment, and other problems of the science teacher will 
be discussed. The course includes systematic observation of the teaching of 
science in the high school. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, content 
and professional courses to meet the approval of the instructor. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Smith. 

51. ART STRUCTURE. 

A study of the elements and principles of design to develop intelligent 
choice and judgment in the daily use of art, and also to give certain skills 
that are fundamental for the art teacher. Especial attention is given to needs 
of teachers in the elementary schools, but the course is open to other students 
approved by the instructor. Three two-hour lab oratory -lecture periods, either 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mrs. 
Weatherspoon. 

52. INDUSTRIAL ARTS. 

In this course especial attention will be given to the application of art in 
the teaching of related subjects to children in the elementary school. Pre- 
requisite, Art Education 51 or its equivalent. Two three-hour laboratory-lec- 
ture periods, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. Mrs. Weatherspoon. 

53. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL HISTORY AND 
SOCIAL STUDIES. 

A study of the organization of history and social science courses in junior 
and senior high school. Such topics as choice of texts, reference works, 
equipment and supplementary material will be considered. Systematic obser- 
vation of the teaching of these subjects in the high school. Three hours, first 
semester. Education 69, prerequisite, or to be taken jointly for professional 
credit. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Lloyd. 

55. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL LATIN. 

Discussions of aims and general methods of teaching Latin; methods of 
teaching specific points — vocabulary, derivatives, forms, syntax, and transla- 
tion — with emphasis on the work of the first year; devices for arousing inter- 
est; textbooks and supplementary books; standard tests in Latin; recom- 
mendations from the report of the Classical Investigation. Observation of 
the teaching of Latin in the high school. Three hours, either semester. Pre- 
requisite, content and professional courses to meet the approval of the instruc- 
tor. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Denneen. 



Department of Education 73 

57. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL MATHEMATICS. 
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the problems 

involved in the selection, organization, and presentation of the materials in 
high school mathematics. Emphasis will be placed upon the parts played by 
social and psychological factors which enter into these problems. Observa- 
tion of the teaching of mathematics in the high school. Three hours, either 
semester. Prerequisite, content and professional courses to meet the approval 
of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Kimmel. 

58. PROFESSIONAL REVIEW OF ENGLISH. 

Included in the course are thorough reviews of grammar, punctuation, spell- 
ing, pronunciation, and fundamental rhetorical skills. The reviews are intended 
to be of value to all prospective teachers, whether or not English is their 
special field of interest. Although the time will be devoted primarily to sub- 
ject matter, some attention will be given to methods. A considerable amount 
of written work will be demanded in the form of exercises planned to give 
the student a sure knowledge of standard usages in English. Two hours, sec- 
ond semester. For prospective upper-elementary and high school teachers. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Kreimeier. 

59. EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES. 

The course will deal with practical methods for making the school func- 
tion in its wider field of service. Among the topics considered will be assem- 
bly programs, commencement, debating and speaking, the school publications, 
Parent-Teacher Associations and allied activities. Two hours, first semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Clutts. 

61. TEACHING UNDER SUPERVISION. 

Students are assigned to the specific kind of teaching which they expect 
to do — elementary, primary, intermediate, upper grade, or high school. Stu- 
dents before arranging their college program should consult the Training 
School program. 

The work is done in the Training School under the direction of the head 
of the department and under a supervisor for each grade or subject. After 
a period of observation, student teachers are made fully responsible for a 
certain part of the teaching throughout the year, which includes the details of 
school government during their time of teaching. The same period each day 
for five days must be given to this work. Weekly and daily conferences are 
held by supervisors for constructive criticism of teaching and planning new 
lessons. The principles of the special method courses are continuously applied 
to teaching so that theory may constantly function in the improvement of 
teaching skill and that experience in teaching may give meaning and interest 
to theory and principles. Daily worTc in Training School, either semester. 
Prerequisite, Education 64, 68 or 69, or equivalent ; special methods should oe 
taken conjointly. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Kephart and Supervisors. 

63. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND CLASS ROOM MANAGEMENT. 

This course includes: types of school organization, school discipline, pun- 
ishment, problems of school grading and marking, preparation of teachers, 
agencies for teachers' growth in service, records and reports, the daily pro- 
gram, attendance and health of school children, community relations and duties, 
school ethics, and character training. Consideration will be given to standard- 
ized intelligence and achievement tests as aids to classification of pupils. 
Observation of teaching in different grades to study problems of school man- 
agement and to assist students in deciding as to the field of teaching to be 
chosen. Three hours, first semester. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Fitzgerald, Mr. Cook. 



74 The North Carolina College for "Women 

64. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING FOR PROSPECTIVE PRIMARY 
TEACHERS. 
This course includes a study of the school as an ideal environment for the 
development and growth of the primary child, and the field work of the teacher 
in the primary school. Teaching is considered as a fine art in providing proper 
stimuli to child activity and learning. The course includes systematic observa- 
tion and participation in the primary grades of the Training School. Three 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, a course in Psychology or its equivalent. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Spier. 

66. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING. 

Bequired of Juniors in School of Home Economics. Three hours, either 
semester. Prerequisite, three semester hours of Psychology. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Clutts. 

68. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING IN THE GRAMMAR GRADES. 

Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Fitz- 
gerald. 

69. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

Three hours, either semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Clutts. 

70. SOCIAL INTERPRETATIONS OF EDUCATION. 

A study of Education as a socializing force and various social agencies as 
educative factors; and of the school in its relation to the community, the 
state, the church, other institutions, and to the changing social ideals and 
policies. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Cook. 

71. STATE AND COUNTY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. 

This course is planned for the preparation of county superintendents and 
rural supervisors and as a study of the principles underlying an efficient state 
school system, with applications to the present and future needs of North 
Carolina. Discussions will include state and county educational surveys; the 
part of the federal government in public education; sources and distribution 
of school funds; school budgets; selection, preparation, certification, and 
improvement of teachers; school libraries; building programs; school build- 
ings and equipment; consolidation; compulsory attendance; retardation and 
special schools; and methods of estimating teaching efficiency. Field work 
will be given in connection with this course and will consist in the investiga- 
tion and study of actual situations in the state. Three hours, first semester. 
Open to graduate students and approved Seniors with teaching experience. 
Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Cook. 

72. RURAL SCHOOL SUPERVISION. 

The purpose of this course is the preparation of rural supervisors and 
supervising principals. The course deals with the method of supervision, the 
criticism and improvement of instruction, and the standards for judging the 
recitation. Methods of assisting teachers in directing the work of the school, 
playground, and community activities will be considered. The functions of 
the supervisor as distinguished from those of the administrator will be 
stressed in the course. Effective plans used by supervisors will be discussed. 
A study will be made of the chief difficulties of teachers and the means of 
helping them. Opportunities for observation and criticism of recitations will 
be given in the field work of this course. Three hours, either semester. Open 
to graduate students and approved Seniors with teaching experience. Pre- 
requisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Cook 
and others. 



Department of Education 75 

74. RURAL SCHOOL PROBLEMS. 

This course deals with the rural school, its aims and organization. It is 
planned to acquaint the student with the present status of rural education in 
North Carolina. Emphasis will be given to the problems of the small village 
and consolidated schools. Three hours, second semester. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Spier. 

76. THE PRINCIPAL AND HIS SCHOOL. 

This course is for principals of city, village, and consolidated schools. 
Careful attention will be given to the duties which a principal is expected to 
perform. This course includes a brief statement of the type of work which 
should be done in each grade. Community and recreational activities and 
relationships with other schools will be discussed. Reports, methods of pro- 
motion, disciplinary devices, teachers' meetings, and school sanitation will be 
given attention. A practical course to help principals. Three hours, second 
semester. For graduate' students and approved Seniors with teaching expe- 
rience. Prerequisite, approval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. 
Dr. Kephart. 

77. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL SPANISH. 
This course aims to give practical help in the problems that arise in the 

teaching of Spanish, following in the main the chief topics considered in the 
teaching of French as outlined in Education 47. Three hours, either semester. 
Prerequisite, content and professional courses to meet the approval of instruc- 
tor. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Gerberich. 

81. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. 

A study of the physical, biological, psychological, and social bases of edu- 
cation with an interpretation of the principles that underlie and affect the 
curriculum, methods, educational aims, types of school organization, modern 
educational problems and theories, moral and vocational education, and the 
school as a social agency. Three hours, either semester. For Seniors. Grad- 
uate credit to those approved by the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Cook. 

83. MORAL EDUCATION. 

The principles of morality with application to modern problems; moral 
status of different countries and sections with a study of causes; the principles 
and agencies of moral and religious education. Three hours, second semester. 
Open to Seniors and graduates approved by the instructor. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Cook. 

87. HIGHER EDUCATION. 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the principal fea- 
tures of higher education in the United States. A study of the following 
and similar topics: historical development, higher education in foreign coun- 
tries, forms and types of higher education, the relation between secondary 
and higher education, and current problems of higher education. Three hours, 
second semester. Open to Seniors and graduate students. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Blauch. 

89. HISTORY OF EDUCATION. 

This course is designed to give an historical background for the study and 
interpretation of present educational problems. Educational development of 
Western Europe and interpretation in light of social and political conditions. 
Attention will be given to a study of the life and theories of the educational 
leaders of different periods. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, ap- 
proval of the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Clutts. 



76 The North Carolina College for Women 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

Professors Smith, Winfield, Hall, Taylor, Hurley, Dunn ; Asso- 
ciate Professors Gould, Rowley, Wilson; Assistant Professors 
Painter, Tillett, Summerell; Instructors Clegg, Shine. 

REQUIRED COURSES 

I AND 2. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION. 

Reading and analysis of prose with emphasis on composition. Frequent 
themes. Reports on assigned readings, and personal conferences. Three 
hours, for the year. For Freshmen. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hurley 
and Staff. 

5 AND 6. INTRODUCTORY COURSE FOR FRESHMEN. 

Drill in the technique of study. Brief survey of the fields of human knowl- 
edge. One hour, for the year. Bequired of all Freshmen in the Bachelor of 
Arts and Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Courses. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Wilson and Staff. 

II AND 12. LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION. 

A survey course of English literature down to the beginning of the twen- 
tieth century. Outlines, written themes, and oral reports. Personal confer- 
ences. Three hours, for the year. For Sophomores. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Hall and Staff. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

Advisory Committee: Professors Winfield, Hurley; Assistant Professors 
Summerell, Tillett. 

Subject to the approval of the head of the department, any of the following 
courses may be elected by Juniors and Seniors. They should be so elected, 
however, as to come under some general study scheme of literary periods, 
forms, and movements. It is important also that due consideration be given to 
a proper correlation of English with other subjects, notably, Latin, the 
Romance Languages, German, History, and, for those who expect to teach, 
Education. Students who in the judgment of the Advisory Committee have a 
creditable record in the subject may elect English as their major study. Such 
students will be expected to take not less than twenty-four nor more than 
thirty-six semester hours of elective English, one course of which should be in 
prose. At least ten of the required semester hours must be taken from the 
following : 

English 36: Chaucer; English 39, 40: Shakespeare; English 41: Milton; 
English 59, 60: Eighteenth Century Prose; English 43, 44: Romanticism; 
English 45, 46: Nineteenth Century Poets; English 47, 48: The English 
Novel ; English 49 : Spenser ; English 50 : Nineteenth Century Prose — The 
Essay; English 51, 52: American Literature; English 95, 96: Anglo-Saxon, 
Middle English. 

16. PANTOMIMIC ACTION. 

A companion study of Courses 17 and 18. A study of the relation of 
thought and emotion to the various parts of the body. Training in the devel- 
opment of dramatic instinct and character analysis through observation of 
movement. Public appearance in a recognized pantomime if quality of work 
warrants it. Two hours, second semester. For Sophomores. Credit, two 
semester hours. 



Department of English 77 

17 AND 18. THE SPEAKING VOICE. 

A course designed primarily for these interested in further dramatic study, 
but equally suitable for any one desiring to cultivate the speaking voice. The 
fundamentals of speech; mechanism of the voice; stage diction and accent; 
enunciation and pronunciation; tone, color, and pitch; with exercises designed 
to overcome the defects of the individual voice. Three hours, for the year. 
For Sophomores. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Taylor. 

19. PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

The principles and practice of parliamentary law and conduct of meetings, 
followed by training in the delivery of the selected and the original speech. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

20. AKGUMENTATION AND DEBATE. 

A course in the theory and practice of debating, including the detection 
of fallacies, the gathering of material, and the developing of briefs. Actual 
debates, both extempore and prepared, will be held in the class room. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

21. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

This course supplements the required course in composition. It is arranged 
especially for students who intend to make English their major subject. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Prerequisite, English 1 
and 2. Miss Tillett. 

22. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

A continuation of English 21, with special emphasis upon description and 
narration. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Pre- 
requisite, English 1 and 2. Miss Tillett. 

23. THE WEITING OP NEWS 

An elementary course in journalism, with special emphasis on the gathering 
and writing of news. Students will study practical newspaper making in the 
plants of the local papers. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Open to Sophomores and advanced students. Mr. Dunn. 

24. THE EDITING OF NEWS. 

This course is intended to supplement English 23, and will be concerned 
for the most part with newspaper desk work, including editing, headline writ- 
ing, and make-up. Newspaper policies and methods will be considered, with 
a study of present day tendencies. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Open to Sophomores and advanced students. Mr. Dunn. 

25 AND 26. CREATIVE WRITING. 

Advanced composition, including practice in the short story, the essay, 
and other literary forms. Lectures, readings from modern and contemporary 
literature in each of the forms studied. Students desiring to take this course 
should consult the instructor before registering. A limited number of stu- 
dents will be admitted to this course. Two hours, for the year. Credit, four 
semester hours. Open to advanced students. Mr. Dunn. 

27 AND 28. PLAY PRODUCTION. 

A study of the cultural and educative possibilities of amateur dramatics. 
Especially recommended to prospective teachers and social workers who will 



78 The North Carolina College for Women 

be called upon to coach amateur theatricals in their schools and communities. 
Theory and laboratory work in directing, acting, scene-designing, costuming, 
lighting, make-up and stage-setting. Plays will be studied and presented in 
class. Two recitations and three laboratory hours for the year. Junior and 
Senior elective. Open to Sophomores approved by the instructor and the head 
of the English Department. Credit, six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $3.00 
per semester. Mr. Taylor. 

29 AND 30. PLAY WRITING AND ADVANCED PRODUCTION. 

Seminar in the theory and practice of dramatic technique. A student not 
primarily interested in the actual writing of plays may take this course and 
fulfill its requirements in part by working out problems of production, 
although a certain amount of dramatic composition will be required of every- 
one. The number of students admitted to the course must be limited to 
twelve. Three hours, for the year. Prerequisite, English 27 and 28, and the 
approval of instructor. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Taylor. 

31 AND 32. DRAMATIC EXPRESSION AND INTERPRETATIVE 
READING. 

A study of the relation of thought and emotion to voice modulations. 
Training in the development of dramatic instinct. Character analysis. When- 
ever possible students in this course will be given opportunity to appear in 
plays before the college public. Two hours, for the year. Credit, four semes- 
ter hours. Junior and Senior elective. Prerequisite, English 27 and 28, or 
English 17 and 18. Mr. Taylor. 

33. SOCIAL IDEALS IN LITERATURE. . 

The literature which gives expression to the idealism of the West and 
particularly of the English-speaking peoples. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Painter. 

36. CHAUCER. 

A study of the major and certain of the minor poems of Chaucer, with lit- 
erary rather than linguistic emphasis. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Open to Juniors, Seniors, Graduates. Miss Winfield. 

37. SHAKESPEARE. 

Plays typical of the various periods in Shakespeare's dramatic career. 
Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Winfield. 

39. SHAKESPEARE. 

The plays will be taken in approximate chronological order, the first 
semester being devoted, for the most part, to the chronicle plays and comedies. 
Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Winfield. 

40. SHAKESPEARE. 

A continuation of Course 39; the tragedies and romances. Two hours, sec- 
ond semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Winfield. 

41. MILTON. 

A study of the poetry of Milton culminating in Paradise Lost, with out- 
side assignments in his prose and in other literature of the Puritan period. 
Special attention is given to the chief ideas in the poems, and to the devel- 
opment of Milton's personal powers against the social, political, and religious 
background of the seventeenth century. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Rowley. 



Department of English 79 

43. ROMANTICISM IN ENGLISH POETRY, 1780-1805. 

The new interest in external nature, the influence of democracy, and the 
subjective attitude toward life and literature will be studied, with attention 
to such writers as Cowper, Burns, Blake, and more especially, Wordsworth 
and Coleridge. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Smith. 

44. THE LATER ROMANTICISTS, 1805-1825. 

A continuation of Course 43. The second semester will be devoted to study 
of Scott, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Smith. 

45. BRITISH POETS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

A study of the poetry of Tennyson and Arnold, with outside assignments 
on Clough, Morris, Swinburne, and Rossetti. Emphasis is given to the oral 
interpretation of poetry and especially to its vitality as embodying the higher 
ideals of modern thought and conduct. Two hours, first semester. Credit, 
two semester hours. Prerequisite, nine semester hours of English Literature. 
Mr. Smith. 

46. BRITISH POETS OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

The poetry of Robert Browning. An interpretative study of Browning's 
great message on faith, love, art, and the meaning of life as given us in his 
Lyrics, Romances, Men and Women, Dramatis Personae, and a selected, num- 
ber of tragedies. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. 
Prerequisite, nine semester hours of English Literature. Mr. Smith. 

47. THE NOVEL. 

An historical and critical survey of the English and American novel from 
Richardson to the twentieth century. Three hours, first semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Hurley. 

48. THE CONTEMPORARY NOVEL. 

This course is intended to introduce to the student the notable novelists 
of the twentieth century, and to help her to evaluate the newer books in terms 
of modern life as well as of literary art. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hurley. 

49. SPENSER AND THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE. 

The course will include all the important Elizabethans except Shakespeare, 
and will emphasize certain of the critical and social ideals of the English 
Renaissance. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Gould. 

50. NINETEENTH CENTURY PROSE: THE ESSAY. 

A study of the great prose writers of the nineteenth century and of their 
influence upon contemporary life and thought. In particular, Lamb, De Quin- 
cey, Macaulay, Carlyle, Newman, Ruskin, Arnold, and Stevenson will be 
studied. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Gould. 

51. AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

A study of the greater American writers — poets, novelists, essayists, ora- 
tors — with the purpose of discovering the distinctly American elements, espe- 
cially American ideals, reflected in our literature. Three hours, first semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hall. 



80 The North Carolina College for Women 

52. AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

A critical study of Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes, Lowell, Whitman, Lanier, 
Bret Harte, Mark Twain, and others. The emphasis, as in Course 51, will be 
upon the expression of Americanism, and upon the originality of the contri- 
bution made by these masters of our literature. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hall. 

53. AMERICAN FICTION. 

The beginnings of American fiction in the eighteenth century and its 
development through the nineteenth will be studied in relation to the growth of 
fiction writing as an art and the reflection of changing phases of American 
life. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours, college or 
graduate. Mr. Hurley. 

54. AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1880. 

A study of American literature of the last fifty years as an expression 
of the social and intellectual conditions of the American people. Special atten- 
tion is given to the literature of New England, the West, and South follow- 
ing the Reconstruction Period, and to the general tendencies of American lit- 
erature since 1890. Reports on assigned topics are required. Three hours, 
second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hurley. 

55 AND 56. SEMINAR IN AMERICAN LITERATURE. 

First term, the philosophy of Emerson and Whitman; second term, Ameri- 
can humor. One hour, for the year. Prerequisite, English 51 and 52. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mr. Hall. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

57. CONTEMPORARY POETRY. 

A study of contemporary poets whose writings reflect the changing social, 
political, and ethical conventions of our present civilization. Such represen- 
tative English and American poets as Gibson, Brooke, Yeats, Noyes, Masefield, 
Amy Lowell, Robinson, Frost, Masters, and Lindsay will be studied. Two 
hours, first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Prerequisite, Junior stand- 
ing and honors in six semester hours of English Literature. Mr. Smith. 

58. CONTEMPORARY POETRY. 

A continuation of Course 57. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Prerequisite, Junior standing and honors in six semester 
hours of English Literature. Mr. Smith. 

59. PROSE STUDIES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 

This course entails an intensive study of Defoe and the rise of periodical 
literature; satires of Addison, Steele, and Swift; and the conflicting philoso- 
phies of Shaftesbury and Mandeville. In the field of drama the transition 
between Restoration ideals and those of the emerging middle class will be 
considered in the works of Farquhar, Congreve, Steele, and Lillo. Two hours, 
first semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Painter. 

60. PROSE STUDIES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. 

A study of English life and thought as manifested in the various literary 
impulses of the latter half of the eentury. Two hours, second semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Painter. 



Department of English 81 

63 AND 64. INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE. 

Literature — poetry and prose — is considered from the viewpoint of content, 
not method. In a word, this is an inspirational course, its dominant thought 
being: How can the grade teacher arouse in her pupils a genuine love of 
literature? Two hours, for the year. Credit, four semester hours. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

66. LITERATURE FOR THE GRAMMAR GRADES. 

The aim of the course is to introduce to the prospective teacher the abun- 
dant material of literary value in folk-lore and in medieval and modern prose 
and verse, and to help her judge its social and ethical value to the child. 
Required of applicants for grammar- grade certificates. Two hours, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Gould. 

69 AND 70. THE WRITING OF VERSE. 

Application for admittance must be made to the instructor. Two hours, 
for the year. Credit, four semester hours. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

71. THE LITERARY STUDY OF THE BIBLE. 

A reverently critical study of the Bible as a part of the world's great lit- 
erature. The purpose sought in the course may be said to be a fuller com- 
prehension of the truth of the Bible through a more intelligent appreciation 
of its excellences of form and structure. Representative masterpieces will be 
considered, among them essays, orations, stories, and poems. 

Moulton's Modern Reader's Bible is the text. Two hours, first semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Prerequisite, six semester hours of English Lit- 
erature. Mr. Smith. 

72. THE LITERARY STUDY OF THE BIBLE. 

A continuation of Course 71. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two 
semester hours. Prerequisite, English 71 and six additional hours of English 
Literature. Mr. Smith. 

73. POETRY OF KIPLING AND MASEFIELD. 

An examination of the sources of popular appeal in Kipling and Masefield, 
and, more particularly, of the deeper note of earnestness pervading their best 
work. One hour, first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Hurley. 

74. MINOR POETS OF THE VICTORIAN AGE. 

The poems of Mrs. Browning and of the Pre-Raphaelite group will be 
studied. One hour, second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Hurley. 

76. THE PROSE AND POETRY OF MATTHEW ARNOLD. 

A study of the poetry of Arnold and of his literary essays. One hour, 
second semester. Credit, one semester hour. Prerequisite, nine semester hours 
of English Literature. Mr. Smith. 

79. STUDIES IN THE NOVEL. 

The course requires a critical reading of the major works of some one or 
two recognized masters among the older English novelists. In 1931-1932 the 
works of Jane Austen were studied. One hour, first semester. Credit, one 
semester hour. Junior and Senior elective. Open to Sophomores approved 
ly the instructor and the head of the English Department. Mr. Hurley. 



82 The North Carolina College for Women 

80. STUDIES IN THE NOVEL. 

A continuation of English 79 with emphasis on the Contemporary Novel. 
In 1931-1932 Arnold Bennett and John Galsworthy — a realist and a roman- 
ticist — were studied. One hour, second semester. Credit, one semester hour. 
Mr. Hurley. 

81. CHIEF EUROPEAN DRAMATISTS. 

This course will deal with dramatic origins and tendencies in the drama 
of Europe from the Greeks to Ibsen. Eepresentative plays will be studied, 
including plays from Sophocles, Euripides, Plautus, Terence, Calderon, Corneille, 
Eacine, Hugo, Goethe, Schiller, Dumas, and others. The English drama will 
not be included in this course. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Taylor. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

82. STUDIES IN MODERN DRAMA. 

Such representative writers as Ibsen, Hauptmann, Sudermann, Brieux, 
Hervieu, Rostand, Materlinck, Shaw, Barrie, Synge, Echegaray, Drinkwater, 
Moody, and O'Neill will be studied. Three hours, second semester. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Taylor. 

83. FAMILIAR LETTERS. 

A brief historical study of the familiar letter followed by a closer study 
of letters both English and American since the early eighteenth century. 
Limited practice in writing. Two hours, first semester. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Summerell. 

84. THE SHORT STORY. 

A study of the history and development of the Short Story with analysis 
and discussion of the best classic and contemporary stories, both European 
and American. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Rowley. 

85. REPRESENTATIVE AMERICAN PLAYS. 

The course will be a brief history of the American theatre. Due atten- 
tion will be paid to the influence of actors, actresses, and producers on the 
development of the drama together with a consideration of the plays of rep- 
resentative playwrights. Three hours for the first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Taylor. 

87. HISTORY OF THE THEATRE. 

A course tracing the history of the stage from early Greek folk-drama and 
religious festivals through the various phases of its development in Miracle 
and Mystery plays, Passion plays, Commedia del Arte, Shakespearean produc- 
tions to and including the latest development of the stage today. Two hours, 
first semester. Junior and Senior elective. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Taylor. 

88. ARTHURIAN ROMANCE. 

A study of the rise and development of the Arthurian stories from Geoffrey 
of Monmouth to the twentieth century, with a particular emphasis upon the 
treatment of this body of material in the chronicles, romances, and lays of the 
Middle Ages. Supplementary readings will include select pieces outside the 
Arthurian cycle, to the end that the students may secure a fairly comprehen- 
sive knowledge of the chivalric romance as a type. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Painter. 



Department of English 83 

89. PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE. 

The Ancient and Medieval philosophers are studied. Their influence on 
English and American literature is traced both as to periods and specific 
authors. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Wilson. 

90. PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE. 

A continuation of Course 89. Modern philosophers and philosophical ten- 
dencies in relation to English and American literature. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Wilson. 

91. EUGENE O'NEILL AND THE EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE. 

A study of recent experimentalists in drama with chief emphasis on O 'Neili 
as the American exponent. One hour, first semester. Credit, one semester 
hour. Mr. Taylor. 

92. PLAYS OF GEORGE BERNARD SHAW. 

A study of Shaw's contribution to the theatre and of his significance in the 
literary world of the last four decades. One hour, second semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Mr Taylor. 

93. BIOGRAPHY. 

An historical and critical study of European and American biography from 
the time of Plutarch to the twentieth century. Two hours, first semester. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Tillett. 

94. THE NEW BIOGRAPHY. 

A study of recent interpretation of the form and critical estimation of the 
main contributions to it within the past three decades. Two hours, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Tillett. 

95. ANGLO-SAXON. 

An introductory course. Grammar, and readings in prose and poetry. In 
both this course and Course 96 a comparative study between Anglo-Saxon and 
modern English will be made with the view of securing a more comprehensive 
understanding of modern word usage and problems in modern grammar. Three 
hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Wilson. 

96. MIDDLE ENGLISH. 

Grammar and readings in Middle English prose and poetry; a study of 
Middle English literature. See Course 95. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Wilson. 

97. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE : GREEK LITERATURE IN TRANS- 
LATION. 

The most important Greek writings — epics, drama, lyrics, literary criticisms, 
and philosophical works — that have vitally influenced subsequent art, literature, 
and other modes of thought. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Wilson. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

98. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE: LATIN LITERATURE IN TRANS- 
LATION. 

This course is similar to the one above. It, like the course in Greek litera- 
ture, seeks to acquaint the student with some of the wealth of classical cul- 



84 The North Carolina College for "Women 

ture and tradition so necessary to a proper appreciation of many works of 
English and American authors. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Wilson. 
(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

99 AND 100. THE DRAMATIC WORKS OF ROBERT BROWNING. 

Three hours for the year. For graduate students only. Credit, six semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Smith. 

101. THE CONTEMPORARY ESSAY. 

The modern essay considered as a literary and critical medium expressing 
contemporary life and thought. Essays by present-day American writers will 
be studied. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

102. THE CONTEMPORARY ESSAY. 

A continuation of Course 101. Essays by Russian, French, German, Span- 
ish, Italian, and other contemporary foreign writers will be studied. Three 
hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

103. THE SPEAKING VOICE. 

A course designed to develop the speaking voice, and including work in 
open air speaking as well as the use of the voice in large rooms such as gym- 
nasiums. The fundamentals of speech; mechanism of the voice; diction and 
accent; enunciation and pronunciation; tone, color, and pitch; with exercises 
designed to overcome the defects of the individual voice. The course is 
designed especially for Physical Education majors. It is not a methods course. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

105. CURRENT LITERATURE. 

Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Hurley. 



DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN 

Professor Schoch; Assistant Professor Kelley. 

Students who do not offer any German for entrance will take Courses 
1 and 2. Students offering two or three units of German will take Courses 
3 and 4, or 5 and 6, or 7 and 8, according to ability. 

Not all courses 21-62 will be given in any one year; a selection will be 
made meeting as far as possible the needs and desires of the students choos- 
ing the courses. The times for recitation will then be arranged. 

As far as practicable, German is the language of the classroom. 

1 AND 2. ELEMENTARY COURSES. 

Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch, Mr. 
Kelley. 

3 AND 4. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. 

Novellen, short stories, and plays by modern authors. Three hours, for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch. 



Department op German 85 

5 AND 6. INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE. 

Representative works in prose and verse. Three hours, for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Schoch, Mr. Kelley. 

7 AND 8. GERMAN CLASSICS IN ENGLISH FROM MEDIEVAL TIMES 

THROUGH GOETHE'S FAUST. 

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. A general culture course de- 
signed to acquaint the student with such masterpieces as the Nibelungenlied, 
Parzival, selected Minnesongs, Volksong, and Goethe's Faust. Discussions on 
Rationalism, Storm and Stress, Classicism and Romanticism with studies of 
representative works of each movement. One hour, for the year. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Schoch. 

11 AND 12. CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION. 

Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Prerequisite, Ger- 
man 1 and 2. This course may be taken collaterally with German 3 and 4, 
as a Sophomore elective. Miss Schoch. 

21 AND 22. GOETHE'S LIFE AND SELECTED WORKS. 

A reading of Goethe's Faust in the second semester. Three hours, for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schoch. 

23 AND 24. SCIENTIFIC GERMAN. 

Three hours, for the year. Credit, three semester hours. May be taken by 
Science Students instead of German 4. Miss Schoch. 

25. GERMAN FICTION OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. 

26. THE GERMAN DRAMA OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 
Brief lectures on the lives and works of the following authors: Kleist, 

Grillparzer, Hebbel, Ludwig, Anzengruber, Hauptmann, and Sudermann. Three 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Course 5 and 6, or 21 and 22. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

27 AND 28. A SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE. 
Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 

31 AND 32. LESSING AND SCHILLER. 

Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. 

61 AND 62. TEACHERS' COURSE. 

An elementary study of German phonetics; advanced composition and 
grammar; discussion of various methods used in the teaching of modern 
foreign languages; and consideration of grammar and texts. Three hours, for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Eequired of students who desire a 
recommendation to teach German. 



86 The North Carolina College for Women 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 

Professor Cove; Associate Professor Collings; Medical Section: 
Dr. Gove, Dr. Collings, Miss McLean, Miss Staton, Miss 
Henninger; Hygiene Section: Associate Professor Carlsson; 
Assistant Professor Harris ; Instructor Shamburger ; Physical 
Education Section: Professor Coleman; Instructors Tisdale, 
Lauter, Fitzwater, Norton, "White, Davis, Martus. 

The Medical Section has supervision of the health of the individual stu- 
dents and of the College as a whole; conducts health examinations; provides 
office and dispensary attention as well as medical care for sick students. 

The Department of Health, in addition to required courses in Hygiene 
and Physical Education, offers technical training which leads to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. 

I. HYGIENE 

1 AND 2. HYGIENE. 

A practical course designed to give the student a knowledge of personal 
hygiene and to aid in the establishment of definite health habits. Anatomy 
and Physiology are used as a basis for scientific criteria of the problems of 
daily living. Preventive medicine and the relation between individual and 
community are emphasized. New apparatus for visual instruction has been 
installed and used throughout the year. Group or individual problems are 
studied in the spring semester. Two hours, for the year. Bequired of all 
Freshmen except those in the Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Course. 
Credit, four semester hours. Miss Carlsson, Miss Harris, Miss Shamburger. 

3. HYGIENE: SHOET COURSE FOR COMMERCIAL STUDENTS. 

A practical short course in general and individual hygiene for business 
women. Visual instruction and mimeographed outlines are used. Three hours, 
first semester. Bequired. Two semester hours. Miss Harris, Miss Sham- 
burger. 

31. HOME AND COMMUNITY HYGIENE. 

This course covers problems of general welfare and hygiene of the home 
and community. Two hours, first semester. Elective for Juniors and Seniors 
and other students by special permission. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Carlsson. 

32. SCHOOL HYGIENE. 

A course for students who expect to teach. Dealing with basic information 
in health education. Students will participate in health teaching. Two hours, 
second semester. Elective for Juniors and Seniors and other students by 
special permission. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Carlsson. 

67. HEALTH EDUCATION. 

Methods and material suitable for health teaching and class observations 
in elementary and secondary schools. Two hours, first semester. Bequired of 
Seniors in the Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Elective 
for other Seniors. Prerequisite, Hygiene 1 and 2, and Education, one course. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Carlsson. 



Department of Health 87 

n. PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

A. General Courses 

In addition to the 60 year-hour of academic work required for a degree, 
each student must pass three years' work in Physical Education. 

I AND 2. GYMNASTICS AND OUTDOOR SPOETS. 

In the fall, hockey and soccer line practice and passes; in the winter, 
gymnastics, simple group games and folk dances, with marching; in the 
spring, baseball, tennis, track, or swimming. Two hours, for the year. Re- 
quired of all Freshmen. Miss Fitzwater, Miss White. 

3 AND 4. REMEDIAL AND CORRECTIVE EXERCISES. 

Two hours, for the year. Substituted for regular class work on advice of 
the College Physician and Physical Director. Miss Tisdale. 

5 AND 6. MODIFIED GYMNASTICS. 

Light work in gymnastics, games, and minor sports. Designed for stu- 
dents whose strength and endurance render regular work questionable, and 
for those who need special attention given to posture training. Two hours, 
for the year. Miss Fitzwater, Miss Lauter. 

7 AND 8. GYMNASTICS AND GROUP GAMES. 

Two hours, for the year. Required of all Commercial Students. Miss 
Martus. 

II AND 12. GYMNASTICS AND OUTDOOR SPORTS. 

In the fall, a student may choose between field hockey, swimming, soccer, 
basket-ball, tennis; in the winter, all sections are given gymnastics and group 
games; in the spring, folk dancing, baseball, tennis, or track. Two hours, for 
the year. Required of all Sophomores. Miss Fitzwater, Miss White. 

All Juniors are required to take two hours ' work per week in Physical Edu- 
cation. They may choose this work from the following courses: 

23. RHYTHMICS. 

Interpretive dancing, based on natural and spontaneous interpretation of 
musical rhythm. Two hours, each semester. Miss Lauter. 

24. ADVANCED RHYTHMICS. 

Two hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Course 23. Miss Lauter. 

25. CLOGGING. 

Clogs, and reels, presented as types of national dances. Two hours, each 
semester. Miss Lauter. 

26. TAP DANCING. 

Prerequisite, Course 25. Two hours, second semester. Miss White. 

27. FOLK DANCING. 

Two hours, first semester. Prerequisite, one semester of folic dancing or 
rhythmics. Miss Lauter, Miss Fitzwater, Miss White. 

28. ENGLISH FOLK DANCING. 

Two hours, second semester. Prerequisite, one semester of folk dancing or 
rhythmics. Miss White. 



88 



The North Carolina College for Women 



29. SWIMMING. 

Two hours, each semester. For beginners only. Miss White. 

30. SWIMMING. 

Two hours, second semester. Prerequisite, one semester of swimming. Miss 
White. 

31. DEAMATIC GAMES AND DANCES. 

Games and dances of American and European children; methods and mate- 
rial suitable for use in the first six grades. Two hours, each semester. Miss 
Coleman. 

B. Teacher-Training Courses for Major Students 

The technical courses in Physical Education are based on the study of 
Education and of Biology. Courses in Language, History, and other academic 
subjects are required in order to secure the cultural background essential to 
women who hope to hold positions in this field of education. 

For entrance requirements for B.S. Course in Physical Education, see 
page 32. 

No student will be permitted to enter upon or to continue the work of the 
course, when in the judgment of the College Physician, her physical condi- 
tion renders it inadvisable. 

Students entering with advance credits from other colleges are asked to 
arrange a conference with Miss Coleman before registering for the Major 
Course in Physical Education. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The degree of Bachelor of Science will be granted upon successful com- 
pletion of the following courses: 



SEM. 
HRS. 

.. 6 



FRESHMAN 

English 1-2 

English 5-6 2 

Biology 1-2 6 

Foreign Language 6 

History 1-2 6 

Hygiene 1-2 4 

Physical Education 



30 



SOPHOMORE HRS. 

English 11-12 6 

Chemistry 1-2 6 

Foreign Language (second year). . 6 

Psychology 21-22 6 

Physical Education 41 ) g 

Home Economics 28 ) 

Physical Education 



30 



SEM. 
JUNIOR HRS. 

Biology 71 3 

Physical Education 75-76 6 

Education 13-69 6 

Physical Education 51-52 4 

Physical Education 59-60 2 

Physical Education Practice 

*Elective 9 



30 



SEM. 



SENIOR 

Biology 73-74 6 

Sociology 21-26 6 

Physical Education 61-62 4 

Physical Education 63-64 4 

Physical Education 65-66 4 

Physical Education 67 7 . 
Physical Education 68 j ' * ' ' 

Physical Education 69-70 2 

Physical Education Practice 



30 



* Six semester hours must be chosen from one of the studies offered in Division 
I or II. 



Department of Health 89 

In addition to the hours of academic credit, Physical Education major 
students are required to complete the following hours in Physical Education: 

SEMESTER 
FRESHMAN HOURS 

First Semester i RK 13 ' Hocke ^ % hr. 1 

±irst bemester ^ p E> ^ goccer) % hr< j I 

Q -, Q , S P - E - 14 > Baseball, % hr. ) n 

Second Semester { P . B . i 6 J Traokj ^ £. j 1 

SOPHOMORE 

First Semester {|SS;g^W^} * 

Second Semester { |;| *; « = «-> % £• } 1 

JUNIOR 

First Semester P.E. 53, Athletic Coaching 1 

P.E. 55, Dramatic Games 1 

Second Semester P.E. 54, Clogging 1 

P.E. 56, Archery, y 2 hr. | 

P.E. 58, Tennis, % hr. J l 

SENIOR 

First Semester P.E. 71, Swimming Coaching 1 

P.E. 73, Tap Dancing 1 

Second Semester P.E. 72, Rhythmics 1 

P.E. 74, Festival Org 1 

Semester Hours 12 

TECHNICAL COURSES 

41. PLAYGROUND ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. 

The construction and equipment of school and community playgrounds; 
elementary first aid; scout organization and leadership; playground games. 
Three hours, first semester. Required of Sophomores in Bachelor of Science 
in Physical Education Course. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Coleman, 
Dr. Collings. 

51. THE TEACHING OF GYMNASTICS. 

Technique and terminology of gymnastic teaching; lectures and practice. 
Two hours, first semester. Required of Juniors in the Bachelor of Science in 
Physical Education Course. Credit, two semester hours. Miss White. 

52. METHODS AND CURRICULUM BUILDING. 

General methods and their application to Physical Education; surveys of 
state and city programs; standard tests for motor ability and physical 
efficiency. Two hours, second semester. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. 
Norton. 

59 AND 60. LABORATORY (PRACTICE) IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 
Practice in swimming, dancing, and field sports. Required of Juniors in 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss White, Miss Lauter. 



90 The North Carolina College for Women 

61 AND 62. PRACTICE. TEACHING. 

Supervised practice in teaching gymnastics, games, dancing, and swimming. 
Two hours, for the year. Eequired of Seniors in the Bachelor of Science in 
Physical Education Course. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Norton. 

63 AND 64. ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. 

The first semester is given to a study of the history and literature of Physi- 
cal Education. In the second semester the class studies plans and equipment 
for modern gymnasia and athletic fields, and organizes courses in Physical 
Education for high schools and colleges. The methods of supervision in the 
elementary schools are included. The group also takes up the co-ordination 
of departments of health and of recreation with Physical Education. Two 
hours, for the year. Required of Seniors in Bachelor of Science in Physical 
Education Course. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Coleman. 

65 AND 66. REMEDIAL AND CORRECTIVE GYMNASTICS, 

Lectures and clinical practice in Physiotherapy with special reference to 
correction of spine and foot deformities. Two hours, for the year. Required 
of Seniors in the Bachelor of Science in Physical Education, Course. Credit, 
four semester hours. Miss Tisdale. 

67. HEALTH EDUCATION. 

Methods and material suitable for health teaching in elementary and sec- 
ondary schools. Two hours, first semester. Required of Seniors in Bachelor 
of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Carlsson. 

68. EXAMINATION AND MEASUREMENT. 

Lectures and practice in examinations, measurements and efiiciency tests 
of children and adults. Two hours, second semester. Required of Seniors in 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Tisdale. 

69 AND 70. LABORATORY (PRACTICE) IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. 
Advanced practice in the technique of swimming, dancing, gymnastics, 
and field sports. One hour, for the year. Required of Seniors in the Bachelor 
of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Fitzwater, Miss White, Miss Lauter, Miss Davis. 

75 AND 76. KINESIOLOGY. 

This course deals with the human bones, joints, and muscles concerned with 
physical exercises; the mechanical conditions under which these work; the 
manner in which they enter into the co-ordinate movements of life and of 
gymnastics and sports. Especial emphasis is laid on the application of these 
principles to the solution of problems of posture and deformities. Three reci- 
tation hours, for the year. Required of Juniors in the course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. Credit, six semester 
hours. Miss Coleman. 

GYMNASIUM OUTFIT 

Every student in the regular college courses must provide herself with a reg- 
ulation gymnasium outfit as follows: 

Two washable suits ($2.25 each) $4.50 

One official jersey 1.00 

Regulation shoes for gymnastics 2.50 

Two pair ribbed hose (at $.50) 1.00 

$9.00 



Department of Health 91 

Students in the Commercial Courses are not required to purchase jersey. 

This equipment must be secured after coming to college from dealers who 
handle the uniform adopted and required by the Physical Education Depart- 
ment. 

No swimming suit except the regulation tank suit may be worn in the 
swimming pool. This suit must be secured through the Department of Physi- 
cal Education, and is laundered by the College after each swimming period. 
The cost of this suit is about $1.75. Students using the pool must also have 
rubber bathing shoes (cost, $.50). 



DEPARTMENT OF THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

HISTORY 

Professors Jackson, Kendrick, Johns, Arnett; Associate Pro- 
fessor Gullander; Assistant Professors Largent, Draper. 

1 AND 2. MODERN EUROPE. 

A survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of Europe 
since the fifteenth century. Three hours, for the year. For Freshmen. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Arnett, Mr. Johns, Miss Gullander, Miss 
Draper, Miss Largent. 

11. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1783-1865. 

A general survey of the political, social, and economic history of the United 
States. Emphasis will be placed upon the social and economic phases. Three 
hours, first semester. For Sophomores. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Jackson, Mr. Johns, Mr. Kendrick, Miss Largent, Miss Draper. 

12. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865. 

A general survey of the political, social, and economic history of the 
period, with emphasis upon the social and economic phases. Three hours, sec- 
ond semester. For Sophomores. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jackson, 
Mr. Johns, Mr. Kendrick, Miss Largent, Miss Draper. 

Elective Courses for Juniors and Seniors and Specially 
Qualified Sophomores 

The following courses are open to Juniors and Seniors and to those Sopho- 
mores who have made grades of C or above in their Freshman History. 

71. ANCIENT CIVILIZATION. 

The successive civilizations that developed in the valley of the Nile, Meso- 
potamia, the Hellenic Peninsula, and Rome, will be viewed primarily from 
the social angle. Particular emphasis will be laid on the culture and eco- 
nomics of the successive groups. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Gullander. 

72. MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION. 

The period from the third through the thirteenth centuries will be treated 
with a view to discovering the economic and cultural elements of imperial 
Roman, Byzantine, and Medieval life for their own intrinsic value, and also as 
foundations of Modern European civilization. Three hours, second semester. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Gullander. 



92 The North Carolina College for "Women 

46. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION. 

This is a course in the background, causes, and progress of the cultural, 
intellectual, and religious movements in Europe from the fourteenth to the 
seventeenth centuries. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, History 
1 and 2 {except by permission). Credit, three semester hours. Miss Draper. 

41. EUROPE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

A study of the Industrial Revolution and the problems to which it gave 
rise; the growth of nationalism, liberalism, radicalism, and other important 
currents in the political, economic, social, and cultural life of nineteenth cen- 
tury Europe. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, History 1 and 2 
{except by permission). Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Arnett. 

42. EUROPE AND THE EUROPEANIZED WORLD IN THE LATE 
NINETEENTH AND THE TWENTIETH CENTURIES. 
Imperialism, the World War and its aftermath. A study of contemporary 

world problems in their recent historical setting. Three hours, second semester. 
Prerequisite, History 41 {except by special permission). Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Arnett. 

51. THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. 

A brief survey of social, economic, political, and intellectual conditions 
in France and the rest of Europe under the Old Regime, followed by a study 
of the movement of the Revolution. Special emphasis will be placed upon 
the social and economic phases. Two hours, first semester. Prerequisite, His- 
tory 1 and 2 {except by permission). Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Largent. 

52. THE NAPOLEONIC ERA. 

Special emphasis will be placed upon the European and World aspects of 
the period and upon its influence in producing the guiding principles of 
nineteenth and twentieth century history. Two hours, second semester. Pre- 
requisite, History 1 and 2, or History 51 {except by permission). Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Largent. 

83 AND 84. CURRENT HISTORY. 

A study of current affairs, particularly those of an economic and social 
character. Leading periodicals will be used as texts. This course may be 
taken profitably, but not necessarily, in connection with History 29 and 30. 
One hour, for the year. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Kendrick. 

Electives for Juniors and Seniors 

38. LATIN-AMERICAN HISTORY. 

This course will include a survey of the social, economic, and political 
development of the chief Latin-American republics. Special attention will be 
given to the international relations of these countries, particularly as related 
to the United States. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, one year 
of History. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johns. 

31. ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL FOUNDATIONS OF MODERN CIVIL- 

IZATION. 

This course offers a survey of man's civilization from the earliest times 
to the close of the Middle Ages. It will satisfy the state certification require- 
ments in Ancient and Medieval history for those students who are preparing 



(Department of the Social Sciences 93 

to teach history in the high schools of North Carolina. It will serve as an 
introduction (though not a necessary prerequisite) to History 32. Three 
hours, first semester. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Kendrick. 

32. HISTOEY OF THOUGHT AND CULTURE FROM THE CLOSE OF 

THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE PRESENT. 

The aim of this course is to enter sympathetically into the spirit of the 
past and thereby make the thought and culture of the present more intelligible. 
Both History 31 and 32 will be accepted for credit in Sociology. Three hours, 
second semester. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Kendrick. 

35. THE SOUTH. 

A study of the part the South has had in the history of the Nation. Three 
hours, first semester. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Jackson. 

(This course will be given alternate years, with Sociology 27. It will be 
given in 1932-1933, but Sociology 27 will not be given.) 

37. AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY. 

Special emphasis will be placed on the social, economic, and constitutional 
development of the English colonies down to the American Revolution. Three 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Johns. 

29. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 
TO THE CLOSE OF THE CIVIL WAR. 
Two hours, first semester. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, two 

semester hours. Mr. Kendrick. 

30. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

SINCE THE CIVIL WAR. 

The purpose of both History 29 and 30 is to give the student the back- 
ground for understanding the important factors in present-day American 
civilization. Both courses may be taken profitably, but not necessarily, in 
connection with History 83 and 84. Two hours, second semester. Prerequisite, 
one year of History. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Kendrick. 

28. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN HISTORY, 1896, 1930. 

This course will cover such topics as the rise of the New South, the rela- 
tion of politics and business, the passing of the frontier, the currency, the 
economic development of the Nation, the Spanish-American War, the new 
nationalism, and inter-nationalism. Three hours, second semester. Prerequi- 
site, History 11 and 12. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Jackson. 

33 AND 34. REPRESENTATIVE AMERICANS. 

A study of the representative men and women in various phases of Amer- 
ican life — politics, law, religion, science, industry, art, literature, and so on. 
One hour, for the year. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Jackson. 

49 AND 50. THE INDUSTRIAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF ENGLAND 
FROM THE MIDDLE AGES UNTIL THE TWENTIETH CENTURY. 
A study of the principal economic and social problems of England during 
the period indicated. Three semester hours throughout the year. Prerequi- 
site, one year of History. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Gullander. 



94 The North Carolina College for Women 

81. HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA TO 1835. 

A general course covering social, economic, and political conditions and 
developments in the Colony and the State to the Constitution of 1835. Two 
hours, first semester. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Arnett. 

82. HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA SINCE 1835. 

A continuation of History 81, but may be taken independently. Two hours, 
second semester. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Arnett. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Elliott 

All courses in Political Science carry credit as History. 

21. INTRODUCTORY GOVERNMENT. 

This course will be a study of the Federal, State, and local governments 
of the United States. Origin, organization, and development will be empha- 
sized. Special attention will be given to the Government in action — elections, 
law-making, and administration. Three hours, first semester. Junior and 
Senior elective. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Elliott. 

22. INTRODUCTORY GOVERNMENT. 

A continuation of Course 21. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, 
one year of History. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Elliott. 

24. WORLD POLITICS. 

In this course a survey of world politics since 1848 will be made. Impor- 
tant treaties, the partition of Africa, the Far Eastern problem, the position of 
the small and weak states, and the recent efforts to organize the nations of 
the world will be studied. Three hours, second semester. Junior and Senior 
elective. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Elliott. 

25. MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT. 

The study will include surveys of the different forms of city government, 
its functions, and its problems of administration. The possible reforms in 
municipal government will be discussed. Three hours, first semester. Junior 
and Senior elective. Prerequisite, Political Science 11 and 12. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Elliott. 

28. AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES. 

In this course a survey will be made of the development of political parties. 
Party organizations and activities will be studied. Nominations, campaign 
methods, and party reforms will be discussed. Three hours, second semester. 
Junior and Senior elective. Prerequisite, one year of History. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Elliott. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Johnson; Assistant Professor Davis 

11 AND 12. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. 

This course is planned as a Sophomore elective for those who intend to 
major in Sociology or to enter the field of social work. Three hours, for the 
year. For Sophomores. Credit, six semester hours. Prerequisite, approval of 
instructor. Mr. Johnson. 



Department of the Social Sciences 95 

21. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY. 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to the science of 
society. This course will consider the origin, nature, and development of social 
organization as conditioned by physical, biological, psychological, and cul- 
tural factors; the social institutions, such as property, the family, the church, 
and the state; and the inter-relation between human nature and culture. 
Modern social problems will be examined in relation to theories of social 
progress. Three hours, first semester. Junior and Senior elective. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Johnson, Mrs. Davis. 

22. PEINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY. 

Continuation of 21. Three hours, second semester. Junior and Senior elec- 
tive. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson, Mrs. Davis. 

23. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

A study of individual and collective behavior in relation to the various 
social and cultural influences or stimuli. This course deals with group be- 
havior conditioned by original human nature, the cultural environment, and 
differences in class interests. Three hours, first semester. Junior and Senior 
elective. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Johnson. 

24. RURAL SOCIAL PROBLEMS 

The social problems which are peculiar to rural life, such as rural education, 
rural recreation, the rural home, the rural church, will be studied. Three hours, 
second semester. Junior and Senior elective. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Johnson. 

26. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION. 

The approach to the study of the community is made by considering human 
nature and the development of personality. This is followed by a study of 
the processes involved in the economic, ecological, and cultural organization of 
the community. Three hours, second semester. Junior and Senior elective. 
Prerequisite, Sociology 11-12, or 21, or in the case of Seniors, the consent of 
the instructor. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Davis. 

27. INTER-RACIAL RELATIONS. 

After a brief account of the cultural and historical background of the 
Negro in Africa, this course will consider the problems of amalgamation, 
assimilation, population, racial mental equipment, and migration. "With this 
introduction there will follow an analysis of the present political, social, cul- 
tural, and economic status of the Negro in the United States, and a considera- 
tion of such problems as education, health, sanitation, and desirable inter- 
racial relationships. Three hours, first semester. Junior and Senior elective. 
Credit, three semester hours, Mr. Jackson. 

(Not offered in 1932-1933. The course alternates with History 35.) 

28. ANTHROPOLOGY. 

In this course will be discussed the earliest appearance of man, the pre- 
historic history of Europe, the types of mankind, universal human traits, cul- 
ture, the diffusion of culture. The aims of this course are to give a perspec- 
tive of the general history of mankind and an analysis of representative cul- 
tures of primitive and civilized societies for the purpose of recognizing the 
universal human traits reflected in property ownership, marriage, etc. Three 
hours, second semester. Junior and Senior elective. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Johnson. 



96 The North Carolina College for Women 

29. SOCIAL PATHOLOGY. 

This course deals with various social maladjustments and is concerned with 
such processes as dependency, deficiency, degeneration, unrest, demoralization, 
disorganization, and revolution. Three hours, first semester. Junior and Senior 
elective. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Davis. 

33. THE FAMILY. 

A statistical introduction to the problems of the family is followed by a 
consideration of such materials as the natural and institutional family, the 
modern family, the home and the family, the family and the community, 
methods of studying the family, and the mechanism and processes of inter- 
action taking place in the family. Three hours, first semester. Junior and 
Senior elective. Credit, three semester hours. Mrs. Davis. 

36. CRIME AND DELINQUENCY. 

This course will consider theories of criminology and punishment. It will 
analyze case studies of delinquents; compare and criticise programs for the 
social treatment of the criminal. Three hours, second semester. Junior and 
Senior elective. Prerequisite, Sociology 21, or consent of instructor. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mrs. Davis. 

38. SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY. 

A seminar in contemporary sociological theories. Two hours, second semes- 
ter. For majors and minors in Sociology. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Johnson. 

ECONOMICS 

Professor Keister; Mr. Teague. 

11. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 

A study of our present-day economic system. Such topics as the following 
are considered: Specialization; the effects of machinery; large-scale produc- 
tion; functions of middlemen and markets; speculation; money, credit, and 
banking; insurance; business cycles and depressions. Three hours, first semes- 
ter. Open to Sophomores. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

12. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS. 

International trade, foreign exchange, and protective tariffs; demand, sup- 
ply and prices; monopolies and their regulation; the distribution of wealth in 
modern society; consumption; proposals to change the economic order. Three 
hours, second semester. Open to Sophomores. Credit, three semester hours. 
Mr. Keister. 

23. TAXATION. 

The chief governmental expenditures and the main sources of revenue used 
by governments. Property taxes, income and inheritance taxes, license and 
franchise taxes, and various forms of sales taxes will be discussed. A com- 
parison of the tax burden on different classes in society. Especial attention 
will be given to North Carolina's tax problems. Three hours, first semester. 
Junior and Senior elective. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

24. LABOR PROBLEMS. 

A study of the basis for the conflict between workers and employers, and 
some of the more important results of this conflict of interest, such as labor 
organizations, collective bargaining, labor legislation, and the agitation for 
change in the present capitalistic system. Certain special problems presented 



Department of the Social Sciences 97 

by the entrance of women into industry will be studied. Three hours, second 
semester. Junior and Senior elective. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Keister. 

25. GENEEAL ECONOMICS— BEIEFEE COUESE. 

A survey of our economic organization, emphasizing specialization, markets, 
middlemen, money, banking, profits, and wages. Three hours, first semester. 
Required of Juniors in the School of Home Economics. Credit, three semester 
hours. Mr. Keister. 

26. INDUSTRIAL AND COMMEECIAL GEOGEAPHY. 
Same as Biology 37. 

27. MONEY AND BANKING. 

How our different varieties of money and credit instruments are issued 
and secured; the functions performed by money in our society; how the funds 
necessary to carry on modern business are assembled and shifted to those 
who can use them most profitably; the services of trust companies, bond 
houses, stock exchanges, loan associations, mortgage companies, commercial 
banks, and the Federal Eeserve System. Three hours, first semester. Junior 
and Senior elective. Courses 11 and 12 are desirable out not a necessary pre- 
requisite. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

(Not given in 3932-1933.) 

28. THE MANAGEMENT OF PEESONAL FINANCES. 

Budgeting and keeping account of one's personal funds. Depositing and 
borrowing money; drawing and indorsing cheeks properly. Saving and in- 
vesting. The chief investments, with the advantages and. disadvantages of 
each; savings accounts at interest, shares in building and loan associations, 
life insurance, purchase of real estate, bonds and mortgages, and corporation 
stocks. Three hours, second semester. Junior and Senior elective. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

29. MODEEN BUSINESS. 

Some business principles helpful to young women, especially to those who 
may be considering a business career. How a business is organized — the in- 
dividual owner, the partnership, and the corporation. The departments, and 
the functions of each, within a firm, such as production, buying, selling, adver- 
tising, financing, and accounting. Opportunities in the business world open 
to college women. Three hours, first semester. Junior and Senior elective. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

31 AND 32. BUSINESS LAW. 

The aim of this course will be to familiarize the student with the general 
principles of business law, including such subjects as contracts, agency, sales, 
negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, and bankruptcy. Three 
hours throughout the year. Junior and Senior elective. Credit, six semester 
hours. Mr. Teague. 

34. ACCOUNTING. 

How the accounts of a business are kept and how reports are compiled 
from these accounts. To give the student a mastery of the fundamentals of 
accounting, exercises and problems will be required. Business forms, docu- 



98 



The North Carolina College for Women 



ments, and practices will be analyzed to give a familiarity with modern busi- 
ness procedure. Three hours, second semester. Open to Juniors and Seniors 
majoring in Economics. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Keister. 

COMMERCE AND SECRETARIAL TRAINING 

The offerings in this field together with those in Economics are designed 
to provide the principal content courses for students preparing to teach com- 
mercial subjects in high schools and to train young women for positions in the 
business world. 

For the course of study for those preparing to teach commercial subjects in 
the high schools see pages 128-129. 

For those preparing to enter the business world the following program of 
study, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Commerce, is offered: 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



FIRST SEMESTER 

English 1 3 

History 1 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Foreign Language* 3 

Hygiene 2 

English 5 1 



15 



SECOND SEMESTER 

English 2 3 

History 2 3 

Science or Mathematics 3 

Foreign Language* 3 

Hygiene 2 

English 6 1 

15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



FIRST SEMESTER 

English 11 3 

Principles of Economics 11 3 

Psychology 21 3 

American History or ) o 

Foreign Language* J ' 

Electives 3 



15 



SECOND SEMESTER 

English 12 3 

Principles of Economics 12 3 

Political Science 3 

American History or ) „ 

Foreign Language* j 

Electives 3 



15 



JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

Of the 60 hours of work to be completed during the Junior and Senior 
years the following 18 are required: 

Economics 34 (Accounting) 3 Semester hours 

Commerce 23 (Office Management) 3 Semester hours 

Mathematics 41 (Statistics) 3 Semester hours 

Economics 31, 32 (Business Law) 6 Semester hours 

Economics 29 (Business Organization) 3 Semester hours 

18 Semester hours 

The remaining 42 hours of the Junior and Senior years shall be arranged 
in consultation with the adviser in charge of the program of study. 



* A student choosing to take only one year of foreign language in college must con- 
tinue a foreign language offered for entrance. 



Department of the Social Sciences 99 

The courses listed below may be accredited only toward the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Commerce. 

21 AND 22. SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING. 

An intensive course in Gregg Shorthand and touch typewriting. By the 
end of the year the student should be able to take rapid dictation and to 
transcribe the material in correct form on the typewriter. Six hours, through- 
out the year. For Juniors in the Bachelor of Science in Commerce Course. 
Credit, twelve semester hours. 

24. OFFICE MANAGEMENT. 

The principles underlying office management and procedure. Physical ar- 
rangement of the office, modern office equipment and appliances, methods of 
handling, filing, and indexing material, reception of callers, arrangement of 
appointments, and preparation of reports will be considered. Three hours, 
second semester. For Juniors. Credit, three semester hours. 

31 AND 32. SECRETARIAL PRACTICE. 

Those enrolled in the class will be assigned to various members of the 
faculty to take dictation, handle correspondence, type and file material, and to 
obtain general practical experience in secretarial work. Three hours, through- 
out the year. Prerequisite, Commerce 21, 22, and 24. For Seniors. Credit, 
six semester hours. 



DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Professor Shaffer; Associate Professor Peterson; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Playfoot ; Instructors Dennis, Coxe, Butler, Edwards, 
Davis, Blacklock. 

2. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING. 

Cotton and linen materials are studied from the standpoint of the con- 
sumer; selection of materials, planning and adaptation of patterns, and con- 
struction of garments form the basis of this course. One recitation hour and 
six laboratory hours, each semester. Required of Freshmen in Bachelor of 
Science in Home Economics Course. Elective for Sophomores in A.B. Course. 
Credit, three semester hours. Cost of materials, approximately $8.00. Lab- 
oratory fee, 50c. Textbooks: Textile Fibres and Their Uses, Hess. Miss 
Coxe. 

3. HOME ECONOMICS PROBLEMS. 

A general survey of the field of Home Economics and opportunities for 
service will be given; special problems will also be included. One recitation. 
Credit, one semester hour. Required of all Freshmen in Home Economics. 
Miss Shaffer. 

11. POODS AND COOKERY. 

This course includes a study of the composition of foods; principles in- 
volved in their preparation; the source and manufacture, and a study of mar- 
ket prices. One recitation hour and six laboratory hours, each semester. Re- 
quired of Sophomores in Bachelor of Science in Home Economics. Elective 



100 The North Carolina College for Women 

for Sophomores in A.B. Course. Prerequisite, Biology 3. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Laboratory fee, $4.00. Textbook: Food Industries, Vaulte and 
Vanderbilt. Mrs. Edwards. 

12. TEXTILES AND CLOTHING. 

This course includes a study of wool material and its substitutes. Com- 
mercial patterns are used. The construction of children's clothes forms a 
part of this course. One recitation hour and six laboratory hours, each semes- 
ter. Bequired of Sophomores in Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 
Course. Prerequisite, Home Economics 2. Cost of materials, approximately 
$10.00. Laboratory fee, 50c. Textbook: Clothing Construction, Brown. Miss 
Coxe. 

21. HOME COOKERY. 

This course includes the planning, equipment, and furnishing of the kitchen 
and dining room; the preparation and serving of meals, illustrating the cor- 
rect forms of service and menu making. The special problems of marketing, 
pure foods, proper labeling, accurate weights and measures are also studied. 
One recitation hour and six laboratory hours, first semester. Bequired of 
Juniors in Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Course. Prerequisite, Home 
Economics 11. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Mrs. 
Edwards. 

24. DRESSMAKING AND MILLINERY. 

Silk and silk materials are studied. Microscopic and chemical tests for 
the identification of all fibers, cleaning, dyeing of fabrics, and the economic 
situation in the textile industry are considered. 

Designs made in Home Economics 22 form the basis for the garment con- 
struction in dressmaking. 

Millinery practice will be given in the making of felt and fabric hats, the 
selection and design of hats in relation to costume, and remodeling and reno- 
vating hats. 

One recitation hour and six laboratory hours, second semester. Bequired 
of Juniors in Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Course. Credit, three 
semester hours. Prerequisite, Home Economics 12. Home Economics 22 
parallel. Cost of materials, approximately $25.00. Laboratory fee, 50c. 
Textbook: Clothing for Women, Baldt. Miss Coxe. 

26. NUTRITION. 

Heat, measure of food, and methods of determination; heat requirements 
of the body; chemical structure of foods and how these are changed in the 
processes of digestion, assimilation, and metabolism. Protein, minerals, and 
vitamines in relation to nutrition will be especially emphasized. 

Three recitation hours, second semester. Chemistry 23-24 parallel. Be- 
quired of Juniors in Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Course. Credit, 
three semester hours. Textbook: Chemistry of Food and Nutrition, Sherman. 
Mrs. Edwards. 

28. NUTRITION OF CHILDREN. 

The fundamental principles of normal nutrition will be studied. Malnu- 
trition, its causes and means of correction, will be considered. The practical 
work will include the application of these facts to the feeding of children. 

Two recitation and three laboratory hours, second semester. Bequired of 
Sophomores in Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Course. Credit, 
three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Textbook: Feeding the Family, 
Rose. Mrs. Edwards. 



Department of Home Economics 101 

31. DIETETICS. 

Critical review of principles of nutrition related to the family dietary. 
Review of recent literature. Dietaries for families of different incomes. Spe- 
cial problems of feeding the aged and the sick. Part of the practical work 
will be given in the Home Management House. Two recitation and three lab- 
oratory hours, first semester. Required of Seniors in Bachelor of Science in 
Some Economics Course. Prerequisite, Rome Economics 26. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Miss Shaffer. 

32. CHILD CAKE AND HOME NURSING. 

The physical, mental, and moral development of children will form the 
basis of the material discussed in this course. Care of sick in the home will 
be discussed. Nursery school observation will be included in this course. Two 
recitations per weelc and laboratory work, second semester. Required of Seniors 
in Bachelor of Science in Rome Economics Course. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Shaffer. 

33 AND 34. HOME MANAGEMENT. 

This course will consider: (a) management of household operations; (b) 
management of incomes; (c) management of family and group relations; 
(d) management in relation to community obligations to the home. The 
practical work will be given in the Home Management House where each 
Senior is required to live for six weeks. One recitation hour and laboratory 
in Practice Rouse, for the year. Required of Seniors in Bachelor of Science 
in Rome Economics Course. Credit, four semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00 per semester. Miss Shaffer. 

61 AND 62. METHODS IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

The aims and principles of education applied to the field of Home Econom- 
ics, methods of classroom management and special problems in this subject 
are considered. Two hours, for the year. Required of Seniors in the Bachelor 
of Science in Rome Economics Course. Prerequisites, Education 23 and Edu- 
cation 66. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Playf oot, Miss Dennis. 

63 AND 64. PRACTICE TEACHING IN HOME ECONOMICS. 

This course consists of applying the methods of Course 61-62 to the class- 
room work. Conferences, lesson plans, and teaching under supervision. At 
least fifty-four hours of actual work, assisting in nursery school included, will 
be required of each student. Three hours, for the year. Required of Seniors 
in Bachelor of Science in Rome Economics Course. Credit, six semester hours. 
Miss Playfoot, Miss Dennis, Miss Blacklock. 

ART DEPARTMENT 

1. ART STRUCTURE. 

A study of the elements and principles of design and the application of 
these to simple problems. One recitation hour and six laboratory hours, each 
semester. Required of Freshmen in Bachelor of Science in Rome Economics 
Course. Elective for Sophomores in A.B. Course. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, 50c. Text: Goldstein, Art in Everyday Life. Miss Peterson 
and Miss Davis. 

22. COSTUME DESIGN. 

This course covers a survey of historic and national costume and the ap- 
plication of the principles of beauty, hygiene, and economy of dress. 

Laboratory work in designing costumes for various occasions, materials 
and types, some of which will be executed in Home Economics 24. One recita- 



102 The North Carolina College for Women 

tion hour and six laboratory hours, second semester. Required of Juniors vn 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics Course. Elective for Juniors and 
Seniors in A.B. Course. Prerequisite, Home Economics 2. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Peterson and Miss Davis. 

23. HOUSE PLANNING AND FURNISHING. 

A study of the essentials of house planning and furnishing from the stand- 
points of beauty, economy, and sanitation. The history of domestic architec- 
ture and of furnishing as well as modern tendencies in housing will be studied. 

Laboratory work in planning and furnishing houses of different types and 
excursions to houses in process of construction, to the Home Management 
House, and to furniture shops will be required. One recitation hour and six 
laboratory hours, first semester. Required of Juniors in Bachelor of Science 
in Home Economics Course. Elective for Juniors and Seniors in A.B. Course. 
Prerequisite, Home Economics 1. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Peter« 
son and Miss Davis. 

29. HOUSE DESIGN. 

A study of the application of the principles of design to the architecture 
and furnishing of the modern home. Illustrated lectures and reference read- 
ings. Credit, one semester hour. One recitation weekly. Elective for Juniors 
and Seniors other than Home Economics students. Miss Peterson. 

30. COSTUME DESIGN. 

A study of dress from the standpoint of its aesthetic, ethical, hygienic, and 
economic requirements. Illustrated lectures and reference readings. Credit, 
one semester hour. One recitation weekly. Elective for Juniors and Seniors 
other than Home Economics students. Miss Peterson. 

35. AET APPRECIATION. 

The aims of this course are to give a knowledge of the world's master- 
pieces of architecture, sculpture, and painting, and to develop an appreciation 
of art. Lectures will be illustrated with lantern slides and prints. Three 
hours, each semester. Required of Seniors in Bachelor of Science in Home 
Economics Course. Elective for Juniors and Seniors in the A.B. Course. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Peterson. 

Special Directions 

All students taking food courses will be required to wear white at all 
laboratory classes. Any plain white washable suit will do. Ties and belts 
must also be white. Each student must provide herself with a plain white 
smock. A regulation smock has been designed by the Textile and Clothing 
Department. 

Since the purpose of the Textiles and Clothing courses is to teach students 
to select materials more wisely, it is necessary that all materials used in the 
courses be chosen under the supervision of the instructors. 

INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT 

20. INSTITUTIONAL COOKERY AND MARKETING. 

Quantity cookery and the economic study of selection and marketing of 
food products. Lecture. One recitation and six laboratory hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Butler. 

41. INSTITUTIONAL EQUIPMENT. 

Detailed study of dining room and kitchen equipment. Two recitations. 
Credit, two semester hours, first semester. Miss Butler. 



Department op Home Economics 103 

42. INSTITUTIONAL ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. 

Problems of organization and operations in relation to cost, service, and 
equipment. Two recitations. Credit, two semester hours, second semester. 
Miss Butler. 

43 AND 44. PRACTICE WORK. 

Practical experience in the management of all phases of cafeteria organiza- 
tion. Three semester hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Butler. 

Students wishing to elect Institutional Management should take: 
Institutional Management 20 in place of Education 66. 
Institutional Management 41 in place of Home Economics 61. 
Institutional Management 42 in place of Home Economics 62. 
Institutional Management 43 and 44 in place of Home Economics 63-64. 



DEPARTMENT OF LATIN 

Professor Boddie 

NOTE. — Not all of courses 21-31 will be offered in any one year; a 
selection will be made meeting as far as possible the needs and desires of 
students majoring in Latin. Times for recitation will be arranged as needed. 

1. ORATORY AND PROSE COMPOSITION. 

Cicero 's Orations. Talks on private life of Romans and similar subjects. 
Three hours, first semester. Open to Freshmen offering two units of Latin 
for entrance. Credit, three semester hours. 

2. ROMAN MYTHOLOGY. 

Ovid's Metamorphoses. Three hours, second semester. Open to Freshmen 
,who have completed Coarse 1, and as a general elective. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

3 AND 4. HISTORICAL WRITERS. 

Nepos and Livy, with prose composition, fall semester; Tacitus, with Livy, 
continued in spring semester. Three hours, for the year. Open to Freshmen 
offering three entrance units in Latin. Credit, six semester hours. 

5. EPIC POETRY. 

Vergil. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Latin 1 and 2, or 3 and 
4. Credit, three semester hours. 

7. PASTORAL POETRY. 

Vergil. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Latin 1 and 2, or 3 and 
4, and Epic Poetry for entrance. Credit, three semester hours. 

8. LYRIC POETRY. 

Horace's Odes, selections from Ovid, Catullus, Tibullus, and Propertius. 
Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Latin 5 or 7. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. 



104 The North Carolina College for Women 

COURSES FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS 

21. COMEDY. 

Plautus. Three hours, -first semester. Prerequisite, Latin 1 and 2, or 3 
and 4, 5 or 7 and 8, or Latin required of Sophomores. Credit, three semester 
hours. 

22. COMEDY. 

Terence. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Latin 21. Credit, 
three semester hours. 

23. PHILOSOPHICAL ESSAYS. 

Cicero; Seneca. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Freshman and 
Sophomore Latin. Credit, three semester hours. 

24. SATIRE. 

Juvenal, selections from Persius, Horace, and Petronius. Three hours, sec- 
ond semester. Prerequisite, Freshman and Sophomore Latin. Credit, three 
semester hours. 

25. TRAGEDY. 

Seneca. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, three years of College 
Latin. Credit, three semester hours. 

26. ROMAN PHILOSOPHY. 

Lucretius, Cicero, Seneca. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, 
two years of college Latin. Credit, three semester hours. 

27. THE ROMAN LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, two years of college Latin. 
Credit, three semester hours. 

28. EPISTOLARY WRITING. 

Cicero, Pliny, Horace. Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Latin 
1 and 2, or 3 and 4 and 5, or 7. Credit, three semester hours. 

29. ROMAN NOVEL. 

Apulius, Petronius. Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, two years 
of college Latin. Credit, three semester hours. 

31. ADVANCED PROSE COMPOSITION. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, two years of college Latin. Credit, 
three semester hours. 



Department op Library Science 105 



DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Professor Stone; Assistant Professor Reger; Instructor Stubbs; 
Lecturers Williams, Sampson, Trumper, Price. 

This department offers opportunity to properly qualified students who have 
successfully completed the Sophomore year of the A.B. Course to fit them- 
selves as full time school librarians. 

Candidates for the A.B. Degree with a major in Library Science should 
in their Sophomore year take as their electives Psychology 21 and 22. 

The major for Library Science consists of 32 semester hours of prescribed 
subjects to be taken during the Senior year. The remaining 30 semester 
hours to be taken during the Junior year should be divided as follows: 

6 hrs. in Education. 

6 hrs. in English. 

12 hrs. in the Social Science Group or 

6 hrs. in the Social Science Group and 

6 hrs. in Languages. 

Twelve hours in any of the above groups will constitute a minor. 

The following courses, totaling 32 semester hours, are offered: 

1st 2nd 

Sem. Sem. 

Book Selection (Library Science 207) 3 

Cataloging and Classification (203-204) 3 2 

Field Work (217-218) 1 2 

Children 's Literature (212) 3 

Library Administration and History of Libraries (213) .... 4 

Adolescent Literature (214) 2 

Teaching the Use of the Library (216) 2 

Eeference and Bibliography (201-202) 3 3 

Place and Function of the Library in the School (205) .... 2 

*Government Documents (Elective) (222) 2 

16 16 

This Department has been accredited by the Board of Education for Libra- 
rianship of the American Library Association and also meets the requirements 
of the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States 
for training school librarians. 

At present not more than twenty-five students will be admitted to the 
courses in this department, and these courses are not electives for students in 
other departments. Those planning to take this work should write to the 
Director of Library Science asking for an application blank. 

201. REFERENCE AND BIBLIOGEAPHY. 

In this course standard works of reference, general and special, are studied, 
and problems given with a view to teaching the students to evaluate reference 
books and to gain facility in their use. Lectures and problems are given on 
English and American trade bibliography, and the bibliographies of various 
subjects are studied in connection with reference books in those subjects. 
Three hours, first semester. Miss Stubbs. 



This course may or may not be required, depending on individual cases. 



106 The North Carolina College for Women 

202. REFERENCE AND BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

A continuation of Course 201. During this term each student compiles a 
selected and annotated bibliography on a subject in which she is particularly 
interested. Three hours, second semester. Miss Stubbs. 

203. CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION. 

A brief discussion of the various systems of classifying and of the general 
principles of cataloging, followed by instruction and practice in the making of 
a dictionary catalog and of classifying books by the Dewey decimal system. 
The course also includes subject headings, shelf -listing, book numbers, alpha- 
beting, and filing. Three afternoons per week of laboratory work are required 
in connection with this course. Three hours, first semester. Miss Reger. 

204. CATALOGING AND CLASSIFICATION. 

A continuation of Course 203. Two afternoons per week of laboratory 
work are required in connection with this course. Two hours, second semes- 
ter. Miss Reger. 

205. PLACE AND FUNCTION OF THE LIBRARY IN THE SCHOOL. 
The objectives of education are discussed with particular application of 

the part which the library should play in the life of the school. Methods of 
co-operation with the teacher and with other agencies for the most effective 
service are stressed. A study is made of the standards which have been set up 
for the elementary and the secondary school along with attention to such 
details as the location of the school library quarters, their arrangement and 
equipment, appropriations, personnel, and the book collection. Two hours, 
first semester. Mr. Stone. 

207. BOOK SELECTION. 

This course aims to develop in the student ability to choose the best books 
for various types of readers. It includes: reading of representative bocks in 
various classes including fiction; a study of publishers, book reviews and re- 
viewing magazines, translations, series and book selection aids; lectures, read- 
ings, and problems. Practice is given in compiling selective lists on special 
topics and giving oral reports and writing critical book notes. Publisher's 
Weekly is checked frequently for practice in selection for different types of 
libraries. Three hours, first semester. Miss Stubbs. 

212. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. 

An introduction to the field of children's literature with the purpose of 
giving an appreciation of the best that has been written for children. A com- 
parative study is made of different classes and types of books with regard 
to the independent reading of children of different age groups and reading 
interests. Present day publishers of children's books, editions and illustra- 
tions, magazines for children, and the reviewing of children's books are con- 
sidered. Reading of children's books is carried on throughout the course. 
Three hours, second semester. Miss Stubbs. 

213. LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION. 

Lectures, problems, and required readings on the organization and admin- 
istration of the library with special emphasis on the school library and work 
with children. This course includes loan systems, order work, mending, bind- 
ing, statistics, reports, etc. Part of the course is devoted to a brief history of 
libraries. Four hours, first semester. Miss Reger. 



Department of Library Science 107 

214. ADOLESCENT LITEEATUEE. 

A course in Book Selection for Junior and Senior High Schools. Time 
will be devoted to the actual reading and examination of many books, to the 
selection for a particular library situation and to the selection for individual 
pupils. Two hours, second semester. Miss Stubbs. 

216. TEACHING THE USE OF THE LIBEAEY. 

A detailed study of the most approved current theories and practices for 
instruction in the use of the library in both the elementary and secondary 
school, with special emphasis on the planning of courses for the different types 
of schools, on the preparation of detailed plans for individual lesson units 
and the presentation of these lessons. Two hours, second semester. Miss 
Eeger. 

217. FIELD WOEK. 

In this course the student is required to do actual work in the various 
departments of the library in order to get an insight into the details of the 
work. One or two hours, first semester. Miss Stubbs. 

218. FIELD WOEK, 

Continuation of 217. Here the student is given an opportunity to work in 
libraries of various types — public, school, county, and college. Written reports 
of the work are required. A two-day trip of inspection of school libraries in 
neighboring cities is included in this course. One or two hours, second semes- 
ter. Miss Eeger. 

222. GOYEENMENT DOCUMENTS. 

A brief discussion of state and municipal documents, followed by a de- 
tailed study of the branches of the Federal Government, the documents which 
are issued by the various offices and bureaus, and how to obtain and make 
available this material in the library. Special emphasis is placed on suita- 
bility for the school library. Two hours, second semester. Mr. Stone. 



DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professors Barton, Strong; Assistant Professor Watkins 

The courses essential to the major, which is based on 1, 2 and 5 are 17, 
18, 23, 25, 27, 37, 38. The courses essential to the minor, which is based on 1 
and 2, are 17 and 18. In each case, other courses are to be chosen to make 
up the required number of hours. 

1 AND 2. ALGEBEA AND PLANE TEIGONOMETEY. 

1. ALGEBEA. 

Three hours, first semester. 

2. PLANE TEIGONOMETEY. 

Three hours, second semester. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Barton, 
Miss Strong, Miss Watkins. 



108 The North Carolina College for Women 

3. COLLEGE ALGEBRA. 

A more advanced course than Mathematics 1. Open to approved freshmen 
with ability and good training. Not open to students who have had Course 1. 
Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Watkins. 

5. SOLID AND SPHERICAL GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, second semester. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Strong. 

17. ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2, or 3 and 2. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

18. INTRODUCTION TO THE CALCULUS. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Course 17. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Barton. 

25. ADVANCED ALGEBRA. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Course 18. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Strong. 

27. DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALCULUS. 

Three hours, first semester. A continuation of Course 18. Credit, three 
semester hours. Miss Barton. 

28. ADVANCED ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Course 18. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Barton. 

23. THEORY OF EQUATIONS. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Course 25. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Barton. 

32. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Course 27. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Barton. 

37 AND 38. HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS. 

One hour for the year. Prerequisite, Course 17. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Watkins. 

41. THEORY OF STATISTICS. 

An introductory course in statistical methods. Such topics as the collection 
and classification of data, graphical methods, frequency distribution, averages, 
correlation, and index numbers will be treated. This course is designed espe- 
cially for students in other departments who are interested in the fundamental 
principles of statistical methods. Three hours, first semester. Not open to 
Freshmen. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Watkins. 

62. THE TEACHING OF GEOMETRY. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Courses 1 and 2, and approval 
of instructor. 



Department op Mathematics 109 

The following courses will be given whenever called for: 

24. HIGHEE PLANE CUEVES. 

Three hours, second semester. Prerequisite, Courses 27, 28, and 23. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barton. 

31. PEOJECTIVE GEOMETEY. 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, Course 28. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Strong. 

33 AND 34. MODEEN ANALYTIC GEOMETEY. 

Two hours, for tlie year. Prerequisite, Courses 27, 28. Credit, four semes- 
ter hours. Miss Barton. 

ASTRONOMY 
12. DESCEIPTIVE ASTEONOMY. 

The practical work includes constellation study, exercises with the celestial 
globe, and elementary observation with field glass and small telescope. This 
course may be used toward a major or minor. Two recitations and one two- 
hour period for laboratory and observational worlc, first semester. Prerequi- 
site, Mathematics 1 and 2, or 3 and 2. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Strong. 

35 AND 36. ASTEONOMY. 

A fuller treatment of Descriptive Astronomy than that attempted in 
Course 21. Time to be arranged. Three hours, for the year. Prerequisite, 
Mathematics 1 and 2, or 3 and 2, and one course in Physics. Credit, six semes- 
ter hours. Miss Strong. 

(Given upon request.) 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

Professors Brown, Thompson, Fuchs ; Associate Professors Mm or, 
Ferrell; Assistant Professor More; Instructors Southwick, 
Miller, Clement, Friedrich, Schneider, Barnes, Slocum. 

COUESES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

"Applied Music" means the practical study of Piano, Organ, 
Voice, Violin or Orchestral Instruments, in private individual 
lessons. 

PIANO 

The course of study in this department includes : 

I. Technical exercises which are intended to give control of the 
muscles of fingers, hands and arms, making them responsive to the 
commands of the will. 

II. Etudes by the best teachers and composers, which are de- 
signed to give further development to the executive powers, to bring 
about a finer relation between the physical and intellectual faculties, 
and to form a connecting link between purely technical work and 
the higher forms of musical expression. 

III. Compositions by the best composers of the classic, ro- 
mantic, and modern schools. 



110 The North Carolina College for Women 

VOICE CULTURE 

True cultivation of the voice consists in the development of pure 
tone, and its easy, natural use and control in singing. Correct use 
of breath, intonation, attack, legato, accent, phrasing and enuncia- 
tion are the leading features of technical drill. At the same time, a 
higher ideal than the perfection of mere mechanical skill is sought ; 
namely, a musicianly style of singing and all that is implied in the 
broad term "interpretation," together with a thorough apprecia- 
tion of the works of the masters, both old and new. 

ORGAN 

This course provides for a thorough training in all that pertains 
to a mastery of the organ for church and concert use ; voluntaries, 
modulation, transposition, systematic drill in registration, and the 
art of accompaniment. This course of study is especially arranged 
to give a knowledge of the different schools of organ literature, as 
represented by the best composers. 

Organ students receive one private lesson of one whole period a 
week, and one class lesson. 

The prerequisite for entrance to the organ course is the comple- 
tion of the Freshman requirements in Piano of this College, or its 

equivalent. 

VIOLIN 

The instruction offered in this department is based upon the 
most modern and advanced methods of teaching this instrument. 

The work is divided into Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, and 
Senior grades, for the purpose of definitely classifying such stu- 
dents as elect violin for their major study. 

COURSES IN MUSICAL THEORY AND MUSIC EDUCATION 

1 AND 2. HARMONY. 

This course deals with the individuality and unity of melody, harmony, 
and rhythm, as elements of musical expression. It aims to develop the ability 
to recognize, in aural analysis, all the diatonic harmonies in both major and 
minor modes, and to employ them in harmonization of both given and original 
melodies. Emphasis is placed upon the conscious musical fact rather than upon 
the written symbols; hence much original work is required. Three hours, for 
the year. Bequired of Freshmen in School of Music. Elective for students in 
A.B. Course. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Friedrich, Mr. Fuchs. 

3 AND 4. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING. 

This course gives systematic training in the fundamentals of music theory, 
sight singing, and ear training, stressing the elementary problems in pitch and 
rhythm. Individual work is required in both sight singing and ear training. 
Two hours, for the year. Bequired of Freshmen, School of Music. Credit, 
four semester hours. Miss Friedrich. 



Department of Music 111 

11 AND 12. ADVANCED HAEMONY AND MUSICAL FOEM. 

Application of the principles outlined in Courses 1-2, to the study of 
altered chords, chromatic harmonies, remote and enharmonic modulations. 
Analysis of Schumann Op. 68, Mendelssohn's Song Without Words, etc., as a 
basis for the study of the principles of musical form and harmonic analysis. 
Three hours, for the year. Required of Sophomores in School of Music. 
Elective for students in the A.B. Course. Prerequisite, Music 1-2. Credit, 
six semester hours. Mr. Fuchs. 

13 AND 14. HISTOEY OF MUSIC. 

General History of Music, with special attention to the period since the 
year 1600, and with emphasis on the work of the great masters, including a 
critical study of the great orchestral works, the Symphony, Symphonic Poem, 
Overture, and a number of the most important operas of Italian, German, 
and French schools. Two hours, for the year. Required of Sophomores in 
School of Music. Elective for students in A.B. Course. Credit, four semester 
hours. Mr. Brown. 

15 AND 16. SIGHT SINGING AND EAE TEAINING. 

This course gives more extensive training in sight singing and ear training, 
studying more difficult problems, including two- and three-part material. Two 
hours, for the year. Required of Sophomores majoring in Public School 
Music, and of Juniors majoring in voice. Prerequisite, Music 3-4. Credit, 
four semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

17 AND 18. PIANO. 

One hour a week given to advanced work in piano. One hour a week given 
to ensemble work, sight reading, accompanying improvisation. Two hours for 
the year. Required of Sophomores in Public School Music. Prerequisite, 
Piano 1-2. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Clement. 

21 AND 22. COUNTEEPOINT. 

Application of the principles of single and reversible counterpoint, to two 
or more melodies in combination. Study of the various forms of polyphonic 
composition. Three hours, for the year. Required of all Juniors in the School 
of Music majoring in Applied Music. Prerequisite, Music 11-12. Credit, six 
semester hours. Mr. Fuchs. 

23 AND 24. VOICE. 

Breathing and tone production are thoroughly studied and special atten- 
tion is given to diction. Two hours, for the year. Required of Juniors in 
Public School Music. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Schneider. 

25 AND 26. PIANO TEACHING METHODS. 

Classification of fundamental teaching material and best methods of presen- 
tation to the child mind. Notation, sight reading, ear training, rhythm, 
technique, melody writing, and musical games. 

Observation of children's classes. Three hours, for the year. Open to 
Juniors in School of Music majoring in Piano. Prerequisite, Piano 11 and 
12. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Clement. 

27. MUSIC APPEECIATION. 

Both courses in Music Appreciation will be adapted to the needs of the 
general college student who wishes to obtain a better understanding of music 



112 The North Carolina College for Women 

as an element of liberal culture and to develop the power of listening intelli- 
gently. No technical knowledge is required for entrance to either course. 
Two hours, first semester. Junior and Senior elective in A.B. and B.S. 
courses (except B.S. in Music). Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Brown. 

28. MUSIC APPRECIATION. 

The literature of stringed instruments, chamber music, symphonic music, 
the oratorio and the opera will be the subject matter of this course. Two 
hours, second semester. Junior and Senior elective in A.B. and B.S. courses 
(except B.S. in Music). Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Brown. 

29 AND 30. CONDUCTING. 

This course will teach the technique of the baton, the essential qualities of 
successful conducting, the fundamentals of choral and orchestral interpretation, 
and will give practice in conducting, followed by detailed criticism by the 
class and by the instructor. One hour, for the year. Bequired of Juniors in 
Public School Music. Credit, two semester hours. Miss More. 

31 AND 32. COMPOSITION AND ORCHESTRATION. 

Required of Seniors majoring in applied music. Practical work in original 
composition in the shorter forms. Detailed study of the various instruments 
of the modern orchestra; both singly and in combination. Arranging com- 
positions for various groups of instruments and for full orchestra. Six semes- 
ter hours, for the year. Mr. Fuchs. 

35. MUSIC APPRECIATION METHODS. 

A study of the educational values and aims of music appreciation in the 
schools, and the best methods and subject matter for accomplishing those 
aims. Model lessons to the class, observation, and practice teaching in the 
Training School will furnish practical application of the methods studied. 
Two hours, first semester. Required of Seniors in Public School Music. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss More. 

36. SELECTION AND USE OP MATERIALS. 

A study of the various sorts of music materials suited to the development 
of the pupil from childhood to maturity, including several of the most used 
series of school music texts, materials for many sorts of programs, and for 
the various musical organizations of the school and community. Two hours, 
second semester. Bequired of Seniors in Public School] Music. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss More. 

37 AND 38. CHOIR CONDUCTING. 

This course deals with the organization and training of church choirs, the 
technique of conducting and playing the organ at the same time, a study of 
various liturgies, and presents a survey of the best material available for the 
average quartet or chorus choir. Two hours, for the year. Bequired of all 
students majoring in Organ. Junior and Senior elective for students having 
had one year of Organ. Credit, four semester hours. Mr. Thompson. 

39 AND 40. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND SYMPHONIC FORM. 

A study of the larger forms of musical composition. Designed for students 
who give evidence of marked creative ability. Two hours, for the year. Elec- 
tive for students who have taken 31-32, or its equivalent. Credit, four semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Fuchs. 



Department of Music 113 

41 AND 42. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

Fundamentals of music theory and sight reading necessary for grade 
teachers — study of the child voice, rote songs, problems and materials of music 
in grades 1-6. Three hours, for the year. Elective for A.B. students. Credit, 
six semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

41-A. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

The essentials of school music problems and materials in the primary 
grades. Three hours, first semester. Elective for A.B. students. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

41-B. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC. 

The essentials of school music problems and materials in the intermediate 
and upper grades. Three hours, second semester. Elective for A.B. students. 
Credit, three semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

43 AND 44. PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC METHODS. 

A study of the values and aims of music in the elementary school, the sub- 
ject matter used and the best methods of presenting the various problems 
encountered in rote and sight singing. Model lessons by the instructor, lesson 
planning, observation in the Training School, and teaching of the class by 
its members are used as means of gaining teaching skill. Three hours, for 
the year. Bequired of Juniors in Public School Music. Open to Seniors 
majoring in other subjects. Prerequisite, Music 1-2, 3-4. Credit, six semester 
hours. Miss More. 

45 AND 46. HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC METHODS. 

A study of music work in Junior and Senior high schools, including the 
course of study, classes in theory, history, and appreciation; credit for outside 
study; extra-curricular activities and public performances; and the relation 
of the supervisor to the community and to the various members of the school 
organization. Two hours, for the year. Required of Seniors in Public School 
Music. Prerequisite, Music 43-44. Credit, four semester hours. Miss More. 

47 AND 48. SIGHT SINGING AND EAE TEAINING. 

This course lays emphasis on the reading of part work suitable for glee 
club and chorus work in grammar grades and high school. One hour, for the 
year. Required of Juniors majoring in Public School Music and Seniors 
majoring in Voice. Prerequisite, Music 3 and 4, Music 15 and 16. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

49. OECHESTEAL INSTEUMENTS— WOOD- WIND AND BEASS. 

Class study of wind instruments, both wood and brass. Each student is 
given opportunity to gain a practical knowledge of several instruments — a 
knowledge which will be most useful to a student who expects to direct school 
orchestras. Two hours, first semester. Bequired of Juniors in Public School 
Music, and Juniors majoring in Violin. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Miller. 

50. VIOLIN, VIOLA, CELLO, BASS. 

Class instruction. The object of this course is to give the student a work- 
ing knowledge of the string instruments. It aims also to prepare her to 
organize and conduct ensemble classes. Bequired of Juniors in Public School 
Music and of Seniors majoring in orchestral instruments. Two hours, second 
semester. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Friedrich. 



114 The North Carolina College for Women 

61 AND 62. PRACTICE PIANO TEACHING. 

Practice of the principles learned in the methods course by the teaching 
of children under the supervision and direction of the instructor of Piano 
Teaching Methods. 

Observation of children's classes. Three hours, for the year. Open to 
Seniors in the School of Music majoring in Piano. Prerequisites, Music 25-26, 
Piano 21-22. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Clement. 

63 AND 64. SUPERVISED TEACHING. 

The daily teaching in various grades of the Training School is prepared 
for and supplemented by frequent conferences with supervisors for construc- 
tive criticism and planning of new work. Three hours, for the year. Bequired 
of all Seniors in Public School Music. Prerequisite, one year of Education and 
Music 43-44. Credit, six semester hours. Miss More, Miss Barnes. 

65 AND 66. VOICE TEACHING METHODS. 

Classification of teaching material. 

The study of phonetics as applied to the singing voice. Special attention 
to breathing, tone production, tone quality, and diction. Observation and 
practice teaching required. Three hours, for the year. Elective for Seniors 
majoring in Voice. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Schneider. 

67 AND 68. VIOLIN TEACHING METHODS. 

Classification of material and methods of presentation. Ability to teach 
both class groups and individual pupils through observation and practical 
experience. Three hours, for the year. Open to Juniors majoring in violin. 
Credit, six semester hours. Miss Friedrich. 

69 AND 70. PRACTICE VIOLIN TEACHING. 

Application of the problems involved in 67 and 68, through the teaching 
of children, under the direct supervision of the Violin Department. Orchestra 
organization and routine, through active membership in the college orchestra. 
Mr. Fuchs, Miss Friedrich. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Professor Warfield; *Associate Professor Foster; Assistant Pro- 
fessor Tiedeman. 

1 AND 2. GENERAL PHYSICS. 

A general course on the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases, and on 
heat the first semester; and on electricity, sound, and light the second semester. 
This course is designed to serve as a fundamental background for the pursuit 
of the other sciences, and to serve those students who desire some definite 
knowledge of the physical phenomena of the universe. Students who have 
had Mathematics 1 and 2, or its equivalent, are in general advised to take 
Physics 5 and 6, rather than this course. Two recitation hours, and one labora- 
tory period of three hours, for the year. Elective for all classes. Credit, 
six semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. Mr. Warfield, Mr. 
Tiedeman. 



* On leave of absence. 



Department of Physics 115 

3. GENEEAL PHYSICS. 

A short general course on those principles of Physics having applications 
in the home and on such applications of those principles. Two recitation hours 
and one laboratory period of three hours, for one semester — offered each 
semester. Eequired of Freshmen in the course leading to the degree of Bach- 
elor of Science in Home Economics. Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00. Mr. Tiedeman. 

5 AND 6. GENEEAL PHYSICS. 

A general course on the mechanics of solids, liquids, and gases and on 
heat the first semester; and on electricity, sound, and light the second semes- 
ter. This is the basic general Physics course for those students intending to 
enter medical schools or to take more advanced Physics courses. Students who 
have had Mathematics 1 and 2, or its equivalent, are in general advised to 
take this course, rather than Physics 1 and 2. Three recitation hours and 
one laboratory period of three hours, for the year. Elective to all students 
other than Freshmen. Prerequisites, Mathematics 1 and 2. Credit, eight 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00 per semester. Mr. Warfield. 

7 AND 8. GENEEAL PHYSICS. 

A course designed for those students who have had Physics 1 and 2, or 
who are taking Physics 1 and 2 and have not had Mathematics 1 and 2. The 
combined contents of this course with Physics 1 and 2 are equivalent to 
Physics 5 and 6. One recitation hour for the year. Elective. Prerequisites or 
Corequisites, Physics 1 and 2. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Tiedeman. 

11. EXPEEIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

An advanced course on laboratory technique and manipulation as involved in 
special laboratory problems. One laboratory period of three hours, first semes- 
ter. Elective. Approval of instructor is necessary. Prerequisites, Physics 
1 and 2 or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Warfield and Mr. 
Tiedeman. 

12. EXPEEIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

Similar to Physics 11. One laboratory period of three hours, second semes- 
ter. Elective. Approval of instructor is necessary. Prerequisites, Physics 
1 and 2 or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Warfield and 
Mr. Tiedeman. 

21. LIGHT. 

An advanced course on Physical Optics embracing: optical instruments, 
spectra, interference phenomena, polarized light, nature of light, absorption, 
and dispersion. Given in alternate years. Two recitation hours and one lab- 
oratory period of three hours, first semester. Elective. Prerequisites, Physics 

1 and 2 or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. Mr. Warfield. 

22. ELECTEICITY AND MAGNETISM. 

An advanced course on Electrical and Magnetic theories and instruments, 
embracing: electron theory, electrolysis, thermo-electricity, electromagnetics, 
alternating currents, electromagnetic radiations, and electric discharges through 
gases. Given in alternate years. Two recitation hours and one laboratory 
period of three hours, second semester. Elective. Prerequisites, Physics 1 and 

2 or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
Mr. Tiedeman. 



116 The North Carolina College for Women 

23. HEAT. 

An advanced course on tbe theory of Heat, embracing: thermodynamics, 
molecular physics, quantum theory, and radiations. Given in alternate years. 
Two recitation hours and one laboratory period of three hours, first semester. 
Elective. Prerequisites, Physics 1 and 2 or Physics 5 and 6, and Mathematics 
1 and 2, or their equivalents.' Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. Mr. Warfield. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

24. MECHANICS. 

An advanced course on theoretical Mechanics, embracing: wave motions, 
gyroscopic actions, dynamics of fluids (including applications to aeronautics), 
and quantum mechanics. Given in alternate years. Two recitation hours and 
one laboratory period of three hours, second semester. Elective. Prerequisites, 
Physics 1 and 2 or Physics 5 and 6, and Mathematics 1 and 2. Credit, three 
semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Tiedeman. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

25. MODEEN PHYSICS. 

An advanced course tracing the development of Physics from the early 
Greek philosophers to the modern quantum theory. Three recitation periods, 
first semester. Prerequisites, Physics 1 and 2 or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Tiedeman. 

26. ELECTRONICS. 

A course mainly on the properties and practical applications of the elec- 
tron, embracing: photoelectricity, thermoelectricity, cathode rays, X-rays, 
and radioactivity. Two recitation hours and one laboratory period of three 
hours, second semester. Elective. Prerequisites, Physics 1 and 2 or Physics 
6 and 6. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Warfield. 

27. ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES. 

An advanced course on alternating current theory and measurements, em- 
bracing: alternating current power and light circuits, and fundamentals of 
radio circuits and radio waves. Given in alternate years. Two recitation 
hours and one laboratory period of three hours, first semester. Prerequisites, 
Physics 1 and 2 or Physics 5 and 6. Credit, three semester hours. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. Mr. Warfield. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

28. ELEMENTS OF RADIO COMMUNICATION. 

A course of lectures and laboratory work consisting of elementary con- 
siderations of the fundamental laws and their applications to the circuits of 
modern radio systems. Given in alternate years. One recitation hour and 
two laboratory periods of three hours each, second semester. Elective. Pre- 
requisites, Physics 1 and 2 or Physics 5, and 6. Credit, three semester hours. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. Mr. Warfield. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

31. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

A laboratory course which will allow students who have taken Physics 11 
and 12 to continue laboratory work. If the student is deemed capable, the 
work will consist largely of original research. One laboratory period of three 
hours, first semester. Prerequisites, Physics 11 and 12, and two other advanced 



Department of Physics 117 

courses in Physics which have been completed or are being taken concurrently. 
Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory -fee, $1.00. Mr. Warfield and Mr. 
Tiedeman. 

32. EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS. 

Similar to Physics 31. One laboratory period of three hours, second semes- 
ter. Credit, one semester hour. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. Warfield and Mr. 
Tiedeman. 



DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY 

Professors Highsmith, Martin; Assistant Professor Barkley; 
Instructor Chitester. 

11 AND 12. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

Designed to present the basic principles and methods of psychology as an 
experimental natural science. 

Required in a major in psychology. Two recitation hours and one two- 
hour laboratory period a week, for the year. Sophomore, Junior, and Senior 
elective. Credit, six semester hours. Approval of instructor is necessary. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00 a semester. Mr. Barkley. 

21. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

The development of points of view, problems, and methods of psychology; 
the fundamental principles necessary for understanding the behavior of hu- 
man beings: the facts and principles of intelligent behavior, motivation, and 
personality. Three hours, each semester. Sophomore, Junior, and Senior 
elective. Required of all students intending to teach in public schools of North 
Carolina. Credit, three semester hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Mr. High- 
smith, Mr. Martin, Mr. Barkley. 

22. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

The psychological facts and principles in learning, study, individual differ- 
ences, and adjustment. Three hours, each semester. Sophomore, Junior, and 
Senior elective. Required of all students intending to teach in public schools 
of North Carolina. Prerequisite, Psychology 21, or its equivalent. Credit, 
three semester hours. Mr. Highsmith, Mr. Martin, Mr. Barkley. 

23. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the more important 
laws and principles of psychology as they apply to the educative process. 
Three hours, first semester. For Juniors in course leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Home Economics. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Chitester. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

26. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. 

A study of the intellectual and social development of the child from birth 
to adolescence, with special emphasis upon the early developmental period. 
Some of the subjects discussed: Factors influencing development, original 
nature and learning; the development of percepts, language, thought processes; 
play; moral development; personality; the problem child. Three hours, each 
semester. Junior and Senior elective. Required of those who intend to teach 
in the elementary schools of North Carolina. Prerequisite, Psychology 11-12, 
or 21. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Chitester. 



118 The North Carolina College for Women 

28. PSYCHOLOGY OF ELEMENTAEY SCHOOL SUBJECTS. 

This course is a critical analysis of the mental processes by means of which 
the learner assimilates the content of the elementary curriculum. Three hours, 
second semester. Junior and Senior elective. Prerequisite, one year of Psy- 
chology. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Martin. 

30. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

A study of the development of social behavior in the individual and its 
significance for social and vocational adjustments. Three hours, second semes- 
ter. Junior and Senior elective. Prerequisite, one course in Psychology. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Highsmith. 

32. ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY. 

A survey of the methods, problems, and results of modern psychology in 
the various fields in which it is found applicable. The discussion will be cen- 
tered around typical experiments where this is possible. Three hours, second 
semester. Junior and Senior elective. Prerquisite, one course in Psychology. 
Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Highsmith. 

33. SPECIAL PEOBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. 

This course affords an opportunity for students in Psychology and educa- 
tional psychology to do intensive work on special experimental or statistical 
problems in these fields. Three hours, each semester. Consult instructor 
before registering for this course. Credit, three semester hours. Members of 
Staff. 

34. SPECIAL PEOBLEMS OF PSYCHOLOGY. 

This course is a continuation of Psychology 33. Three hours, each semes- 
ter. Prerequisite, Psychology 33. Credit, three semester hours. Members of 
Staff. 

37. MENTAL MEASUEEMENTS. 

A study of the current methods of measuring mental abilities. Practice 
in the administration and scoring of group and individual tests and in the sta- 
tistical analysis and interpretation of test results. Three hours, first semester. 
Junior and Senior elective. Prerequisite, Psychology 11-12, or 21. Credit, 
three semester hours. Miss Chitester. 

40. PEOBLEMS IN ELEMENTAEY STATISTICAL METHODS. 

The course is designed to equip students with methods and techniques for 
investigating such problems as involve accurate quantitative treatment. Special 
consideration is given to methods of investigating measurement problems in 
Education and Psychology. Three hours, second semester. Junior and Senior 
elective. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Highsmith. 

41. ABNOEMAL PSYCHOLOGY AND MENTAL HYGIENE. 

A study of abnormal mental phenomena in their relation to normal life, 
including such topics as sensation; perception; thought; sleep; dreams; hyp- 
nosis; disassociation; the psychoneuroses ; personality disorders, especially of 
childhood; the fundamental principles of mental hygiene. Three hours, first 
semester. Junior and Senior elective. Prerequisite, Psychology 11-12, or 
or 21. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barkley. 



Department of Psychology 119 

44. EXPERIMENTAL CHILD STUDY. 

Designed to give students practical experience in the application of prin- 
ciples and methods of experimental child study. Students will conduct a series 
of elementary experiments with children. Three hours, second semester. 
Junior and Senior elective. Prerequisite, Psychology 26. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Chitester. 

45. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

The aim of this course is to give the student training in laboratory tech- 
niques and in the use of satisfactory methods of treating data. A suitable 
number of classical experiments taken from several fields of psychology will 
be given. In addition, each individual or the group as a whole will take up 
some minor special problem. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Barkley. 



DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

Professors Barney, Underwood, Hooke; Associate Professors 
Miller, Laird, Hardre, LaRochelle; Assistant Professors 
Abbott, Cutting, Kelley; Instructor Taylor. 

FRENCH 

I AND 2. BEGINNING COUESE. 

Fraser and Squair: Complete Grammar; Monvert; La Belle France; com- 
position based on text read, dictation, conversation. In this course special 
emphasis is laid on pronunciation, the use of pronouns, the regular conjuga- 
tions, and the more common irregular verbs. Three hours, for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Kelley, Miss Taylor. 

3 AND 4. SECOND YEAR COUESE. 

Hugo: Cosette; Daudet: Neuf Contes Choisis; Merimee: Colomoa; Labiche 
and Martin: Le Voyage de M. Perrichon; Daudet: Tartarin de Tarascon; 
Carnahan: Short Eeview Grammar. Conversation based on texts read, review 
of grammatical principles, and work on irregular verbs. Three hours, for the 
year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller, Mr. Kelley, Miss Taylor. 

5 AND 6. LITEEATUEE AND ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

France: Le Crime de Sylvestre Bonnard; Moliere: I'Avare; Buffum: 
French Short Stories; Hugo: Hernani; Feuillet: Le Boman d'un Jeune 
Homme Pauvre; Balzac: Cinq Scenes de la Comedie Humaine; Fraser and 
Squair: French Grammar; Koren: French Composition; conversation based 
on texts read, completion of irregular verbs. Three hours, for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Underwood, Mr. Hooke, Miss Miller, Miss 
Laird. 

II AND 12. ELEMENTAEY CONYEESATION. 

This course is intended as a Sophomore elective in French for those who 
desire to gain proficiency in conversation. Those who have completed French 
5 and 6, but are not yet ready for French 51 and 52, will also be admitted. 
Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hardre, Mr. 
Hooke. 



120 The North Carolina College for Women 

25. SUBVEY COURSE. 

Lectures, translations in class, and reports from assigned readings on the 
general development of French literature from the beginning to 1600. This 
course will give the student a general basis for more specific! work in litera- 
ture. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

26. SUBVEY OF MODERN FBENCH LITEBATURE. 

A continuation of Course 25. This course covers in outline the last three 
centuries and forms a basis for more specific study. Three hours, second 
semester. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

27 AND 28. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY LITEBATUBE. 

The aim of this course is to give a comprehensive view of the literature 
of the period and of the conditions under which it was produced. The follow- 
ing books will form the basis of the course: Corneille: Le Cid, Horace, 
Polyeucte, Le Menteur; Pascal: Les Provinciates; La Bochef oucauld : Max- 
imes; Mme. de Sevigne: Lettres; Moliere: Les Precieuses Ridicules, Tartuffe, 
L'Avare; Bacine: Berenice, Andromaque, Athalie; La Bruyere: Caracteres; 
Boileau: L' Art Poetique; La Fontaine: Fables. Three hours for the year. 
Prerequisite, French 5 and 6. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Laird. 

29 AND 30. EIGHTEENTH CENTUBY LITEBATUBE. 

This course will take up the progress of the various genres through the 
century, and, in connection, present the more important ideas of the great 
French thinkers of the time who did so much to prepare the way for modern 
tolerance, democracy, and liberty. Three hours, for the year. Prerequisite, 
French 5 and 6. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Underwood. 

31 AND 32. FBENCH BOMANTICISM. 

The aim of this course is an intelligent appreciation of the Bomantie Move- 
ment. The following are the more important texts to be considered: Chateau- 
Briand: Les Martyrs', Mme. de Stael: De Allemagne; Hugo: Hernani, Selected 
Poems; Lamartine: Meditations, Jocelyn; Musset: Selected Poems and Com- 
edies; Vigny: Poemes Anciens et Modernes, Cinq-Mars; Dumas: Antony; 
Gautier: Emaux et Camees. Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester 
hours. Miss Miller. 

35 AND 36. DIX - NEUVIEME SIECLE. 

This course will be conducted entirely in French, and therefore should 
prove a valuable addition to the conversation courses. Some phase of Nine- 
teenth or Twentieth Century literature will be discussed by lectures and reports, 
according to the needs of the class. Three hours, for the year. Credit, six 
semester hours. Mr. Hooke. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

37. AND 38. CONTEMPOBABY FBENCH DBAMA. 

In this course French drama produced since the war will be the main sub- 
ject of study. Aside from various single texts, the students will have access 
to the Petite Illustration and other sources for the text and actual reproduc- 
tion of scenes from contemporary plays. Three hours, for the year. Credit, 
six semester hours. Mr. Hooke. 

51 AND 52. SPEAKING AND WBITING FBENCH. 

This course is conducted wholly in French. Its aim is to give a more 
intimate knowledge of France as it is today, together with the ability to carry 
on an ordinary conversation in French. Three hours, for the year. Pre- 
requisite, French 5 and 6. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hardre. 



Department of Romance Languages 121 

53 AND 54. FRENCH COMPOSITION. 

The aim of this course is to give the student a comprehensive review of 
French grammar and a thorough grounding in the principles of French com- 
position. During the latter part of the second semester, special attention is 
given to the study of French letter-writing, both social and commercial. Three 
hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. Hardre. 

61. GEAMMAE EEVIEW. 

Professional review of one or more grammars used in the high schools of 
the state. The main principles of grammar will be taken up with a view to 
organizing previous knowledge. Three hours, first semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

62. PHONETICS AND PEONUNCIATION. 

A course in both scientific and practical phonetics. Beginning with the 
description of correct position of the vocal organs for the reproduction of the 
sounds represented by the symbols of the International Phonetic Association, 
the rules for the pronunciation of single words are learned and fixed by much 
practice in phonetic transcription. The students hear the sounds from records 
made by native French professors. This course should be taken by all those 
who expect to teach French. Three hours, second semester. Credit, three 
semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

63 AND 64. EEALIA AND EEVIEW. 

This course is offered for prospective teachers. Materials and where to 
obtain them are described. Projects calling for the use of realia are assigned. 
One hour, for the year. Open only to Seniors and Graduates. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

71 AND 72. CHOSES FEANCAISES. 

A general information course on France and the French people. There will 
be some consideration of geography and history as a necessary background, 
followed by a study of French national traits, home life, and institutions. 
This course is intended to give the student an inspirational background for the 
study of French similar to that obtained by travel, and to give the prospective 
teacher of that language a fund of information useful in her chosen profession. 
Two hours, for the year. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Laird. 

101. THE EAELY FEENCH NOVEL. 

Eeading, reports, discussion, and some class translation from the sources 
and beginning of the novel in France to 1800. Three hours, for the first semes- 
ter. Open only to Seniors and Graduates. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Barney. 

102. MODEEN FEENCH NOVEL. 

Similar to Course 101 in method. Both courses should be elected by those 
who wish to gain ease of translation by doing a considerable amount of read- 
ing. Three hours, for the second semester. Open only to Seniors and Grad- 
uates. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Barney. 

SPANISH 

1 AND 2. BEGINNING COUESE. 

Hills and Ford: Spanish Grammar for Colleges; Shevill: A First Reader in 
Spanish; Benevente: Tres Comedias. Thorough drill is given in pronunciation 
and other oral work along with the important principles of grammar, so that 



122 The North Carolina College for Women 

the student may be able to produce as well as understand the ordinary phrases 
of everyday life. Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
LaRochelle, Miss Abbott, Miss Cutting. 

3 AND 4. SECOND YEAR COURSE. 

Seymour and Carnahan: Review, Grammar; Harrison: An Intermediate 
Spanish Header; Morrison: Tres Comedias; Hills and Reinhardt: Spanish 
Short Stories; Eschrich: Fortuna y el Placer de no Hacer Nada; Carter and 
Malloy: Cuentos Castellanos. Conversation and composition based on texts 
read, review of grammatical principles, and work on irregular verbs. Three 
hours, for the year. Credit, three semester hours. Miss LaRochelle, Miss 
Abbott, Miss Cutting. 

5 AND 6. LITERATURE AND ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

The Spanish novel will be the principal object of study in this course, with 
emphasis on the Twentieth Century period. There will also be drill on gram- 
mar and writing of composition. Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semes- 
ter hours. Miss LaRochelle. 

11 AND 12. ELEMENTARY CONVERSATION. 

This course is intended as a Sophomore or Junior elective in Spanish for 
those who desire to gain proficiency in conversation. It ranks as a third-year 
course. Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Cutting. 

21 AND 22. BENITO PEREZ GALDOS. 

This course will take up an intensive study of the life and works of Galdos, 
the greatest literary genius which Spain produced after the Golden Century. 
There will be practice also in the preparation of the oral and written reports 
in Spanish. Three hours, for the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
LaRochelle. 

25 AND 26. SURVEY COURSE. 

This course will serve as an introduction to the general field of Spanish 
literature from its origin to the present day. Lectures, readings, and reports 
will, in so far as possible, be done in English. Two hours, for the year. 
Credit, four semester hours. Miss Abbott. 

23 AND 24. SPANISH DRAMA OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 

This course will trace the development of the drama from the Romantic 
Movement until the close of the Nineteenth Century. Dramatists include 
Martinez de la Rosa, El Duque de Rivas, Garcia de Guiterrez, Hartenbusch, 
Ventura de la Vega, Tamayo y Baus, and Ramon de la Cruz. Three hours, for 
the year. Credit, six semester hours. Miss LaRochelle. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

35. DON QUIXOTE. 

This course presents an opportunity to read this great masterpiece, with 
some consideration of its setting and value as literature. One hour, for the 
first semester. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Barney. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

36. LOPE DE VEGA OR DON QUIXOTE. 

Similar in method to Course 35. One hour, for the first semester. Credit, 
one semester hour. Mr. Barney. 
(Not given in 1932-1933.) 



Department of Romance Languages 123 

53 AND 54. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. 

A comprehensive review of the principles of Spanish grammar and their 
application in practical composition, letter writing, social and commercial, and 
original expression. Two hours, for the year. Prerequisite, Spanish 11 and 
12. Credit, four semester hours. Miss Abbott. 

(Not given in 1932-1933.) 

71 AND 72. SPANISH LIFE AND CUSTOMS. 

A study of the history of the civilization of the Spanish people and its influ- 
ence as reflected in their life and customs. Lectures with lantern slides illus- 
trating Spanish life and art; assigned reading in Spanish newspapers and 
magazines; composition based upon themes discussed. One hour for the year. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Abbott. 

ITALIAN 

1 AND 2. BEGINNING COURSE. 

Covello and Giacobbe: Italian Grammar; Goldoni: II Vero Amico ; Bar- 
rili: Una Notte Bizzarra; Wilkins and Altrocchi: Italian Short Stories. 
Exact pronunciation will be one of the aims of this course. On completion 
of the course, students will be prepared to read Dante and classical authors 
of similar difficulty. Three hours, for the year. This may not oe elected by 
students in the School of Music before the Junior year. Sophomore elective 
for A.B. students who have completed one year of college Latin, French, or 
Spanish. Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller. 

3 AND 4. SECOND YEAE COURSE. 

This is a continuation of Course 1 and 2. After a further grounding in 
grammar principles, Dante's Inferno and selections from Petrarch, Boccaccio, 
and other authors will be read as time permits. Three hours, for the year. 
Credit, six semester hours. Miss Miller. 



PART IV— ORGANIZATION 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

THE GRADUATE DIVISION 

THE EXTENSION DIVISION 

THE SUMMER SESSION DIVISION 

THE LIBRARY 



THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

William C. Smith, L.H.D., Dean 

FACULTIES AND DEPARTMENTS 

I. Languages and Literature — "Winfield S. Barney, Ph.D., 
Chairman. English, Latin, Romance Languages, German, 
Library Instruction. 

II. Social Sciences — Walter Clinton Jackson, LL.D., Chair- 
man. History, Economics, Political Science, Sociology. 

III. Mathematics and Pure Science — John Paul Givler, A.M., 
Chairman. Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics, Psy- 
chology, Health. 

The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is the center of the 
North Carolina College for Women, out of which the professional 
schools have grown and around which they are grouped. Its in- 
struction is foundational for the work of the professional schools, 
and it may be said to be the general policy of the Institution to re- 
quire two years of college training before specialization is begun. 

The purpose of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is, first, 
to secure to its students a liberal education, including both the hu- 
manities and the sciences; second, to furnish especially arranged 
curricula preparatory to later professional and technical studies in 
Education, Music, Home Economics, Library Science, and Physical 
Education. 

The College confers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, and Bache- 
lor of Arts in Library Science; of Bachelor of Science in Home 



The College op Liberal Arts and Sciences 125 

Economics, in Music, in Physical Education, and in Commerce; 
and of Master of Arts. 

Under the modified elective system a student who desires to 
prepare for teaching may specialize to a considerable extent in the 
subject which she wishes to teach, and may also find time for 
courses in education and related subjects of interest to teachers. 

Students who desire to devote a considerable part of their study 
to specific preparation for some calling other than teaching may 
select major courses of study in the Faculties of Language and 
Literature, the Social Sciences, or Mathematics and the Pure 
Sciences. 

Students desiring to become laboratory technicians in medical 
work, or to pursue a course in Medicine, should elect both Biology 
and Chemistry — a major in one, a minor in the other. 



126 The North Carolina College for Women 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

John H. Cook, Ph.D., Dean 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

FOR 

Primary Teachers 

Intermediate and Grammar Grade Teachers 

High School Teachers 

Rural School Teachers 

Principals and Supervisors 

The School of Education is a professional school for teachers. 
It affords opportunity for specialization in different phases of edu- 
cational work. 



CERTIFICATES 



Courses are offered which meet in full the certification require- 
ments of the State of North Carolina for A certificates. Those 
who are graduated from the North Carolina College for Women may 
by deciding as to their field of teaching in the Junior year choose 
the academic and professional courses which will enable them to get 
a high school certificate in two subjects, a grammar grade or a pri- 
mary certificate. Certificates in Home Economics, Physical Educa- 
tion, and Public School Music may be secured by taking the courses 
elsewhere in this catalogue for the teachers of these subjects. 

HIGH SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 

The North Carolina Class A high school certificate requires 
twenty-one hours of professional work which shall include three 
semester hours of each of the following: Educational Psychology, 
Technique of Teaching or High School Problems. Materials and 
Methods in each subject to be taught, and Observation and Directed 
Teaching in one or both fields of teaching. Students will be given 
certificates to teach in two fields. 

The North Carolina State Certification regulations also pre- 
scribe minimum subject matter requirements for teaching in the 
different fields as follows: 

For English — Twenty-four semester hours, which shall include 
grammar, composition, and rhetoric ; American Literature and 
English Literature. 

For French — Eighteen semester hours, based on two units of 
entrance credit in French, or eighteen hours in addition to Ele- 
mentary French. 



The School of Education 127 

For History — Twenty-four semester hours, which shall include 
eighteen semester hours of ancient, medieval, modern European 
and American history ; and six semester hours of Political Science 
and Economics. 

For Latin — Twenty-four semester hours, based on two units of 
entrance credit in Latin. This requirement will be reduced six 
semester hours for each additional unit of entrance credit. 

For Mathematics — Fifteen semester hours. 

For Science — Thirty semester hours, which shall include Biol- 
ogy, Chemistry, Physics, and Geography. 

For Commercial Subjects — Forty-five semester hours, which 
shall include Stenography, Typewriting, Accounting, and Office 
Management. 

GRAMMAR GRADE CERTIFICATES 

The requirements of the North Carolina State regulations for 
Grammar Grade A certificates are as follows : 

1. English 12 S. H. 

a. Composition 6 S. H. 

b. Children's Literature (English 66) 2 S. H. 

c. Elective 4 S. H. 

2. American History and Citizenship 6 S. H. 

3. Geography 6 S. H. 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts 9 S. H. 

This shall include: 

a. Drawing 

b. Industrial Arts 

c. Music 

5. Physical and Health Education 6 S. H. 

This shall include a minimum of: 

a. Physical Education 2 S. H. 

b. Hygiene and Health Education 2 S. H. 

6. Education 24 S. H. 

This shall include: 

a. Education 43-44 

b. Education 63 

c. Psychology 26 

d. Psychology 22 

e. E'ducation 33 

f. Education 61 

PRIMARY CERTIFICATES 

The requirements for the Primary A certificate are as follows: 

1. English 12 S. H. 

a. Composition 6 S. H. 

b. Education 42 2 S. H. 

c. Elective 4 S. H. 

2. American History and Citizenship 6 S. H. 



128 The North Carolina College for Women 

3. Biology 33-35 6 S. H. 

4. Fine and Industrial Arts 9 S. H. 

This shall include: 

a. Drawing 

b. Industrial Arts 

c. Music 

5. Physical and Health Education 6 S. H. 

This shall include a minimum of: 

a. Physical Education 2 S. H. 

b. Hygiene and Health Education 2 S. H. 

6. Education 24 S. H. 

This shall include: 

a. Education 41A, 41B 

b. Education 63 

c. Psychology 26 

d. Psychology 22 

e. Education 61 

CERTIFICATE TO TEACH HIGH SCHOOL COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS 

The following course of study will give the student the degree Bachelor 
of Science in Commerce and a certificate to teach commercial subjects in 
the high schools of North Carolina: 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



English 1-2 

English 5-6 

Science or Mathematics 

History 1-2 

Foreign Language* .... 
Hygiene 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

English 11-12 

Psychology 21-22 

Principles Economics 11-12 

American History or Foreign Language* 

Electives 



JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 



1st 


2nd 


Sem. 


Sem. 


3 


3 


1 


1 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


2 


2 


15 


15 


1st 


2nd 


Sem. 


Sem. 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 



15 15 



Among the 60 semester hours of the Junior and Senior years the student 
must take fifteen hours of Education and 39 remaining hours of Commerce 
required by the State Board of Education. The remaining 6 hours are 
elective. The 15 hours of Education shall include Technique of Teaching or 
High School Problems, Materials and Methods in Commercial Studies, and 
Observation and Directed Teaching in Commercial Studies. 



* A student choosing to take only one year of foreign language in college must con- 
tinue a foreign language offered for entrance. 



The School of Education 129 

The 39 additional hours of Commerce (the six hours of Principles of 
Economics in the Sophomore year making the total 45 hours of required 
Commerce) must include: 

Commerce 21-22 (Shorthand and Typewriting) 12 hours 

Commerce 24 (Office Management) 3 hours 

Economics 34 (Accounting) 3 hours 



Total 18 hours 

The remaining 21 hours of Commerce shall be taken from such offerings 
in Economics, Commerce, and other departments as meet the approval of 
the State Board of Education. 



PRINCIPALS AND SUPERVISORS 

Attention is called to the courses for the benefit of principals 
and supervisors. The training school offers opportunities for assist- 
ing in this work. Only teachers of approved experience should pre- 
pare for principalships and supervision. Those preparing for these 
positions should make up their programs after consultation with 
the Dean of the School of Education. 



TEACHING UNDER SUPERVISION 

Opportunity for teaching experience is varied according to the 
needs of prospective teachers. The Training School, under the con- 
trol of the Department of Education, is located on the campus. 
Eleven grades are represented in the enrollment of more than 400 
pupils. Twenty-five supervisors in co-operation with the Head of 
the Department direct the teaching of student teachers. 



130 



The North Carolina College for Women 



THE SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Wade R. Brown, Mus.D., Dean 



COURSES IN MUSICAL THEORY AND MUSIC EDUCATION 
COURSES IN APPLIED MUSIC 

The School of Music offers regular courses leading to the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science in Music, with major in Piano, Organ, 
Violin, Voice, Public School Music, or Orchestral Instruments. 
Applied Music may be taken by students of any of the regular 
college courses provided the music added is within the limit of 
hours allowed as the maximum. 

The fees for lessons in Applied Music (Piano, Organ, Violin, 
and Voice) are given under the head of " Expenses." Consult 
index. 

CURRICULUM IN MUSIC 

Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Music with the major in 
Piano, Organ, or Violin: 



SEM. 
FRESHMAN HRS. 

Music 1-2 6 

Music 3-4 4 

Applied Music 

Piano or Violin 1-2 6 

English 1-2 6 

German or French 6 

Health 1-2 4 



32 



SEM. 
SOPHOMORE HRS. 

Music 11-12 6 

Music 13-14 4 

Applied Music 

Piano, Organ, or Violin 11-12 . . 8 

English 11-12 6 

German or French 6 



30 



SEM. 
JUNIOR HRS. 

Music 21-22 6 

Applied Music 

Piano, Organ, or Violin 21-22 . . 8 

Psychology 21-22 6 

Teaching Methods in Major 

Subject or Elective 6 

Elective* 4 



30 



SENIOR HRS. 

Music 31-32 6 

Applied Music 

Piano, Organ, or Violin 31-32 . . 10 
Practice Teaching 61-62 or Elective 6 
Elective* 8 



30 



Students majoring in Organ must elect Music 37-38. 



The School of Music 



131 



The course for students majoring in Voice is as follow; 



FRESHMAN 



SEM. 
HRS. 



Music 1-2 6 

Music 3-4 4 

Applied Music 

Voice 1-2 3 

Piano 3-4 3 

English 1-2 6 

German or French 6 

Health 1-2 4 



32 



SOPHOMORE 



SEM. 
HRS. 



Music 11-12 6 

Music 13-14 4 

Applied Music 

Voice 11-12 4 

Piano 13-14 4 

English 11-12 6 

German or French 6 



30 



SEM. 
JUNIOR HRS. 

Music 21-22 6 

Voice 21-22 6 

Music 15-16 4 

Psychology 21-22 or 26 6 

Teaching Methods or Elective ... 4 

Elective 4 



30 



SEM. 
SENIOR HRS. 

Music 31-32 6 

Voice 31-32 6 

Sight Singing 47-48 2 

Practice Teaching 65-66 or 

Elective 6 

Elective 4 

Elective 6 



30 



The course for students majoring in Public School Music is as follows: 



SEM. 
FRESHMAN HRS. 

Music 1-2 6 

Music 3-4 4 

Piano 1-2 6 

English 1-2 6 

German or French 6 

Health 1-2 4 



32 



SEM. 
SOPHOMORE HRS. 

Music 11-12 6 

Music 13-14 4 

Music 15-16 4 

Piano 17-18 4 

English 11-12 6 

German or French 6 



30 



SEM. 
JUNIOR HRS. 

Music 43-44 6 

Music 47-48 2 

Music 29-30 2 

Music 49-50 4 

Voice 23-24 4 

Psychology 21-22 6 

Education 63-69 6 



30 



SEM. 
SENIOR HRS. 

Music 35-36 4 

Music 45-46 4 

Music 63-64 6 

Voice 37-38 4 

Education 6 

Elective 6 



30 



132 



The North Carolina College for Women 



Courses in Public School Music with major in Orchestral Instruments. 
Freshman and Sophomore years, same as major in Violin. 



SEM. 
JUNIOR HRS. 

Violin 23-24 6 

Education 63-68 6 

Psychology 21-22 6 

Violin Methods 67-68 6 

Elective 6 



30 



SEM. 
SENIOR HRS. 

Violin 37-38 6 

Music 45-46 4 

Music 63-64 6 

Education 6 

Music 49-50 2 

Elective 6 



30 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS IN MUSIC 

Upon the satisfactory completion of the regular four years' 
theoretical and literary course, together with the four years ' course 
in Applied Music, the candidate for the Bachelor of Science in 
Music degree must satisfactorily perform programs conforming 
to the following schedule : 

For Piano Students. A concerto or chamber-music work of 
advanced difficulty. One of the Beethoven sonatas of the middle 
period. Selections from the more important works of Schumann, 
Chopin, Grieg, or other standard composers of the romantic and 
modern schools. 

For Vocal Students. An operatic aria. An aria from a 
standard oratorio. N A group of songs of Brahms, Schubert, Schu- 
mann, Jensen, or Franz. A group of modern songs. 

For Organ Students. One of the great preludes and fugues 
of Bach. A sonata of Mendelssohn, Guilmant, or Rhineberger. 
Selections from the works of Thiele, Widor, Merkel, and other 
standard composers. 

For Violin Students. A standard sonata for piano and violin. 
A concerto of advanced difficulty. Selections from the more im- 
portant works of Bach, Vieuxtemps, Wieniawski, and other stand- 
ard writers. 

STUDENTS' RECITALS 

Students' recitals are given weekly, at which time works 
studied in the classroom are performed before the students of the 
Music Department. All music students are required to attend these 
recitals, and to take part in them when requested to do so. These 
semi-public appearances are of great assistance in enabling the 
student to acquire that ease and self-possession so essential to a 
successful public performance. 



The School of Music 133 

ARTIST AND FACULTY RECITALS 

Not less important than classroom instruction is the opportunity 
of hearing good music rendered by artists of superior ability. To 
afford students this opportunity a regular series of recitals is given 
each year, the best artists available being secured. 

Recitals and concerts are given frequently by members of the 
Music Faculty during the school year. 

COLLEGE CHORUS 

The College Chorus, made up of students, members of the 
faculty, and men of the city (about 125 voices), study each 
year one or more of the great choral works which, with the assist- 
ance of soloists and orchestra, they present in public performance. 

During the session 1931-1932, Handel's Messiah and Gounod's 
Messe Solennelle were sung. 

The conditions of membership are : A voice of fair effectiveness, 
a correct ear, some knowledge of musical notation, and regularity 
in attendance. Open to all students of the College who can meet 
the conditions of membership. The chorus is under the direction 
of the Dean of the School of Music. 

MADRIGAL CLUB 

The Madrigal Club is an organization of the Public School 
Music Department. All Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors major- 
ing in Public School Music, and the teachers in this department, 
make up its membership. Juniors and Seniors who have Public 
School Music for their minor subject may be elected to associate 
membership in the club. Weekly meetings and rehearsals are held, 
when music suitable for women's voices is studied. Programs are 
prepared and given for special occasions. Student officers admin- 
ister to the affairs of the club, while the singing is directed by the 
head of the Public School Music Department. 

ORCHESTRA 

Membership in the College Orchestra is open to all students 
who play an orchestral instrument with a fair degree of accuracy. 

Rehearsals are held every week throughout the college year, 
and attendance is required of students who are studying an or- 
chestral instrument, under the supervision of the Department of 
Music. 

A Junior Orchestra is maintained for students who cannot 
meet the membership requirements of the College Orchestra. 

Both organizations are under the direction of the Violin De- 
partment. 



134 The North Carolina College for Women 

ANNUAL HIGH SCHOOL MUSIC CONTEST 

One of the major activities sponsored by the School of Music 
for the improvement of music in the State is the annual North 
Carolina Music Contest for High Schools. District elimination con- 
tests for the town and consolidated high schools are held in thirteen 
centers in the State, and the winners in these district contests, with 
the enrollments from the large city schools having an attendance 
of more than 500 students, enter the annual State contest held at 
the College in April of each year. The attendance at the twelfth 
annual contest, held in April, 1931, was 2,394 students from 81 
different schools. One hundred and sixteen high schools partici- 
pated in the State and district contests. These annual performances 
have given the music teachers, supervisors, and students a splendid 
opportunity to compare their work with that done in the other 
schools. The contest has in this way made a real contribution to 
the rapid development of music in the schools of the State. 



The School of Home Economics 



135 



THE SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

Blanche E. Shaffer, A.M., Dean 



TEACHER TRAINING 

INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

For entrance requirements for B.S. Course, see "Admission of 

Students." 



TEACHER TRAINING IN HOME ECONOMICS 
Bachelor of Science — Teacher Training Course in Home Economics 

This course, leading to Bachelor of Science degree, has been 
approved by the Federal Board of Vocational Education. Before 
receiving their degrees, students are required to have had two 
years of experience in housekeeping. The work in the Home 
Management House may be counted as part of this experience. 



FRESHMAN 



First Semester 



HRS. 

Biology 3 or Physics 3 3 

English 1 3 

History 1 3 

Home Economics 2 or Art 1 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Home Economics 3 1 



Second Semester 



HRS. 



Biology 3 or Physics 3 3 

English 2 3 

History 2 3 

Home Economics 2 or Art 1 3 

Foreign Language 3 



16 
SOPHOI 



First Semester 



HRS. 

English 11 3 

Chemistry 1 or 3 3 

Biology 77 or 81 3 

Home Economics 11 or 12 3 

Foreign Language 3 



Second Semester 



15 



HRS. 



English 12 3 

Chemistry 2 or 3 3 

Biology 77 or 81 3 

Home Economics 11 or 12 3 

Foreign Language 3 



15 
JUNI I 



First Semester 



HRS. 

Chemistry 23 3 

Psychology 23 3 

Home Economics 21 3 

Art 23 3 

Economics 25 3 



15 



Second Semester 



15 



HRS. 



Chemistry 24 3 

Education 66 or Institutional 

Management 20 3 

Art 22 3 

Home E'conomics 24 3 

Home Economics 26 3 



15 



136 



The North Carolina College for Women 



SENIOR 



First Semester 



HRS. 

Sociology 21 3 

Home Economics 31 3 

Home Economics 33 2 

Home Economics 61 or Institu- 
tional Management 41 2 

Home Economics 63 or 

Institutional Management 43 . . 3 
Elective 2 or 3 



15 or 16 



Second Semester 



Home Economics 32 3 

Home Economics 34 2 

Art 35 3 

Home Economics 62 or Institu- 
tional Management 42 2 

Home Economics 64 or Institu- 
tional Management 44 3 

Elective 2 or 3 



15 or 16 



ELECTIVE COURSES IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Certain courses in the School of Home Economics are open as 
electives to students in other schools. Home Economics 2, 11, and 
Art 1, 22, 23, 35, not to exceed twelve semester hours, may be chosen, 
subject to the approval of the deans of the College of Liberal Arts 
and the School of Home Economics. Courses Art 1, H.E. 2, and 
H.E. 11 are open to Sophomores. Courses Art 22, 23, 29, 30, and 35 
are open to Juniors and Seniors. 

The elective course in the first semester of the Senior year in 
the Teacher Training Course must be in the general field of edu- 
cation. The elective course in the second semester may be in any 
field of academic work other than Home Economics. 



The Commercial Department 137 

THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

E. J. Forney, Director 



Applicants for admission to the Commercial Department must 
be graduates of an approved high school, and able to present the 
required fifteen units of college entrance work. 

The course consists of work in Shorthand, Typewriting, and 
Bookkeeping. Students taking this course are required, in addition 
to the above work, to take during the first semester a two-hour 
course in Hygiene and, throughout the year, a two-hour course in 
Physical Education. 

SHORTHAND 

The original Isaac Pitman System of Shorthand is taught. It 
is the aim of the course to make practical shorthand writers — 
amanuenses and reporters. The inductive method of teaching pre- 
vails. The course is well graded, and the student is led, step by 
step, through easy and natural stages, to see, to think, and to act 
for herself. 

The work of the department is planned as far as possible to 
meet the needs of the students. The course at first embraces not 
only a study of principles, but the reading and writing in short- 
hand of a wide range of English classics. As the student advances, 
in order to acquaint her with the forces and machinery of the busi- 
ness world, actual business letters bearing upon various subjects 
are dictated and reproduced on the typewriter. 

As a majority of our students will ultimately engage in aman- 
uensis work, this feature is made the leading purpose of the course ; 
but reporting and the work pertaining thereto are not neglected; 
and when a student demonstrates that she can receive the higher 
work in shorthand to advantage, such dictation is given as will 
insure power, strength, and general information. Technical in- 
struction in the use of medical and legal terms is also given. 

STENOTYPY 

The Department offers a course in Stenotypy — Machine Short- 
hand. This course is designed particularly to meet the needs of 
reporters and those who desire to prepare themselves for high-class 
business work. The course will be offered to any student who elects 
it, but she must own a Stenotype machine, the cost of which is 
$60.00 cash, or $67.50, payable $17.50 on entrance and the balance 
in monthly installments of $10.00 each. 



138 The North Carolina College for Women 

TYPEWRITING 

Seventy typewriters are owned by the department. Skill in the 
use of the machine is not the only design of the instruction. Spe- 
cial attention is paid to accuracy, neatness, vocabulary, spelling, 
punctuation, and paragraphing. The instruction is purely prac- 
tical. The touch method is used. 

The Ediphone is now an essential part of modern office equip- 
ment. An extended course is offered in the use of this machine. 

BOOKKEEPING 

The course in bookkeeping and business practice is designed to 
meet modern business conditions. The inductive method of presen- 
tation prevails. Each transaction is presented to the student as 
much like the performance of actual business as possible. The stu- 
dent is taught self-reliance from the start. The course from the 
business standpoint is a comprehensive one ; it will make not only 
bookkeepers, but well-informed business women, thoroughly con- 
versant with all kinds of common commercial forms and blanks. 

The Burroughs adding machine is a part of the equipment, and 
all students in bookkeping are required to become familiar with 
its workings. The loose-leaf methods, so universally recognized 
today, form the basis of the course. 

The higher work in bookkeeping represents the best practice of 
expert accountants in this country, and students are taught the 
uses of special books adapted to many important lines of commerce. 

All students are required to become familiar with calculating 
machines in connection with the bookkeeping course. 

CERTIFICATES 

The diligent student can, in from five to eight months, acquire 
a speed of 80 to 120 words a minute in Pitman Shorthand and 
possibly 150 words a minute in Stenotypy, and certificates will be 
given to students who can write from dictation correctly at these 
rates. 

Business men who may be needing stenographers will, upon 
application, be put in correspondence with efficient help. 



The Graduate Division 139 

THE GRADUATE DIVISION 

Winfield S. Barney, Ph.D., Director 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

Graduates of the North Carolina College for Women and of 
other approved colleges and universities may register for graduate 
work with or without reference to securing an advanced degree. 
Graduates of other institutions must furnish official certificates of 
graduation and scholastic record. Those from institutions which 
had approved standing at the time of their entrance are eligible 
for graduate credit in courses carrying such credit. Some others 
may be approved after their records have been examined. Yet 
others may acquire graduate standing by additional preparation. 

Candidates for the Master's Degree should declare their inten- 
tion at or before registration, if possible, so that the adequacy of 
their preparation for their major and minor subjects may be de- 
termined, and that the head of the department in which the major 
lies may make the program of study and the Director of the 
Graduate Division officially endorse it. 

Such candidates are required to be in residence one full college 
year, or not less than four summer terms within a period of six 
years, and to complete not less than thirty semester hours of work 
in graduate courses or electives of senior rank. At least fourteen 
and not more than twenty-four of these hours must be in the major 
subject. One minor subject of not less than six hours is required. 

Acceptance of candidacy for a degree may be made at the end 
of the candidate's first summer session, or after the first scholar- 
ship report of the semester. 

Credit may be given toward the degree for four year-hours of 
work done elsewhere at institutions of high character, provided 
this work conforms to a coherent part of the candidate's program 
of study. In some cases five year-hours' credit may be given at 
the discretion of the Director after consultation with the head of 
the department in which the major study lies. 

For the Master of Arts degree the major subject may be chosen 
from any department in the three following divisions : 

Division I: Language and Literature 

Department of English. 

Department of Latin. 

Department of Romance Languages and Literature. 

Department of German. 



140 The North Carolina College for Women 

Division II: History, Education, and Social Sciences 
Department of History. 
Department of Education. 
Department of Economics and Sociology. 

Division III: Mathematics and Natural Sciences 
Department of Mathematics. 
Department of Biology. 
Department of Chemistry. 
Department of Physics. 
Department of Psychology. 

For the Master of Science degree the major must be in: 

Division IV: Home Economics 

Other requirements for the degree are an oral or written ex- 
amination on each course pursued, an average grade of good on 
such courses, the presentation of a satisfactory thesis, and the 
deposit of three typewritten copies of this thesis, two of which must 
be bound, with the Graduate Committee to be preserved in the 
College Library. 

Candidates should have their thesis completed and passed on in 
April, if they wish to receive their degree at commencement. 

Regulations as to form of thesis, etc., may be obtained from the 
Director. 



The Extension Division 141 

THE EXTENSION DIVISION 

C. E. Teague, A.B., Director 



From its organization in 1891, the College has felt and acknowl- 
edged its duty to the great body of people beyond its walls. Thus, 
from the beginning, extension work has been a part of its program. 

The stated purpose of the Extension Division is to reorganize 
and co-ordinate the extension activities already in existence at the 
College and to inaugurate and develop new lines of service to the 
people of the State. 

A service of especial benefit to the teachers is the establishment 
of extension classes in various educational centers. These classes 
meet weekly, generally in the late afternoon, at night, or on Satur- 
days for a period of one hour and forty minutes. Each class meets 
sixteen or twenty-four times during the year. Regular members of 
the College faculty hold these classes, and to those teachers taking 
them, full college credit of two or three semester hours is granted. 
These extension classes thus serve the teachers in two ways : First, 
by enabling them to continue teaching and at the same time, pro- 
vided the usual requirements concerning entrance conditions are 
fulfilled, to work for a college degree ; and second, by enabling 
them to apply this work towards the renewal or raising of the 
grade of their certificates. By passing courses amounting to eight 
semester hours, a teacher does work equivalent in value to that per- 
formed during one summer session. To secure a course fifteen stu- 
dents are necessary. 

The attempt is made, where it is desired, to have two two-hour 
courses available in the fall and two more two-hour courses avail- 
able in the spring, whenever extension classes are given. This makes 
possible the equivalent of a summer session with eight hours of col- 
lege and certificate credit. Three-hour courses are also available. 
In order to secure two hours of college or certificate credit the stu- 
dent must have successfully completed the work in sixteen two-hour 
recitation periods. For three hours' credit twenty-four two-hour 
periods are necessary. To secure six hours of credit three two-hour 
courses, or two three-hour courses, must be successfully completed. 
The maximum credit that may be received in one winter is eight 
hours. 

A number of extension classes were held during the school year 
1930-1931. A variety of courses in English, History, Science, Edu- 
cation, and other subjects has been offered. It is expected that in 
the future additional courses of similar scope and purpose will be 
offered. The College will attempt to give any course asked for, 
provided the minimum of fifteen students can be secured and the 
point can be reached. 



142 The North Carolina College for Women 

Through its Extension Division, the College also participates 
in such activities as school surveys, school inspections, mental and 
educational tests and measurements. Through the Extension Di- 
vision, teachers may secure books and other professional literature 
from the library ; information of a professional nature, and advice 
and suggestions in meeting their individual problems. Lecturers 
will be sent out to address schools and teachers' meetings on de- 
sired subjects. 

To the literary and civic clubs, parent-teacher associations, and 
such organizations, the Extension Division offers a similar service. 
A program for any occasion, or a series of programs, will be ar- 
ranged. To aid in the study and development of these programs, 
books and other material are lent. If desired, lecturers are sent 
out to address club meetings. These lecturers, who are regular 
members of the College faculty, go out on the condition that the 
actual expenses of the trip be paid by the club or community 
visited. The Extension Division has prepared a list of lectures, 
given by members of the faculty, which are adapted to the needs 
of literary societies, civic organizations, parent-teacher associa- 
tions, schools, educational meetings, church and religious gather- 
ings, and other societies. A copy of this bulletin will be sent to 
any one making application for it. 

For home-makers, the Extension Division provides expert ad- 
vice and suggestions when called upon to do so. It is glad to make 
arrangements for sending out lecturers on home economics sub- 
jects. Dean Shaffer will personally answer any question relative 
to child care, house planning, and such subjects. Through corre- 
spondence and personal visits there is possibility of a large service. 

As a part of the extension work the library extends its services 
to the people of the State. With the co-operation of the members 
of the faculty on technical and highly specialized questions, its ref- 
erence department acts as an information bureau in preparing bib- 
liographies and in supplying information on miscellaneous ques- 
tions. The circulation department sends out books on any subject, 
especially in connection with the club study program and those of 
professional interest to teachers. At the request of librarians and 
teachers, lists of books for school libraries are prepared. 

The Extension Division is ready to work with the various com- 
munities of the State in recreational surveys and in planning their 
playgrounds and play programs. Members of the College staff are 
prepared to visit communities, assist the local people in making the 
surveys, and help put through the recreation program. The Divi- 
sion will also be glad to help organize and conduct group confer- 
ences on community organization, leadership, and recreation. It 
can aid in working out general community programs, such as work 
for boys and girls, Boy Scout work, girl club work. 



The Extension Division 143 

A series of bulletins, prepared by faculty members of various 
departments in the College, which are of interest to teachers and 
also of general interest to the people of the State, is being pub- 
lished. These cover a variety of subjects, from giving and scoring 
mental tests to millinery. Other bulletins are being prepared. 
Lists will be furnished on application. 

The Extension Division is much interested in rendering service 
to the State Parent-Teacher Association. The general work of or- 
ganization, helping branches that desire assistance, distributing the 
publications of the National Congress of Parents and Teachers, 
promoting all the various activities possible, and giving general 
service to the local branches, come under the general direction of 
the Division. In this connection the Parent -Teacher Bulletin, the 
State publication of the Parent-Teacher Association, is published 
by the Division and sent to a large list of officers, and those inter- 
ested in Parent-Teacher work. 

As another part of the service, members of the Division staff 
are glad to hold county-wide conferences for a day on Parent- 
Teacher Association methods. Such conferences include round- 
table discussion on ways, means, and methods of the various phases 
of work, lectures, and conferences in smaller groups. Such matters 
as community surveys for recreation, school, or religious purposes ; 
publicity and organization campaigns for bonds or other objectives, 
are gladly undertaken for any community that feels the need of 
this kind of assistance. 

The College is prepared to furnish workers for conferences and 
institutes dealing with the general range of activities and informa- 
tion covering the general field known as parental education. One- 
day, or longer programs, dealing with health, diets, training, social 
hygiene, psychology, habit formation, or other phases of child life 
can be planned. These conferences embody the institute plan, 
which means conferences, lectures, round-table and other discus- 
sion. Information that will instruct the parents, help them under- 
stand the child, his nature and his needs, and get them ready for 
better conduct as parents, will comprise the program for these 
meetings. 

In connection with the service the College is doing for the 
women of the State, it may be noted that it publishes the Federa- 
tion Bulletin for the State Federation of Women's Clubs. This 
is sent to officers of local federations as designated by the State 
President. 

Library Notes furnishes valuable information concerning acces- 
sions to the library. It is published monthly. 

The Extension Division offers to the people of the State an 
organized and efficient service in the study of matters of educa- 
tional, professional, and general interest. The resources of the Col- 



144 The North Carolina College for Women 

lege are available for the welfare of any community. The various 
Schools and Departments are glad to be of assistance in directing 
surveys; in providing extension classes, lectures, or concerts; in 
helping with the organization of community projects; in handling 
track meets, games, festivals, pageants; in answering inquiries; 
in sending out lists of books or other information; or in giving 
advice and suggestions on other subjects. 

Those desiring information or service of any kind should 
address such communications or requests to the Director of the 
Extension Division. 



The Summer Session Division 145 

THE SUMMER SESSION DIVISION 

John H. Cook, Ph.D., Director 



SCOPE OF SUMMER SESSION 

The summer sessions are designed to serve the following groups: 

1. Eural and city principals, supervisors, and superintendents. 

2. High school, upper grade, intermediate, primary, and rural teachers. 

3. College students who wish to earn extra credits, and those who have 
entered upon a college course but have been prevented from completing it. 

4. Teachers of special subjects, such as Home Economics, Penmanship, 
Public School Music, Piano, and Fine and Industrial Arts. 

5. Women who desire further instruction in the duties of citizenship. 

6. Supervisors of public school music. 

7. Teachers who hold baccalaureate degrees and wish to secure masters' 
degrees by work in the summer sessions. 

CERTIFICATION CREDITS 

Every course offered carries renewal and original certification credit 
either as a content, method, or general professional course. Teachers should 
find out from the state authorities before the beginning of the session just 
what is needed in order to renew or raise their certificates. Certificates, 
credit of all sorts, statements or letters in regard to standing should be 
brought and shown to advisers in order that the exact status of teaching 
may be understood. 

COLLEGE CREDITS 

Attention is called to the fact that most of the courses offered carry 
college credit. Those who are qualified to enter upon college work should 
write to the registrar of the College and satisfy admission requirements. 
The courses are organized with a view to helping and encouraging ambi- 
tious teachers to choose work with the definite purpose of graduating from 
college as an ultimate end. Proper sequence is provided for, thereby en- 
abling the student to continue her course in the ensuing fall, spring, or 
summer session. 

Courses for the special and general training of teachers are credited 
towards a degree. Professional and allied subjects with content courses 
needed by teachers may constitute more than one-third of the college course. 
This is a significant feature for teachers who want to make every course 
count toward a degree as well as toward a better certificate. But all col- 
lege regulations in respect to credits, required subjects, and other matters 
relating to degrees must be complied with. 

ROOMS AND BOARD 

One of the most vexatious problems confronting the woman in at- 
tendance upon the average summer school is the difficulty of securing a good 
and comfortable room in an atmosphere conducive to study. Students 
who secure rooms and board in our dormitories need have no fear in this 
matter. The rooms are clean, neatly furnished, well lighted and ventilated. 
Ample closet space is allotted each student. Good bathrooms, liberally sup- 
plied with hot and cold water, are on every hallway. Entire expenses for the 
summer session are $47.50. 

SPECIAL SUMMER SESSION BULLETIN 

A special bulletin descriptive of its Summer Session work is issued by 
the College in xlpril. Copies of this bulletin may be had upon application. 



146 The North Carolina College for Women 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION, 1931 
FIRST TERM 

BIOLOGY 

SI AND 2. GENERAL BIOLOGY. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Bookout, Miss Farlow. 

CHEMISTRY 

SI AND 2. GENEEAL CHEMISTRY. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Petty and others. 

S23. BRIEF COUESE IN OEGANIC CHEMISTRY. Credit, three semes- 
ter hours. Miss Schaeffer. 

ECONOMICS 

S25a. ELEMENTARY ECONOMICS. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Keister. 

S23a. PROBLEMS OF TAXATION IN NORTH CAROLINA. Credit, 
two semester hours, college or graduate. Mr. Keister. 

S24a. LABOR PROBLEMS. Credit, two semester hours, college or gradu- 
ate. Mr. Keister. 

S26a. TYPES OF INDUSTRY. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Smith. 

S26b. TYPES OF INDUSTRY. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Smith. 

ENGLISH 

S2. RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Summerell. 

S2b. ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Sum- 
merell. 

511. LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Winfield. 

512. LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Winfield. 

S17. INTERPRETATIVE READING. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Taylor. 

S20. PRESENTATION OF PLAYS. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Taylor. 

S24a. PRACTICAL WRITING. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. 

S48a, THE CONTEMPORARY NOVEL. Credit, two semester hours, col- 
lege or graduate. Mr. Hurley. 

S48d. CORRECTIVE ENGLISH. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Dunn. 

S50a. NINETEENTH CENTURY PROSE. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Gould. 

552. AMERICAN LITERATURE. Credit, three semester hours, college 
or graduate. Mr. Hall. 

553. AMERICAN FICTION. Credit, two semester hours, college or 
graduate. Mr. Hurley. 



The Summer Session Division 147 

S56. AMERICAN HUMOR, Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Hall. 

S58. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETEY. Credit, two semester 
hours, college or graduate. Mr. Smith. 

S66. THE TEACHING OF LITERATURE IN THE GRAMMAR 
GRADES. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Gould. 

571. THE LITERARY STUDY OF THE BIBLE. Credit, two semester 
hours, college or graduate. Mr. Smith. 

572. THE LITERARY STUDY OF THE BIBLE. Credit, two semester 
hours, college or graduate. Mr. Smith. 

S73 AND 74. POETRY OF KIPLING, MASEFIELD, AND THE MINOR 
POETS OF THE VICTORIAN AGE. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Hurley. 

583. FAMILIAR LETTERS. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Sum- 
merell. 

584. THE SHORT STORY. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Gould. 

S85a. THE WRITING OF SHORT NARRATIVES. Credit, two semester 
hours, college or graduate. Mr. Dunn. 

5106. LITERARY CRITICISM. Credit, two semester hours, college or 
graduate. Mr. Hall. 

5107. MYTHOLOGY. Credit, two semester hours, college or graduate. 
Mr. Wilson. 

S109. AMERICAN PRONUNCIATION. Credit, two semester hours, col- 
lege or graduate. Mr. Wilson. 

Sill. THE PHILOSOPHY OF PLATO. Credit, two semester hours, col- 
lege or graduate. Mr. Wilson. 

GEOGRAPHY AND NATURE STUDY 

SI. PRINCIPLES OF GEOGRAPHY. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. 
Hall. 

Sib. PRINCIPLES OF GEOGRAPHY. Credit one semester hour. Mr. 
Hall. 

Stic. GEOGRAPHY AND NATURE STUDY FOR PRIMARY GRADES. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Hall. 

Stid. GEOGRAPHY AND NATURE STUDY FOR PRIMARY GRADES. 
Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Hall. 

S43d. METHODS OF TEACHING GEOGRAPHY. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Smith. 

S26a. TYPES OF INDUSTRY. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Smith. 

S26b. TYPES OF INDUSTRY. Credit, one semester hour. Mr. Smith. 

HISTORY 

51. MODERN EUROPE. Credit, three semester hours. Miss GuUander. 

52. MODERN EUROPE. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Gullander. 

511. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Largent. 

512. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. Credit, three semester 
hours. Miss Largent. 



148 The North Carolina College for Women 

S27a. INTER-RACIAL RELATIONS. Credit, two semester hours, col- 
lege or graduate. Mr. Jackson. 

S3 lb. HISTORY OF MODERN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT. Credit, two 
semester hours, college or graduate. Mr. Tamblyn. 

S23 AND 24. REPRESENTATIVE AMERICANS. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Jackson. 

S3 5. THE SOUTH. Credit, two semester hours, college or graduate. 
Mr. Jackson. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

S22. COSTUME DESIGN. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Peterson. 

S33. HOME MANAGEMENT. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Shaffer. 

S35. ART APPRECIATION. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Peterson. 

S65. METHODS IN HOME ECONOMICS. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Shaffer. 

S102. ART STRUCTURE. Credit, two semester hours, college or gradu- 
ate. Miss Peterson. 

S126. NUTRITION. Credit, two semester hours, college or graduate. 
Miss Shaffer. 

HYGIENE 

51. GENERAL HYGIENE. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Collings. 

52. GENERAL HYGIENE. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Collings. 

S46. CHILD HEALTH AND SCHOOL SANITATION. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Collings. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

54. FUNCTION AND USE OF LIBRARIES. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mrs. Hussey. 

55. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. 
Hussey. 

56. LIBRARY ADMINISTRATION. Credit, two semester hours. 

57. REFERENCE AND BIBLIOGRAPHY. Credit, two semester hours. 

58. BOOK SELECTION. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Hussey. 

59. CLASSIFICATION AND CATALOGUING. Credit, two semester 
hours. 

PHYSICS 

SI AND 2. GENERAL PHYSICS. Credit, six semester hours. Mr. 
Warfield. 

53. HOUSEHOLD PHYSICS. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. Foster. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

S21a. NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Elliott. 

S22a. STATE GOVERNMENT. Credit, two semester hours. Miss EUiott. 

S28. AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES. Credit, two semester hours, 
college or graduate. Miss Elliott. 



The Summer Session Division 149 

PSYCHOLOGY 

S21. GENEEAL PSYCHOLOGY. Credit, three semester hours. Miss 
Chitester. 

S21b-22a. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY AND INDIVIDUAL 
DIFFERENCES. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Highsmith. 

S22b. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mr. Highsmith. 

S24a. CHILD STUDY AND CHILD CARE. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss Seago. 

S26a. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Seago. 

S30a. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. High- 
smith. 

S33a. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PSYCHOLOGY. Credit, two semester 
hours, college or graduate. 

S41a. ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY AND MENTAL HYGIENE. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Seago. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

FRENCH 

SI AND 2. BEGINNING COURSE. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Taylor. 

S3a AND 4a. SECOND YEAR COMPOSITION. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Hooke. 

S3b AND 4b. SECOND YEAR LITERATURE. Credit, four semester 
hours. Mr. Hooke, Mr. Hardre. 

S5a AND 6a. THIRD YEAR COMPOSITION. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Hardre. 

S5b. AND 6b. THIRD YEAR LITERATURE. Credit, four semester 
hours. 

S37. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH DRAMA. Credit, two semester hours, 
college or graduate. Mr. Hooke. 

S60. METHODICAL BUILDING OF A CONCRETE FRENCH VO- 
CABULARY. Credit, two semester hours, college or graduate. Mr. Hardre. 

S61b AND 62b. FRENCH PHONETICS. Credit, two semester hours, 
college or graduate. Mr. Barney. 

S63 AND 64. REALIA AND REVIEW. Credit, two semester hours. 
Graduate credit by arrangement. Mr. Barney. 

S70. PROBLEMS AND PROJECTS. Credit, three semester hours, col- 
lege or graduate. Mr. Barney. 

SPANISH 

SI AND 2. BEGINNING COURSE. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
La Rochelle. 

S3 AND 4. SECOND YEAR COURSE. Credit, six semester hours. Miss 
Thompson. 



150 The North Carolina College for Women- 

sociology 

S21a. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mr. Johnson. 

S27a. INTER-RACIAL RELATIONS. Credit, two semester hours, col- 
lege or graduate. Mr. Jackson. 

S28. ANTHROPOLOGY. Credit, two semester hours. Graduate credit oy 
arrangement. Mr. Johnson. 

S36. CRIME AND DELINQUENCY. Credit, two semester hours, college 
or graduate. Mr. Johnson. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 

S63a. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Kimmel. 

S64a. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Kreimeier. 

S63c AND 64c. OBSERVATION AND PARTICIPATION. Credit, one 
semester hour. Miss Payne. 

S81a. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. Credit, two semester hours, 
college or graduate. Mr. Graham. 

S83a. MORAL EDUCATION. Credit, two semester hours, college or 
graduate. Mr. Graham. 

S84. HISTORY OF EDUCATION. Credit, two semester hours, college 
or graduate. Mr. Clutts. 

PRIMARY EDUCATION 

S41a. METHODS OF PRIMARY READING. Credit, two semester hours. 
Miss MacFadyen. 

S41e. LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE PRIMARY GRADES. Credit, two 
semester hours. Miss Land. 

S41f. PRIMARY NUMBER AND PROJECTS. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Land. 

S41g. CURRICULUM MAKING IN THE PRIMARY GRADES. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Land. 

S42. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
MacFadyen. 

594. PRINCIPLES AND ACTIVITIES OF THE KINDERGARTEN. 

Credit, two semester hours, college or graduate. Miss Woolworth. 

595. KINDERGARTEN— FIRST GRADE CURRICULUM. Credit, two 
semester hours, college or graduate. Miss Woolworth. 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR INTERMEDIATE AND UPPER GRADE 

TEACHERS 

S43b. ARITHMETIC FOR GRAMMAR GRADE AND JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL TEACHERS. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Kimmel. 

S44. LANGUAGE, COMPOSITION, AND READING FOR INTERME- 
DIATE AND UPPER GRADES. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Payne. 



The Summer Session Division 151 

S44ab. LAEGE UNIT TEACHING IN THE INTERMEDIATE AND 
UPPEE GEADES. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Fitzgerald. 

S66a. THE TEACHING OF LITEEATUEE IN THE GEAMMAE 
GEADES. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Gould. 

585. THE CURRICULUM FOE GEADES FOUR,. FIVE, AND SIX. 
Credit, two semester hours, college or graduate. Miss Fitzgerald. 

S43a. METHODS OF TEACHING GEOGEAPHY. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

S45a. COMPOSITION AND GEAMMAE IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. 
Credit, two semester hours. Miss Kreimeier. 

S45b. LITEEATUEE IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss Kreimeier. 

S46a. PEOBLEMS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Mr. Clutts. 

S49b. METHODS AND MATEEIALS IN TEACHING HIGH SCHOOL 
SCIENCE. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Smith. 

S50a. THE TEACHING OF HISTOEY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE IN 
SENIOE HIGH SCHOOL. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Boyington. 

S50b. THE TEACHING OF SOCIAL STUDIES IN JUNIOE HIGH 
SCHOOL. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Boyington. 

S57a. MATEEIALS AND METHODS IN HIGH SCHOOL MATHE- 
MATICS. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Kimmel. 

S69a. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING IN HIGH SCHOOLS. Credit, two 
semester hours. Mr. Clutts. 

S69b. TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING IN HIGH SCHOOLS. Credit, one 
semester hour. Mr. Clutts. 

ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION 

S73. SUPERVISION OF PEIMAEY GEADES. Credit, two semester 
hours. Graduate credit by arrangement. Miss Woolworth. 

575. SUPEEVISION OF THE UPPEE GEADES. Credit, two semester 
hours, college or graduate. Miss Fitzgerald. 

576. ELEMENTAEY SCHOOL ADMINISTEATION. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours, college or graduate. Mr. Graham. 

S82. INVESTIGATION OF STUDY HABITS. Credit, two semester 
hours, college or graduate. Miss Boyington. 

586. CLASSEOOM TESTING. Credit, two semester hours, college or 
graduate. Mr. Koos. 

S88. EDUCATIONAL DIAGNOSIS AND SELF-SURVEYS OF 
SCHOOLS. Credit, two semester hours, college or graduate. Mr. Koos. 

S94. SUPEEVISION OF INSTRUCTION. Credit, two semester hours, 
college or graduate. Mr. Koos. 

FINE AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

S51a. FUNDAMENTALS OF DEAWING. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mrs. Currier. 



152 The North Carolina College for Women 

S52a. INDUSTRIAL ARTS. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Currier. 

S54. ART EDUCATION IN" THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mrs. Weatherspoon. 

S56. HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS FOR ART APPRECIATION. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Weatherspoon. 

MUSIC 

51. HARMONY. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Friedrich. 

52. HARMONY. Credit, three semester hours. Miss Friedrich. 

53. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss More. 

54. SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING. Credit, two semester 
hours. Miss More, Miss Barnes. 

SI 7a. CHORUS. Credit, one-half semester hour. Miss More. 

S35. MUSIC APPRECIATION METHODS FOR ELEMENTARY 
GRADES. Credit, two semester hours. Miss More. 

S41a. SIGHT SINGING. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

S42a. METHODS AND MATERIALS— PRIMARY. Credit, two semes- 
ter hours. Miss Barnes. 

S42b. METHODS AND MATERIALS— GRAMMAR GRADES. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

S46a. MUSIC SUPERVISION. Credit, two semester hours. Miss More. 

S68. PRIVATE LESSONS IN PIANO. Miss Minor. 

S77. CLASS METHODS IN PIANO. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Clement. 

S77b. CLASS PIANO FOR ADULT BEGINNERS. Miss Clement. 

SI 16. PRIVATE INSTRUCTION IN ORGAN. Mrs. Eichhorn. 

PENMANSHIP 

51. PENMANSHIP. Certification credit. Miss Llewellyn. 

52. PENMANSHIP. Certification credit. Miss Llewellyn. 

53. PENMANSHIP. Certification credit. Miss Llewellyn. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

520. THEORY AND PRACTICE IN TEAM GAMES. Credit, one semes- 
ter hour. Miss Bonitz. 

SI. PLAYGROUND ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Fitzwater. 

521. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY GRADES. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Fitzwater. 

523. NATURAL DANCING. No credit. Miss Fitzwater. 

524. CHILD RHYTHMS. No credit. Miss Bonitz. 

525. CLOGGING. No credit. Miss Bonitz. 

S29. SWIMMING. No credit. Miss Fitzwater, Miss Bonitz. 



The Summer Session Division 153 



COURSES OF SECOND SUMMER SESSION 

BIOLOGY 

SI AND 2. GENEEAL BIOLOGY. Credit, six semester hours. 

ECONOMICS 

S26. TYPES OF INDUSTRY. Credit, two semester hours. 

S34a. THE STANDARD OF LIVING. Credit, two semester hours, col- 
lege or graduate. Mr. Schwenning. 

S35a. HUMAN RELATIONS IN INDUSTRY. Credit, two semester 
hours, college or graduate. Mr. Schwenning. 

ENGLISH 

511. LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Tillett. 

512. LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION. Credit, three semester hours. 
Miss Tillett. 

S59. PROSE STUDIES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY. Credit, 
two semester hours, college or graduate. Mr. Painter. 

S61. ENGLISH LITERATURE 1660-1744. Credit, two semester hours, 
college or graduate. Mr. Painter. 

S66. THE TEACHING OF LITERATURE IN THE GRAMMAR 
GRADES. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Rudisill. 

S88. ARTHURIAN ROMANCE. Credit, two semester hours, college or 
graduate. Mr. Painter. 

S94. THE NEW BIOGRAPHY. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Tillett. 

GEOGRAPHY AND NATURE STUDY 

51. PRINCIPLES OF GEOGRAPHY. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Grounds. 

52. NORTH AMERICA. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Grounds. 

S41c. GEOGRAPHY AND NATURE STUDY FOR PRIMARY GRADES. 
Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Grounds. 

S26. TYPES OF INDUSTRY. Credit, two semester hours. 

HISTORY 

S12a. AMERICAN HISTORY. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Johns. 

S25b. LATIN-AMERICAN HISTORY. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Johns. 

S37b. AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mr. Johns. 

S42b. IMPERIALISM IN THE WORLD WAR AND IN POST-WAR 
EUROPE. Credit, two semester hours, college or graduate. Mr. Arnett. 

S81. HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA TO 1835. Credit, two semester 
hours, college or graduate. Mr. Arnett. 



154 The North Carolina College for Women 

S83 AND 84. CURRENT HISTORY. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Arnett. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

S21a. NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. Credit, two semester hours. Miss 
Elliott. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

S21a. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. 
Martin. 

S22. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. Credit, three semester hours. Mr. 
Martin. 

S28a. PSYCHOLOGY OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SUBJECTS. Credit, 
two semester hours, college or graduate. Mr. Martin. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 

FRENCH 

S3a AND 4a. FRENCH — SECOND YEAR COMPOSITION. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mr. Underwood. 

S4b AND 5b. FRENCH — INTERMEDIATE TRANSLATION. Credit, 
four semester hours. Mr. Underwood. 

S5a AND 6a. THIRD YEAR COMPOSITION. Credit, two semester 
hours. Mr. Underwood. 

SPANISH 

S3 AND 4. SECOND YEAR COURSE. Credit, six semester hours. Mrs. 
Gerberich. 

SOCIOLOGY 

S35a. SOCIAL PROBLEMS. Credit, two semester hours. Mr. Schwennig. 

GENERAL EDUCATION COURSES 

S13a. PUBLIC EDUCATION. Credit, two semester hours. 

S63a. SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. 
Credit, two semester hours. 

S70. SOCIAL INTERPRETATION OF EDUCATION. Credit, two 
semester hours, college or graduate. 

S82a. STATE AND COUNTY SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. Credit, 
two semester hours. Mr. Coltrane. 

S91a. EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE. Credit, two 
semester hours, college or graduate. Mr. Coltrane. 

S97. EDUCATIONAL PUBLICITY. Credit, two semester hours, college 
or graduate. Mr. Coltrane. 

PRIMARY EDUCATION 

S41e. LANGUAGE, READING, AND DRAMATIZATION FOR PRI- 
MARY GRADES. Credit, two semester hours. 

S41f. PRIMARY NUMBER AND PROJECTS. Credit, two semester 
hours. 

S42. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. Credit, two semester hours. 



The Summer Session Division 155 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR INTERMEDIATE AND UPPER GRADE 

TEACHERS 

S43b. ARITHMETIC FOR GRAMMAR GRADE AND JUNIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL TEACHERS. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Rudisill. 

S44. LANGUAGE, COMPOSITION, AND READING FOR INTERME- 
DIATE AND UPPER GRADES. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Rudisill. 

S66. THE TEACHING OF LITERATURE IN THE GRAMMAR 
GRADES. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Rudisill. 

FINE AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

S51a. FUNDAMENTALS OF DRAWING. Credit, two semester hours. 
Mrs. Currier. 

S52a. INDUSTRIAL ARTS. Credit, two semester hours. Mrs. Currier. 

MUSIC 

S17a. CHORUS. Credit, one-half semester hour. Miss Barnes. 

S33. MUSIC APPRECIATION METHODS FOR ELEMENTARY 
GRADES. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

S41a. SIGHT READING. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

S41b. SIGHT READING. Credit, two semester hours. Miss Barnes. 

PENMANSHIP 

51. PENMANSHIP. Certification credit. 

52. PENMANSHIP. Certification credit. 

53. PENMANSHIP. Certification credit. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

S21. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR ELEMENTARY GRADES. Credit, 
two semester hours. Miss Gregory. 

S25. CLOGGING. No credit. Miss Gregory. 

S29. SWIMMING. No credit. Miss Gregory. 



156 The North Carolina College for Women 

THE LIBRARY 

Charles H. Stone, A.M., B.L.S., Librarian 



The Library occupies a central location on the campus. It was 
remodeled several years ago and is now one of the largest and 
best equipped in the State, with a present capacity of about 95,000 
volumes and accommodations for four hundred readers. On the 
first floor are the reference room, periodical room, librarian's 
office, catalogue and work rooms, and stacks. The second floor has 
a large special reading room in which not only fiction, but out- 
standing books of travel, biography, and other interesting subjects 
are kept on open shelf. There are also a large reading room for 
reserve books and the Library Science laboratory and class room 
on this floor. Vaults and storage rooms are in the basement. 

Facilities are offered for reading and study during library hours, 
which extend from 8 :00 A. M. to 10 :00 P. M. each week day. Spe- 
cial reference librarians are always in charge, and are ready to 
give aid and guidance in reading and investigations. The library 
now has about 60,000 volumes, and valuable additions are being 
made as rapidly as possible by purchase and by gift. Special effort 
is being made to build up the section of the Library concerned 
with North Carolina history and literature. Another special group 
which has recently been given much attention is the collection of 
children's literature. Many beautifully illustrated editions of the 
classics in this field have been added, and the various types of 
children's reading are well represented. The periodical room is 
supplied with hundreds of the best magazines and newspapers, 
both American and foreign. Many valuable back files of these have 
been obtained, and these with the various periodical indexes afford 
a vast storehouse of valuable material. 

The Library provides the student with three types of reading: 
reference, supplementary, and recreational. The reference books, 
such as the dictionaries, encyclopedias, and yearbooks, are kept in 
the reference room, and are for use there under the guidance and 
aid of the Reference Librarian. The books assigned by instructors 
for supplementary reading are kept in the reserve room on the 
second floor and are to be used in this room only, except when 
taken out for over-night use. A recent innovation is the open-shelf 
system for this material. The student may go directly to the shelf 
and choose what is wanted. The third type of reading is the cul- 
tural, inspirational, and recreational group. The fiction and a 
selected number of interesting books are kept in the special reading 
room and are charged from there. 



The Library 157 

The largest part of the book collection is housed in the stacks. 
These books must be looked up in the card catalog and asked for 
at the loan desk. They may be taken from the Library for a period 
of two weeks. 

Two other worth-while types of library material are the peri- 
odicals and pamphlets. The periodicals, both bound and unbound, 
are to be used in the periodical room only. The pamphlet material 
and government documents are handled by the Reference 
Librarian. 

Fines are imposed for failure to return material on time. 
Failure to comply with regulations or disfigurement of books and 
periodicals may result in withdrawal of Library privileges. 



PART V— THE RECORD, 1931-1932 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT 
1931 

AYCOCK AUDITORIUM 
Monday, June 8, 1931 



Processional — Coronation March (Le Prophet) Meyerbeer 



National. Anthem 



Invocation 



Commencement Address — The Test of Democracy 

Deets Pickett, Research Secretary, 
Board of Temperance, Washington, D. C. 



The Old North State 



Lo ! Hear the Gentle Lark Bishop 

Mathilda Geiger 

Flute obligato, Susan Sharp 

Marian Anderson at the piano 



Presentation of Candidates for Degrees 



Awarding of Diplomas 



The College Song 



Benediction 



Recessional — March from Aida Verdi 



Commencement 159 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES 



PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS TO CANDIDATES 

President Julius I. Foust 



BACHELORS OF ARTS 

Presented by Dean William C. Smith 

Emily Euth Abbott Greensboro, Guilford 

Mabel Carpenter Aderholt Lexington, E. 4, Davidson 

Euby Arlene Allen Lilesville, Anson 

Bernice Apple Greensboro, Guilford 

Thora Armstrong Jamestown, Guilford 

Eosalie McNeely Avery Morganton, Burke 

Nancy Kerr Baker Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Eloise Erith Banning Ealeigh, Wake 

Mary Ellen Bass Vale, E. 3, Lincoln 

Annie Beaman § Jacksonville, Fla. 

Edna Bennett * § Wadesboro, Anson 

Clara Bivens Monroe, Union 

Miriam Block Greensboro, Guilford 

Kate Newland Boger Morganton, Burke 

Ila Mae Bost t § Shelby, Cleveland 

Caroline Patricia Braswell Greensboro, Guilford 

Frances Brisendine Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Mary Irene Britt Bentonville, E. 1, Wayne 

Betty Burton Brown Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Elizabeth Butts § South Hill, Va. 

Alma Gertrude Campbell * $ Carthage, Moore 

Sarah Frances Chaffin Mocksville, Davie 

Alice Virginia Chatfield Southern Pines, Moore 

Mary Elizabeth Chittenden Weldon, Halifax 

Lucile Margaret Clark Enfield, Halifax 

Virginia Clark . . . Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Margaret Lydia Cohoon Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

Margaret Jewell Cole Greensboro, Guilford 

Annie Laurie Coppedge Spring Hope, Nash 

Eliza Eoberts Cowper Gatesville, Gates 

Margaret Kathleene Cox Sanf ord, E. 1, Lee 

Marjorie Craig * $ Greensboro, Guilford 

Sarah Catherine Cromartie Eaef ord, Hoke 

Evelyn Cummings High Point, Guilford 

Ellie Currin Oxford, Granville 

Hilda Dare Davidson Greensboro, Guilford 

Mildred Davis Zebulon, Wake 

Maf alda Dawson Dunn, E. 1, Sampson 

Eugenia Fearrington DeLaney Matthews, E. 2, Union 

Mary Ethel Dalton $ Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Pearle Dellinger Cherryville, Gaston 

Clifford Dolvin Siloam, Ga. 



* Dated July 19, 1930. 
t Dated June 10, 1929. 
§ Absent by permission. 



160 The North Carolina College for Women 

Lily Dolvin Siloam, Ga. 

Margaret Louise Donnell Asheville, Buncombe 

Elizabeth Ella DuVernet Greenville, S. C. 

Barbara Mae Eaker Bessemer City, Gaston 

Buth Elizabeth Ellen Bocky Mount, Nash 

Frances Elizabeth E'shelman High Boint, Guilford 

Virginia Frances Faison Faison, Duplin 

Daisy Wilson Farr West Asheville, Buncombe 

Anne Fawcette Mount Airy, Surry 

Margaret Fawcette Asheville, Buncombe 

Frances Cline Ferguson Hickory, Catawba 

Clyde Fields * § Amelia, Alleghany 

Ellen Lewis Fletcher Anderson, S. C. 

Marian Esther Flournoy Greensboro, B. 3, Guilford 

Annie Mae Flowe Matthews, K. 3, Union 

Nell Bebecca Forrest Efland, Orange 

Elneita Foscue Trenton, Jones 

Julia Tomlinson Fowler Statesville, Iredell 

Mattibelle Fraley Statesville, Iredell 

Frances Sledge Freeman * § Conway, Northampton 

Marie Elise Frisard Morganton, Burke 

Celia Gerskov Mooresville, Iredell 

Julia Elizabeth Gilliam Sanf ord, Lee 

E'ula Blanche Glenn § Gastonia, Gaston 

Matilda Elizabeth Glenn Gastonia, Gaston 

Otilia Doris Goode Greensboro, Guilford 

Allie Lee Graham * § Clinton, Sampson 

Mary Margaret Greenlee § Old Fort, McDowell 

Margaret Elizabeth Gribble Dallas, Gaston 

Buth Guilford Statesville, Iredell 

Mary Lee Guion Waxhaw, Union 

Cecelia Halberstadt Belhaven, Beaufort 

Mary Louise Hanby Wilmington, New Hanover 

Annie Lois Hancock Scotland Neck, Halifax 

Sarah Cornelia Harrelson Cherryville, Gaston 

Hazel Joyce Harriss Washington, Beaufort 

Evelyn Hellen Hart Greenville, Pitt 

Martha Louisa Hatch Hamlet, Bichmond 

Boberta Dolores Hayes Grif ton, Pitt 

Leah Heilig Goldsboro, Wayne 

Marjorie Jeannette Henley Laurinburg, Scotland 

Sara Carolyn Henry North Wilkesboro, Wilkes 

Gladys Levon Hicks Bockingham, Bichmond 

Mamie Agnes Holloway § Durham, Durham 

Martha Hunter Hood Gastonia, Gaston 

Pauline Elizabeth Hood Dover, Jones 

Mary Dalice Howard Fayetteville, Cumberland 

Mary Elizabeth Hoyle Gastonia, Gaston 

Marguerite Huguelet .' Hamlet, Bichmond 

Margaret Priscilla Hundley Draper, Bockingham 

Odessa Mae Hunter . Spartanburg, S. C. 

Mary Elizabeth Jarrett * § Hayesville, Clay 

Mabel Claire Jarvis * § Asheville, Buncombe 

Emma Ophelia Jernigan Asheville, Buncombe 

Emilie Eve Jewett * § , Wilmington, New Hanover 



* Dated July 19, 1930. 
§ Absent by permission. 



Commencement 161 

Iola Jimeson Marion, McDowell 

Jane Ermina Johnson Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sarah Kathleen Johnson Asheville, Buncombe 

Virginia Caroline Johnson Columbus, Ga. 

Mary Lucile Jones Portsmouth, Va. 

Sarah Lillian Kille West Asheville, Buncombe 

Emma Gertrude King Princeton, Johnston 

Dorothy Kiser Kings Mountain, Cleveland 

Gertrude Kiser Bessemer City, Gaston 

Mary Lowman Kiser Hickory, Catawba 

Mary Lucille Knight Chase City, Va. 

Annie Ethel Leonard East Spencer, Eowan 

Nell Elizabeth Lewis Holly Springs, Wake 

Penelope May Lewis Farmville, E.F.D., Pitt 

Jane Iredell Lynch Wilmington, New Hanover 

Sarah Margaret McCormick Laurinburg, Scotland 

Grayce Gaynelle McCracken Tarboro, Edgecombe 

Anne Gordon McDowell Waynesville, Haywood 

Annie Isabel McFadyen Eaef ord, Hoke 

Martha Leona McGee Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Mary Byrd McGowan Greer, S. C. 

Cornelia McKimmon Kaleigh, Wake 

Elizabeth Louise McLaughlin Cleveland, Eowan 

Margaret Elma MeManus Albemarle, Stanly 

Evelyn Murphy McNeill Lumberton, Eobeson 

Euth Ahlborn Markham Durham, Durham 

Annie Laurie Martin Wadesboro, E. 1, Anson 

Fleeta Martin Dunn, Harnett 

Kathryn Kasch Mauer Linden, N. J. 

Arbutus Meadows Bryson City, Swain 

Sallie Lorene Meares Fair Bluff, Columbus 

Martha Mohn Medcalf Baltimore, Md. 

Emily Moore Mellon Stony Point, Alexander 

Jessie Wiggs Middleton Laurinburg, Scotland 

Euby Spencer Milliken Morganton, Burke 

Mary Mills Mooresville, Iredell 

Mary Whitty Mitchell New Bern, Craven 

Marie Lucinda Molitor Swedesboro, N. J. 

Sarah Elizabeth Monty Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Eosa Coit Moore Eocky Mount, Nash 

Margaret Elizabeth Morgan Asheville, Buncombe 

Edna Parker Mullen Drum Hill, Gates 

Ermine Camilla Neal Marion, McDowell 

Pearle Elizabeth Neville Enfield, Halifax 

Olive Newell Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Steele Norwood Monroe, Union 

Annie Laura Oliver * § Yanceyville, Caswell 

Mary Welsh Parker Marshville, Union 

Zelma Gray Parker Wilmington, New Hanover 

Irene Patterson Burlington, E. 1, Alamance 

Nancy Leonora Patterson Gastonia, Gaston 

Lola Elyzabeth Payne Lenoir, Caldwell 

Betty Frances Peele Aulander, Bertie 

Mary Fowle Perry Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Mildred Ashton Person § Macon, Warren 



* Dated July 19, 1930. 
§ Absent by permission. 



162 The North Carolina College for Women 

Helen Catherine Petrie , Lenoir, Caldwell 

Evelyn Margaret Pollard Virgilina, Ya., E.F.D. (Granville, N. C.) 

Laura Kathryn Porter Franklin, Macon 

Kathryn Wright Price Wilmington, New Hanover 

Mary Vassie Proctor * § Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Lola Proffitt Goshen, Wilkes 

Mildred Ada Propst § Concord, Cabarrus 

Frances Pully Kinston, Lenoir 

Charlotte Isabel Purcell Salisbury, Eowan 

Mary Delia Eankin Mount Holly, Gaston 

Sarah Pearle Eaper Welcome, Davidson 

Maud Mclver Eatledge Madison, Eockingham 

Hazel Eay Hendersonville, Henderson 

Augusta Osborne Eaymond Wake Forest, Wake 

Mary Maddox Eaysor Asheville, Buncombe 

Evelyn Estelle Eeeves Asheville, Buncombe 

Lucy Eeeves Laurel Springs, Ashe 

Alice Keesler Eenfrow § Matthews, Mecklenburg 

E'velyn Mae Eives Greensboro, Guilford 

Manie Eachel Eobinson Morven, Anson 

Cecil Eogers Statesville, Iredell 

Euby Caviness Eosser Jonesboro, Harnett 

Eleanor Eothwell Lewisburg, W. Va. 

Lillie Beatrice Eoyster * § Spray, Eockingham 

Anne Eoyal Saunders Wilmington, New Hanover 

Geraldine Elizabeth Sayre Tryon, Polk 

Janie Secrest Monroe, Union 

Helen Elizabeth Seif ert New Bern, Craven 

Euthe Winifred Shafer * § , Greensboro, Guilford 

Meta Shaffer Four Oaks, Johnston 

Lucy Helen Shearin Littleton, Halifax 

Frances Shearon Wake Forest, Wake 

Martha Pearl Shore Boonville, Yadkin 

Esther Elizabeth Shreve Moorestown, N. J. 

Annie Lee Singletary Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

Ethel Sledge Danville, Ya., E. 5 (Caswell, N. C.) 

Nettie Fleming Smith * § Wilmington, New Hanover 

Sarah Elizabeth Smith * § Salisbury, Eowan 

Nancy Ellen Stoner Biltmore, Buncombe 

Sallie Kathelene Stott Wendell, Wake 

Mary Pearle Sykes Asheboro, Eandolph 

Mabel Davis Tate High Point, Guilford 

Virginia Dare Tatum * § Elizabethtown, Bladen 

Annie Lee Thompson Maxton, E. 3, Eobeson 

Noelle Thomson Lake Waccamaw, Columbus 

Yerna Elizabeth Tolleson Greensboro, Guilford 

Nancy Mildred Tomlinson Wilson, Wilson 

Sue Girardeau Trenholm Eocky Mount, Nash 

Jeannette Graham Trotter Pilot Mountain, Surry 

Florence Lucile Yarner Whittier, Swain 

Eloise Ward Eose Hill, E. 1, Duplin 

Margaret Ware Mount Holly, Gaston 

Mary Jane Wharton Greensboro, Guilford 

Frances Cherrie White Clayton, Johnston 

Helen Virginia Williams Hendersonville, Henderson 



* Dated July 19, 1930. 
§ Absent by permission. 



Commencement 163 

Margaret Ann Williams Asheville, Buncombe 

Maud Lorena "Williams Kings Mountain, Cleveland 

Margaret Harrison Winstead Wilmington, New Hanover 

Mildred Ernestine Winston Youngsville, Franklin 

Katherine Eloise Woosley Mebane, Alamance 

Eva Woosley Mebane, Alamance 

Martine Aekerman Wright Bichmond, Va. 

Buth Coffin Yates § Winston-Salem, Forsyth 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mazel Winfield Bowles Candler, Buncombe 

Zelma Hearn Day High Point, Guilford 

Margaret Compton Hanna Asheville School, Buncombe 

Charlotte Moseley Hill Kinston, Lenoir 

Euth Lowe Hopkins Greensboro, Guilford 

Edith Kimsey Asheville, Buncombe 

Katharine Morgan Salisbury, Eowan 

Mary Katharine Newton Hickory, Catawba 

Kate Hendley Eobinson Ansonville, Anson 

Edith Marshall Vail Spring Hill, Ala. 

Nellie Gray Wheeler Guilford College, Guilford 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN HOME ECONOMICS 

Presented by Deax Blanche E. Shaffer 

Hazel Elizabeth Bell Gastonia, E. 4, Gaston 

Lucy Powers Blake Watha, Pender 

Louise Boliek Hickory, Catawba 

Madge Carpenter Cline Lincolnton, B.F.D., Catawba 

Cora Lee Cox Greensboro, Guilford 

Vera Nancy Cox Eaef ord, Hoke 

Julia McKinnie Davis New Bern, Craven 

Annie Euth German Boomer, Wilkes 

Margaret Evelyn Gibson Biltmore, Buncombe 

Ella Nell Green Marshville, Union 

Anita Hobson Boonville, Yadkin 

Hazel Cathrin Jenkins Greensboro, Guilford 

Cleata Eufala Jones Catawba, Catawba 

Almeta Goodman Kellog Sunbury, Gates 

Jewel McBane Saxapahaw, Alamance 

Hazel Claire McEachern Wilmington, New Hanover 

Mildred Louise Masten Winston-Salem, E. 6, Forsyth 

Mary Frances Misenheimer Richfield, Stanly 

Sallie Josephine Mooring Bethel, Pitt 

Edris Woltz Morrow Virgilina, Va. 

Virginia Emily Motte Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Katherine Elizabeth Parham Marietta, Eobeson 

Mary Wilkie Petrie Lenoir, Caldwell 

Alice Bailey Pickett Shelbvville, Ky. 

Edna Eaby Hickorv, Catawba 

Euth Eaby Hickory, Catawba 

Madge Mozelle Ehyne Gastonia, Gaston 

Alline Annie Richardson Murphy, Cherokee 



§ Absent by permission. 



164 The North Carolina College for Women 

Emilie Litchfield Eichardson Southern Pines, Moore 

Annie Gladys Kogers Asheville, Buncombe 

Theo Allen Euddock Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Edna Cathryn Sapp Kernersville, Forsyth 

Frances Sink Greensboro, Guilford 

Dorothy Kathryn Spence Asheville, Buncombe 

May Swann Stedman, Cumberland 

Annie Elizabeth Tucker , Advance, E. 2, Davie 

Lelia Mildred Turner Polkton, Anson 

Ella Euth "Williams Elizabeth City, Pasquotank 

BACHELORS OF SCIENCE IN MUSIC 

Presented by Dean Wade E. Brown 

Mae Ingram Ballard Morven, Anson 

Mary Mathilda Geiger Charlotte, Mecklenburg 

Frances Louise Gorham Battleboro, E. 1, Edgecombe 

Dora Edith Meigs New London, E. 2, Stanly 

Mary Inez Murray Greensboro, Guilford 

Mary Elizabeth Eatledge Advance, Davie 

Matilda Eobinson Greensboro, Guilford 

Katie May Smith * § Asheboro, Eandolph 

Mary Boddie Smith Chadbourn, Columbus 

Gladys Odell Spencer * $ Hobucken, Pamlico 

Selma Stegall Greensboro, Guilford 

Maude Terrell Waynesville, Haywood 

Nell Thurman Greensboro, Guilford 

Frances Wallace Statesville, Iredell 

Henrietta Wallace Statesville, Iredell 

Sarah Catherine Wharton Greensboro, Guilford 

Louise Whittington Greensboro, Guilford 



* Dated July 19, 1930. 
§ Absent by permission. 



Enrollment Summary 165 



ENROLLMENT SUMMARY, 1931-1932 



Senior Class 296 

Junior Class 254 

Sophomore Class 352 

Freshman Class 561 

Commercial Class 208 

Special Students 41 

Total Eegular Session 1712 

First Summer Session 1931 843 

Second Summer Session 1931 222 

Total Summer Sessions 1065 

Total Number Enrolled 2777 

Number Counted Twice 328 

Number Counted Three Times 30 

358 

2419 

Training School Enrollment 350 

Training School Enrollment Summer Session 1931 115 

465 

Total Exclusive of Extension Enrollment 1931-32 2884 



166 The North Carolina College for Women 

INDEX 



PAGE 

Academic Board, Directors of 54 

Academic Board, Members of 20 

Academic Eegulations 41 

Administration, Health 53 

Administrative Officers 6 

Admission of Students, Eequirements for 30-37 

To Advanced Standing 36 

To the Dormitories 48 

To Graduate Division 139-140 

To Home Economics Course 33 

To Music Course 33 

Advisers for Freshmen and Sophomores 20 

Agriculture, Admission Eequirements in 35 

Alumnae and Former Students Associations 58 

Alumnae Loan Funds 49-51 

Alumnae News 63 

Anatomy and Human Physiology, Courses in 66-67 

Archery Club , 59 

Art Department in Home Economics 101-102 

Arts, Eequirements for Bachelor of 37 

Association, Young Women 's Christian 57 

Astronomy, Courses in 64 

Attendance 44 

Bacteriology, Courses in 67-68 

Biology, Courses in 64-67 

Admission Eequirements in 35 

Laboratories 28 

Biological Theory, Courses in 65 

Board of Directors 5 

Bookkeeping 138 

Botany, Courses in 65-66 

Admission Eequirements in 35 

Botany Club 59 

Budget System, Student Organizations 63 

Buildings 25-29 

Bulletins, College 63 

Business Law, Courses in 97 

Cabinet, President 's 6 

Calendars 2-3 

Cercle Francais 60 

Certificates, School of Education 126-129 

Certificates, Teachers ' 39 

Change of Course, Eegulations Concerning 41 

Chemistry, Courses in 68-69 

Entrance Eequirements in 35 

Laboratories 27 

Chemistry Club 60 

Chorus, College 133 

Circulo E'spanol 60 

Classification 42 

Clubs, Extension Department 's Service to 142 

College Calendar , 3 



Index 167 

PAGE 

College, Establishment 22 

Exclusion from 45 

Grounds and Buildings 25-29 

Location 24-25 

Purpose, Organization, and History 22-24 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 124-125 

College Record, 1931-1932 158 

Commerce and Secretarial Training 98-99 

Commercial Department 137-138 

Certificates in 138 

Certificates to Teach High School Commercial Subjects 127-128 

Committees of the Faculty 20-21 

Concerts and Lectures 56 

Cooking — See Home Economics 

Course, Change of 41 

Courses of Instruction 64-123 

Credits 41-42 

Statements of 44 

Summer Session and Extension Credits 42 

Deficiencies in Entrance Requirements 44 

Degrees 37 

Course Leading to Bachelor of Arts 37-40 

Course Leading to Bachelor of Science in Commerce 98-99 

Course Leading to Bachelor of Science in Home Economics 135-136 

Course Leading to Bachelor of Science in Music 130-132 

Course Leading to Bachelor of Science in Physical Education 88-89 

Course Leading to Master of Arts 139-140 

Degrees Conferred in 1931 159-164 

Democracy, Spirit of in College 56 

Departments of Instruction 64-123 

Department of Student Life 52-53 

Der Deutsche Verein 60 

Dining Room and Dormitory Supervision 54 

Diploma Fee 47 

Directions to New Students 29-30 

Director, Vocational 55 

Directors, Board of 5 

Dolphin Club 60 

Dormitories, Admission to 48-49 

Economics, Courses in 96-99 

Education, Certificates in 126-129 

Education Club 61 

Education, Courses in 70-75 

Education, Grammar Grade Certificates 127 

Education, High School Certificates 126-127 

Education, School of 126-129 

English, Department of 76-84 

Admission Requirements in 34 

Enrollment Summary 1931-1932 165 

Entrance Requirements 30-37 

Entrance Deficiencies 44 

Establishment of College 22 

Examinations 43 

Entrance ,30 

Reports of and Grades 43-44 

Exclusion from College 45 

Expenses 45-49 



168 The North Carolina College for Women 

-PAGE 

Extension Division , 141-144 

Credits 42 

Work 55 

Faculty 7-19 

Standing Committees of 20-21 

Fees 45-48 

Fellowships 49-52 

Free Tuition Agreement 48 

French, Courses in 119-121 

Entrance Kequirements in 34 

Freshman Week 40 

Geography and Nature Study, Courses in 68 

German, Courses in 84-85 

Entrance Eequirements 34-35 

Government of College 52-57 

Graduate Division 139-140 

Graduates, 1931, List of 159-164 

Grounds and Buildings 25-29 

Gymnasium Outfit .90-91 

Health, Department of 86 

Health Administration .. . 53 

Historical Museum 29 

History, Courses in .91-94 

Entrance Eequirements 33 

History of the College 22-24 

Home Economics Club 61 

Home Economics, School of 135-136 

Courses Leading to Degree of Bachelor of Science in Home 

Economics 135-136 

Courses in 99-103 

Entrance Eequirements 35 

Laboratories 28 

Hygiene, Courses in 86 

Important Directions to New Students 29-30 

Information 22-63 

International Eelations Club 61 

Institutional Management 102-103 

Institute of Women's Professional Eelations 55-56 

Italian, Courses in 123 

Laboratories 27-29 

Laboratory Fees 47 

Latin, Courses in 103-104 

Law, Course in Business 97 

Lecture and Eecital Courses 56, 133 

Library 156-157 

Library Science, Courses in 105-107 

Literary Societies 59 

Loan Funds 49-51 

Location of the College 25 

Madrigal Club 133 

Masqueraders, The 61 

Masters ' Degree, Eequirements for 139-140 

Mathematics, Courses in 107-109 

Entrance Eequirements 33 

Mathematics Club 61 

Medical Attention 53-54 

Museum, Historical 29 



Index 169 

PAGE 

Music, School of 130-134 

Admission Kequirements 35-36 

High School Music Contest 134 

Courses in 109-114 

Graduation Eequirements 132 

Organizations 133 

New Students, Directions to 29-30 

Non-Eesidents, Tuition Charges 47 

Officers of Administration 6 

Orchestra, College 133 

Orchesis Club 62 

Organ, Course in 110 

Organization of the College 124 

Organizations, College 57-59 

Student 59-63 

Outdoor Theatre 27 

Physical Education, Courses in 87-90 

Eequirements for Admission to Bachelor of Science Course in Physical 

Education 32 

Physical Geography, Entrance Eequirements 35 

Physics, Courses in 114-117 

Entrance Eequirements in 35 

Laboratories 27 

Physiology, Courses in 66-67 

Entrance Eequirements 35 

Piano, Courses in 109 

Pine Needles 63 

Play-Likers Club 61 

Play Production Laboratory 28 

Political Science, Courses in 94 

Prescribed Entrance Eequirements 32-33 

President 's Cabinet 6 

Principals and Supervisors 129 

Prizes 51-52 

Psychology, Courses in 117-119 

Publications, College 63 

Public School Music 131-132 

Public Speaking 77 

Quill Club 62 

Eeeital and Lecture Courses 56, 133 

Eecitals, Students 132 

Eecord, College 158-165 

Eegistration, 1932-1933 40 

Eeligious Life 56 

Eeports, Examinations 43-44 

Eequirements for Admission, Prescribed 32-33 

Eequirements for the Bachelor 's Degree 37-40 

Eequirements for the Master 's Degree 139-140 

Eesidence Eequirements 44 

Eomance Languages, Department of 119-123 

Scholarships 49-52 

Science Club 62 

Secretarial Training 98-99 

Shorthand 137 

Social Sciences, Department of the 91-99 

Societies, Student 59 

Sociology, Courses in 94-96 



170 The North Carolina College for Women 

PAGE 

Spanish, Courses in 121-123 

Admission Requirements 35 

Speakers ' Club 62 

Specifications of Requirements for Admission 33-36 

Spirit of Democracy 56-57 

Statement of Credits 44 

Stenography . 137 

Stenotypy 137 

Student Life, Department of 52-53 

Student Organizations 57-63 

Student Organization Budget System 63 

Students ' Recitals 132 

Summary, 1931-1932 Enrollment 165 

Summer Session 145 

Courses in 146-155 

Credits 42 

Rooms and Board in 145 

Scope 145 

Special Bulletin 145 

Supervision, Dining Room and Dormitory 54 

Teaching Under Supervision in School of Education 129 

Textbooks 47-48 

Theatre, Outdoor 27 

Tuition Charges 45-48 

Agreement Required 48 

Free 48 

Typewriting 138 

Vaccination, Required 30 

Violin, Courses in 110 

Vocational Director 55 

Vocational Subjects for Entrance 31 

Voice Culture 110, 131-132 

Withdrawals 45 

Women's Professional Relations, Institute of 55-56 

Young Women's Christian Association 57-58 

Young Voters ' Club 63 

Zoology, Courses in 66 

Admission Requirements in 35 

Field Club 63 



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